This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Papa Don't Preach

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

"Papa Don't Preach"
Madonna, Papa Don't Preach cover.png
Single by Madonna
from the album True Blue
B-side"Pretender"
ReleasedJune 11, 1986
Recorded1985
GenreDance-pop
Length
  • 4:29
Label
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
Madonna singles chronology
"Live to Tell"
(1986)
"Papa Don't Preach"
(1986)
"True Blue"
(1986)
Music video
"Papa Don't Preach" on YouTube

"Papa Don't Preach" is a song recorded by American singer-songwriter Madonna for her third studio album True Blue (1986). The song was written by Brian Elliot with additional lyrics by Madonna, who produced it alongside Stephen Bray. Furthermore, it was included in the compilation albums The Immaculate Collection (1990) and Celebration (2009). Musically, "Papa Don't Preach" combines pop and classical styling, with lyrics that talk about teenage pregnancy, and the choices that come with it. The teen gossip Elliot would hear outside his recording studio inspired him to write it.

Released as the album's second single in mid-1986, it saw commercial success, becoming Madonna's fourth number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100; "Papa Don't Preach" also performed well internationally, reaching the top position in the United Kingdom and Australia. It was lauded by contemporary critics, who noted an artistic growth in Madonna's work, and frequently cited it as a highlight in the album and a milestone in her career. The music video, directed by James Foley, shows the singer in her first "head-to-toe" image makeover, with a leaner, more toned body, and cropped platinum blonde hair. Its main storyline had Madonna trying to tell her father, played by actor Danny Aiello, about her pregnancy. The scenes are juxtaposed with shots of her dancing and singing in a small, darkened studio, and spending a romantic evening with her boyfriend, played by Alex McArthur.

Shortly after its release, the song caused heated discussions about its lyrical content. Women's organizations and others in the family planning field criticized Madonna for encouraging teenage pregnancy, while groups opposed to abortion saw the song as having a positive anti-abortion message. Madonna has performed "Papa Don't Preach" in five of her concert tours, the last being 2019―2020's Madame X Tour. The single's performance at the Who's That Girl World Tour (1987) caused Madonna's first conflict with the Vatican, as she dedicated it to Pope John Paul II, who urged Italian fans to boycott her concerts. In 2002, British singer Kelly Osbourne recorded a cover of the song, which was met by lukewarm critical reception, but achieved commercial success.

Background and release[edit]

During the autumn of 1985, Madonna started writing and recording songs for her third studio album, True Blue; she brought back Steve Bray and hired a new producer, Patrick Leonard.[1] The album's first track, "Papa Don't Preach", was written by Brian Elliot, who described it as "a love song, maybe framed a little bit differently [...] about a young girl who found herself at a crossroads in life and didn’t know where to turn".[2] Elliot, who had recorded an album of his own for Warner Bros., was producing sessions for an artist named Cristina Dent. When he played her tracks for Warner's Michael Ostin, the same A&R executive who discovered "Like a Virgin", he asked if he could play "Papa Don't Preach" for Madonna;[3] Elliot had been working with Dent for six months and was reluctant to let the song go to another artist, but he eventually gave in, finding the idea of Madonna recording his song "hard to resist".[4]

The lyrics of the song are based on teen gossip Elliot would hear outside his recording studio, which has a large front window that doubled as a mirror where schoolgirls from the Los Angeles' North Hollywood High School would regularly stop to fix their hair and chat.[5] Madonna only contributed with some additional lyrics, making "Papa Don't Preach" the only song on the album that she did not have a strong hand in writing.[3] In the United States, "Papa Don't Preach" was released as True Blue's second single on June 11, 1986;[6] in Europe, it was released five days later.[7][8][9][10][11] Afterwards, it was included on Madonna's compilation albums The Immaculate Collection (1990), and Celebration (2009).[12][13] In a 2009 interview with Rolling Stone, the singer was asked by Austin Scaggs why she felt attracted to the song's theme and lyrics; she replied,

[The song] just fit right in with my own personal zeitgeist of standing up to male authorities, whether it's the pope, or the Catholic Church or my father and his conservative, patriarchal ways. ... For 'Papa Don't Preach' there were so many opinions – that's why I thought it was so great. Is she for 'schma-smortion', as they say in Knocked Up? Is she against abortion?[14]

Composition[edit]

"Papa Don't Preach" is a dance-pop song with instrumentation from acoustic, electric, and rhythm guitars, keyboards, and string arrangements; it is set in common time, and moves at a moderate tempo of 116 beats per minute.[15] Written in the key of F minor, the combination of key and tempo produces a disjuncture between pop and classical rhythms, underlined by the instrumentation during the introduction.[16] It begins with a distinctly Vivaldian style, as the fast tempo and classical-style chord progression anticipates the lyrics to follow. The opening chords and the melody emphasize the tonic of the leading notes: Fm–E–D–Cm–D–E–Fm–D–E–Fm, resembling a Baroque work. This is followed by the sound of dance music, produced by a powerful beat from the instruments.[16] Madonna's vocal range spans from F3 to C5,[15] and was described as being "more mature" and "centered" than that of her previous works.[16]

The lyrics talk about a girl who tells her father that she's pregnant and refuses to have an abortion or give up the baby for adoption, despite her friends' advice.[17] The track is constructed in a verse-chorus form, with a bridge before the third and final chorus; at the beginning, she addresses her father directly, asking him to talk to her as an adult, "You should know by now that I'm not a baby". The transition to the chorus employs a more dramatic voice with a higher range, ending nearly in cries as she sings the word "Please". Leading to the chorus, Madonna switches to a pleading voice, singing the song's main hook in a high tone. During the bridge, the song features a Spanish-inspired rhythm, one of the earliest examples of the influence that Hispanic music had on Madonna's musical style.[16]

Critical reception[edit]

"Papa Don't Preach" was considered the best song from True Blue by People's Drew Mackie;[18] in the image, Madonna singing the track on 2004's Re-Invention World Tour

The song has been acclaimed since its release. According to Rolling Stone's Davitt Sigerson on his review of True Blue, "only the magnificent 'Papa Don’t Preach' has the high-profile hook to match 'Like a Virgin', 'Dress You Up' and 'Material Girl'", and compared it to Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean" (1983).[19] From the Chicago Tribune, Daniel Brogan referred to it as "stunning".[20] Stephen Thomas Erlewine, for Allmusic, called it a "masterstroke" and applauded Madonna for "using the music to hook in critics just as she's baiting a mass audience".[21] Santiago Fouz-Hernández, co-author of Madonna's Drowned Worlds (2004), pointed out it was a "significant milestone in [Madonna]'s artistic career".[16] Adam Sexton, author of Desperately Seeking Madonna: In Search of the Meaning of the World's Most Famous Woman (2008), named it True Blue's "boldest" track; although its melody is just as "insistently chugging" as the singer's previous singles "Into the Groove" and "Dress You Up" (1985), the mood is "tense and claustrophobic".[22] For Entertainment Weekly's David Browne, "a 30-ish urban sophisticate singing in the voice of a pregnant teen [...] ought to sound ridiculous. With the help of collaborators like Stephen Bray and Patrick Leonard, though [...] [it] turns into a perfectly conceived pop record".[23] From the New York Times, Stephen Holden pointed out that "Madonna sings it in a passionate, bratty sob that makes the plea immediate and believable".[24]

Caroline Sullivan from The Guardian, opined that it was the artist's "first socially controversial single, and one of her best tunes to boot [...] it wasn't her first attempt at a teenage persona (see also 'Dress You Up'), but it was the most endearing".[25] Sal Cinquemani from Slant, thought it was "undeniably more mature" than the singer's previous works up at that point, further adding that, with songs like "Papa Don’t Preach", "[Madonna] made the transition from pop tart to consummate artist, joining the ranks of the decade’s icons like Michael Jackson and Prince".[26] Writing for PopMatters, Peter Piatkowski said it was an "idiosyncratic tune", that shared the "maturity and ambition" of previous single "Live to Tell".[27] For the Los Angeles Times, Robert Hilburn expressed that the "most obvious growth is in the control and character in Madonna's singing", and considered the lyrics to be "tailor-made for video".[28] The Arizona Republic's Ed Masley noted a "huge artistic growth" and "more soul than was expected at the time" in the singer's vocals.[29] One lukewarm review came from The Daily Iowan's Jeff Hamilton: [Madonna] had a good year at the stores, but can anyone take her music seriously? [...] In terms of scrutable ideology ['Papa Don't Preach'] doesn't represent a change from 'Like A Virgin'".[30] While reviewing The Immaculate Collection on its 25th anniversary, People's Drew Mackie said of the single:

Arguably the best track from the True Blue album, ["Papa Don’t Preach"] gets straight to the heart of a lot of what makes Madonna, Madonna: sex, rebellion against the patriarchy, and a whole lot of Catholicism thrown in. It’s a fantastic song, and it will always be one of Madonna’s best. It’s no wonder it not only hit the No. 1 spot [of the Hot 100], but also spent two weeks there.[18]

Retrospective reviews have also been positive: for Parade, Samuel R. Murrian praised it for treating a "complicated subject with humanity and the gravity it merits", and having an "ace[s] pop hook driving it"; he named it Madonna's 25th best song.[31] It was ranked in the 21st place of Slant's ranking of Madonna singles: Paul Schrodt opined it "may well be the only song about choosing not to have an abortion that also feels rebellious, even dangerous". Schrodt further singled out the "cinematic string arrangement", which gives the track a "sweeping backdrop", concluding that "Madonna has rarely sounded more impassioned".[32] Entertainment Weekly's Chuck Arnold also considered it her 21st best, and the staff of Billboard her 28th.[33][34] Jude Rogers, from The Guardian, named it her fifth greatest song, praising its "glorious string arrangement [that] adds cinematic authority", and Madonna's vocals.[35] For Yahoo!'s Nicole Hogsett, "['Papa Don't Preach'] proved that Madonna could tackle a serious topic but still keep her signature sound".[36] From website Albumism, Justin Chadwick said that "Papa Don't Preach" was "arguably the most unforgettable of True Blue's many memorable moments".[37] According to Gay Star News' Joe Morgan, "Papa Don't Preach" is the singer's tenth best single, while the HuffPost's Matthew Jacobs ranked it her 14th, highlighting its "sweeping string arrangement" as "one of pop music's most engaging openings".[38][39] For Stereogum's Tom Breihan, "Papa Don't Preach" is an example of "how Madonna, a technically limited singer, could always capture the feeling of a song".[40] At the 29th Grammy Awards, "Papa Don't Preach" was nominated for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance but lost to Barbra Streisand's The Broadway Album.[41][42]

Commercial reception[edit]

On June 18, 1986, "Papa Don't Preach" was added to 174 of 226 pop reporting radio stations, which caused it debut on the Billboard Hot 100 at number 42.[43] One month later, the song reached the sixth place of the chart, becoming Madonna's ninth consecutive top 10 single; she became the fourth female artist in the rock era to earn this amount of consecutive top 10 singles, behind only Brenda Lee, Aretha Franklin and Donna Summer.[44] On August 16, "Papa Don't Preach" reached the Hot 100's first position and spent two weeks there. It was Madonna's fourth US number one.[45] This also gave her her eight consecutive top 5 hit, the most for any artist in the 1980s; Madonna became one of only three acts to amass a total of eight top 5 hits - consecutive or not - in the decade, the others being Air Supply and Lionel Richie.[46] It placed at position 29 for the Billboard Year-End chart for 1986.[47] In October 1998, it was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for shipment of 500,000 copies.[48] "Papa Don't Preached" entered the Dance Club Songs chart at number 38 the week of July 19, eventually peaking at number four on August 30.[49][50] The single also peaked at 16 on the Adult Contemporary chart.[51] In Canada the song debuted at number 53 of the RPM singles chart on July 5, eventually reaching and remaining on the top for two weeks on August 9.[52][53] "Papa Don't Preach" came in at position 13 of RPM's 1986 Year-End chart.[54]

In the United Kingdom, the single debuted at number 13 on the Singles Chart on June 28, before climbing to number one two weeks later; it remained three consecutive weeks at the top, and 15 weeks on the chart in general.[55] "Papa Don't Preach" was certified gold by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) on August 1986 for shipment of 500,000 copies.[56] According to Music Week magazine, over 629, 386 copies of the single have been sold in the United Kingdom as of 2008.[57] The song was commercially successful across Europe as well: it topped the charts in Belgium,[7] Ireland,[58] and Norway,[59] and peaked within the top 5 in Austria,[60] France,[8] Germany,[9] the Netherlands,[61] Spain and Switzerland.[62][11] In Italy, the song spent 12 consecutive weeks at the top of the Musica e dischi charts.[63] "Papa Don't Preach" reached the first position of the Eurochart Hot 100, where it remained for 11 weeks.[64] The song also reached the top of the charts in Australia, and the top 5 in South Africa and New Zealand.[65][66][67]

Music video[edit]

Background and synopsis[edit]

Refer to caption
The "Papa Don't Preach" music video saw Madonna's first "head-to-toe image makeover", according to Parade's Samuel R. Murrian.[68] Georges-Claude Guilbert compared the singer's new look to Marilyn Monroe, Jean Seberg and Kim Novak[69]

The music video for "Papa Don't Preach" was directed by James Foley, who had previously worked with Madonna on "Live to Tell";[70] production was done by David Naylor and Sharon Oreck, while Michael Ballhaus was in charge of the photography.[71] It was shot on location over three days in May 1986 in Staten Island, New York and Manhattan; according to Foley, Madonna wanted something "a bit more grounded and 'drama'", having just done the "very glamorous and stylized" videos for "Material Girl" and "Like a Virgin", thus he suggested filming in Staten Island.[72] Actor Danny Aiello was chosen by the singer to play her father on the clip; Aiello claimed he had never heard of the singer before and only agreed to do the video by petition of his daughter.[72][73] Actor Alex McArthur was signed on to play the singer's boyfriend and father of her child; she had spotted McArthur in a small role in the 1985 film Desert Hearts and thought he was a natural to play her mechanic boyfriend; "I was out in the garage working on my Harley [...] I answered the phone and a voice said, 'Hi, this is Madonna. I would like you to be in my next video'", the actor recalled.[74] For the music video, Madonna sported a complete image makeover: she changed the heavy jewelry and make-up, and adopted a gamine look similar to the one donned by Shirley MacLaine and Audrey Hepburn during the 1950s.[75][76] The video interspersed shots of the singer as a tomboy - dressed in jeans, black leather jacket, and a slogan T-shirt with the caption "Italians do it better" - with those of her in a "figure-revealing" outfit, consisting of a 1960s-style black bustier top and capri pants. Her body was also leaner and muscular.[77] Of the alternating looks and shots of the singer, Foley recalled:

We took the script literally from the lyrics of the song, and I remember having a moment's hesitation about doing that because most videos are not literal interpretations. But I just felt like it was something that tied into her desire to dip into the working-class world. I did have the idea that there should be a segment of the video where she was Madonna — not the character in the story — and that's where it cuts to the black and white stuff of her dancing around for the chorus.[72]

The clip starts with shots of the New York skyline, the Staten Island Ferry, and character close-ups.[78] Madonna, who plays an Italian American young woman, is seen walking along a lane; she thinks about her father (Aiello) and how much he loves her, and then goes to meet her boyfriend (MacArthur). The images are juxtaposed with shots of Madonna dancing and singing in a small, darkened studio. In the next scene, she walks away from her friends (Debi Mazar and Bianca Hunter), after they warn her about her boyfriend. Next, her and her boyfriend spend a romantic evening together on a barge where they reflect upon their lives after watching an elderly couple. Madonna then finds out that she is pregnant and decides to keep the baby. After much hesitation, she tells her father, who's shocked and leaves the room to think about the situation, before eventually accepting the pregnancy. Afterward, father and daughter hug each other.[78]

Reception and analysis[edit]

"Tackling the subject of an unplanned pregnancy, ['Papa Don't Preach'] was heavy on storyline, and set Madonna out as an artist who could do serious as well as sexy and fun. It is a testament to her stardom at this point that the video brought much excitement simply because she had dyed her hair blonde".

The Independent's Ben Kelly on "Papa Don't Preach" in his list of Madonna's ten best music videos.[79]

The video received positive reviews from critics. According to the staff of Rolling Stone, it was the moment Madonna began "treating the music video concept as more of a short film than promotional clip";[72] they also applauded her "rather unglamorous" look for fitting "nicely" with the song's subject matter.[80] For Hal Marcovitz, author of The History of Music Videos (2012), it marked a "sharp departure" from what the public was used to see in the singer's videos up until that point; "in most of her videos [she] promoted her sex appeal, usually strutting through her tightly choreographed dances in stiletto heels and barely there costumes".[81] Retrospective reviews have named it one of Madonna's best music videos: Idolator's Mike Neid placed it in the fourth position of his ranking, highlighting the singer's onscreen relationship with her father and applauding her for "showing off a more serious side of her artistry".[82] For The Odyssey, Rocco Papa also named it Madonna's fourth best and singled out the views of New York City.[83] It came in the sixteenth and tenth positions of the rankings created by The Backlot and Rolling Stone, respectively;[80] for the former, Louis Virtel said that "the urgency in her performance makes this video, as well as the climactic hug in the last second of the story".[84] Sal Cinquemani, on a Billboard article enlisting the singer's nine most controversial music videos, deemed it her "first bona-fide video controversy".[85] At the 1987 MTV Video Music Awards, "Papa Don't Preach" won Best Female Video, and was nominated for Best Cinematography and Best Overall Performance.[86]

Journalist Ellen Goodman referred to the video as a "commercial for teen-age pregnancy", and criticized it for "glamorizing" said subject; "[her] boyfriend is a hunky dreamboat with a conscience and moral compass, while her father is loving, supportive and even-tempered". Goodman argued that few pregnant teenagers would find a similar support from their boyfriends and families. "This happily-ever-after image has about as much to do with the reality of adolescent motherhood as Madonna's (shapely) figure has to do with pregnancy", the author concluded, and asked the singer to "call off the propaganda".[87][88] Fellow singer Cyndi Lauper also weighed in and added that "if you're a teen mother who wants to keep her baby [...] you're not going to look like Madonna [...] it ain't gonna be that easy. Fathers don't always come around to give you their blessing. The guy who knocked you up doesn't always hang around".[89] Georges-Claude Guilbert, author of Madonna as Postmodern Myth, said it was hard for him to believe that "[Madonna] did not know that she was going to cause a huge controversy [...] With such a song and video, she was throwing in America's face the image of a country ravaged by the abortion debate, which is far from being resolved".[69] He further viewed the singer as being "pro-choice"; "[she] deems that a woman (whatever her age) must choose whether to recur or not to abortion without paying attention to outside pressure. No representative of the feminist lobby or of the patriarchy will dictate her conduct".[69] In the book The Fiction of America: Performance and the Cultural Imaginary in Literature and Film (2013), Susanne Hamscha argued that the clip oscillates between liberal and conservative ideology, private and public, feminism and patriarchy, and "female independence and the need for paternal approval"; Amy Robinson stated that the topic of abortion is "explicitly" addressed in terms of the "private/public dive", and noted how Madonna's character "glorifies parental consent".[90]

Controversy[edit]

The song's performance on the Who's That Girl World Tour (1987) marked Madonna's first conflict with the Vatican[91]

As the song's popularity increased in the United States, so did the criticism and support it received from groups concerned with pregnancy and abortion. Feminist lawyer Gloria Allred, the spokeswoman of the National Organization for Women (NOW), angrily called for Madonna to make a public statement or another record supporting the opposite point of view.[92] Alfred Moran, the executive director of Planned Parenthood of New York City, also criticized the song, fearing that it would undermine efforts to promote birth control among teenagers and encourage teenage pregnancy. Recalling how in 1985 his agency's clinics were filled with girls dressed in a style similar to Madonna's, Moran felt that the song's message was "getting pregnant is cool and having the baby is the right thing and a good thing and don't listen to your parents, the school, anybody who tells you otherwise—don't preach to me, Papa. The reality is that what Madonna is suggesting to teenagers is a path to permanent poverty".[93] Similarly, social worker Kathie Peters added that "too many kids are getting pregnant. They don't know what they're getting into. I don't like the [song's] message".[93] The singer herself discussed the song with music critic Stephen Holden:

"Papa Don't Preach" is a message song that everyone is going to take the wrong way. Immediately they're going to say I am advising every young girl to go out and get pregnant. When I first heard the song, I thought it was silly. But then I thought, wait a minute, this song is really about a girl who is making a decision in her life. She has a very close relationship with her father and wants to maintain that closeness. To me it's a celebration of life. It says, 'I love you, father, and I love this man and this child that is growing inside me'. Of course, who knows how it will end? But at least it starts off positive.[24]

In contrast, groups opposed to abortion saw "Papa Don't Preach" as a positive, anti-abortion song. Susan Carpenter-McMillan, the president of the California chapter of Feminists for Life (FFL) in the US, said that "abortion is readily available on every street corner for young women. Now what Madonna is telling them is, hey, there's an alternative".[93] Tipper Gore, a founder of the Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC), who had previously denounced Madonna for perceived sexual content in her single "Dress You Up" and had led a campaign against explicit content in music, applauded the singer for speaking candidly about a serious subject; "['Papa Don't Preach'] speaks to a serious subject with a sense of urgency and sensitivity in both the lyrics and Madonna's rendition. It also speaks to the fact that there's got to be more support and more communication in families about this problem, and anything that fosters that I applaud".[94][95]

Composer Brian Elliot also weighed in: "I just wanted to make this girl in the song a sympathetic character. As a father myself, I'd want to be accessible to my children's problems".[2] Danny Aiello, having appeared in the video as the titular "Papa", recorded "Papa Wants the Best for You" later that year, an answer song written by Artie Schroeck from the father's point of view; he even asked Madonna to participate in a music video for the song, but she turned the offer down.[96][72] Madonna did not comment on the song's use as a pro-life statement; her publicist Liz Rosenberg said that "[she] is singing a song, not taking a stand [...] her philosophy is people can think what they want to think".[97]

Live performances[edit]

Madonna performing a shortened "Papa Don't Preach" on 2012's The MDNA Tour

"Papa Don't Preach" has been included on five of Madonna's concert tours: Who's That Girl (1987), Blond Ambition (1990), Re-Invention (2004), MDNA (2012) and Madame X (2019―2020). On the first one, she performed the song wearing a leather jacket over a 1950s blue dress;[98] the screen in the background showed portraits of Pope John Paul II, then-president of the United States Ronald Reagan, the White House, and the phrase "Safe sex".[98][99] In Italy, the Vatican publicly denounced the singer, with John Paul II going as far as to urge fans to boycott the concerts in the country.[91][100] Writing for the New York Times, Jon Pareles pointed out that, at certain point in the performance, Madonna tilted her chin up to resemble the cover photograph for True Blue.[101] Two different performances can be found on the videos Who's That Girl: Live in Japan, filmed in Tokyo on June, and Ciao Italia: Live from Italy, filmed in Turin on September.[102][103]

On 1990's Blond Ambition World Tour, "Papa Don't Preach" was given a Catholic theme: the stage was set up to resemble a cathedral with votive candles, while the singer wore black vestments and the dancers black kaftans;[104] they waved their hands over their heads as Madonna sang and danced.[105] Carlton Wilborn, one of the dancers, played a priest the singer interacted with.[106] While reviewing the Houston concert, the staff of the Orlando Sentinel highlighted the number's "joyous gospel and heavy gothic organ scorings".[104] Two different performances can be found in Blond Ambition Japan Tour 90, taped in Yokohama, and in Blond Ambition World Tour Live, taped in Nice.[107][108]

For the song's performance on 2004's Re-Invention World Tour, Madonna donned a plaid kilt and a black T-shirt that read "Kabbalists Do It Better" ― a nod to the one worn on the music video.[109] The number, which included a Ring a Ring o' Roses circle dance, was praised for its "playfulness and innocence" by Newsday's Glenn Gamboa.[110] An abbreviated "Papa Don't Preach" was included on Madonna's 2012 MDNA Tour; the performance found her rolling on the floor before being "manhandled and bound" by dancers dressed as tribal warriors.[111][112] Timothy Finn, for The Kansas City Star, noted it was the number that caused "the first big eruption" from the crowd.[113] The performances of the song at the November 19–20 shows in Miami were recorded and released in Madonna's fourth live album, MDNA World Tour.[114] "Papa Don't Preach" was one of the songs performed during Madonna's visit to The Late Late Show with James Corden on December 2016.[115] The singer again did a shortened rendition of the single on her Madame X Tour (2019―2020), where she changed the lyric "I'm keeping my baby" to "I'm not keeping my baby".[116] Selena Fragassi, from the Chicago Sun-Times, applauded Madonna for turning the song into a "platform for pro-choice beliefs".[117]

Covers[edit]

Kelly Osbourne[edit]

In 2002, Kelly Osbourne (picture) released a cover of "Papa Don't Preach", which was met with lukewarm critical reviews but achieved commercial success, reaching the top three in the United Kingdom and Australia

A pop-metal[118] cover of "Papa Don't Preach" was recorded by Kelly Osbourne in 2002; on April of that year, MTV reported that Osbourne had recorded a demo of the song at suggestion of her mother.[119] Produced by her brother Jack, it counted with the participation of Incubus members Mike Einziger and Jose Pasillas.[119] Executives for The Osbournes were impressed with the demo and requested a studio version, set to be included on an upcoming soundtrack to the series.[120] Osbourne then re-recorded the song without the involvement of her brother or the members of Incubus; this version, described as being "more polished", was added to The Osbourne Family Album soundtrack.[121] Explaining the cover, Osbourne said, “I love Madonna. Who doesn't?"[122] Afterwards, the song was added as a hidden bonus track to Osbourne's debut album Shut Up.[123]

To promote the release, Osbourne shot a music video in Los Angeles under the direction of Marcos Siega;[122] she then sang it live at the MTV Movie Awards, where her father introduced her to the audience.[121] Critical reviews were generally mixed: Billboard's Chuck Arnold considered it an "aggressive post-punk anthem" that's "certainly good for three minutes of steering-wheel banging on the way to the market".[124] NME's Peter Robinson, on the other hand, said it made "precisely zero sense", and criticized the presence of Incubus for making "the whole sorry mess barely distinguishable".[125] Entertainment Weekly's Rob Brunner was also negative on his review, dismissing the cover as "unnecessary".[126] Despite lukewarm critics, the single saw commercial success: it peaked at number three in the United Kingdom and Australia, where it received a platinum certification from the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA), for having sold over 70,000 units.[127][128][129] Furthermore, Osbourne's version reached the top 20 in Sweden, and the top 10 in Ireland and Finland.[130][131][132]

Other versions[edit]

In 1986, "Weird Al" Yankovic included the song in one of his polka medleys, "Polka Party!", taken from his album of the same name.[133] In 2002, French–Dutch group Mad'House did a Eurodance take on the song, that was included on their album Absolutely Mad.[134] One Year later, Picturehouse sang it for the first Even Better Than the Real Thing covers album.[135] Renditions of the song on tribute albums include Brook Barros on The Music of Madonna (2005) and a jazz version on Bo. Da's Plays Madonna in Jazz (2007).[136][137] "Papa Don't Preach" was sampled at the beginning of Mario Winans' 2004 single "Never Really Was".[138] Finally, in 2009, Dianna Agron sang the track on the eleventh episode of American television series Glee, "Hairography".[139]

Track listing and formats[edit]

Credits and personnel[edit]

  • Brian Elliot – Music and lyrics
  • Madonna – additional lyrics, producer, lead vocals
  • Stephen Bray – producer, synth bass, percussion, drums, keyboard
  • Reggie Lucas – producer of "Ain't No Big Deal"
  • David Williams – rhythm guitar
  • Bruce Gaitsch – electric guitar
  • John Putnam – acoustic guitar, electric guitar
  • Fred Zarr – additional keyboard
  • Johnathan Moffett – percussion
  • Billy Meyers – string arrangement
  • Siedah Garrett – background vocals
  • Edie Lehmann – background vocals
  • Herb Ritts – photography
  • Jeri McManus – design

Credits adapted from the True Blue album and the 12" single liner notes.[146][147]

Charts[edit]

Certifications and sales[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/sales
Belgium (BEA)[175] Gold 100,000[175]
France (SNEP)[177] Silver 456,000[176]
Japan (Oricon Charts) 34,410[178]
United Kingdom (BPI)[56] Gold 651,000[179]
United States (RIAA)[48] Gold 500,000^

^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cross 2007, pp. 40–41
  2. ^ a b Goldstein, Patrick (August 31, 1986). "Everyone has a sermon on 'Papa Don't Preach'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on September 4, 2019. Retrieved March 31, 2022.
  3. ^ a b Metz & Benson 1999, p. 48
  4. ^ Bronson, Fred (July 20, 2002). "Chart beat" (PDF). Billboard. 114 (29): 4. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved April 12, 2022.
  5. ^ "Gossip Composite". The Dallas Morning News. A. H. Belo Corporation. September 18, 1986.
  6. ^ "Madonna.com > Discography > Papa Don't Preach". Icon: Official Madonna website. Archived from the original on January 2, 2010. Retrieved May 14, 2022.
  7. ^ a b c "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved December 14, 2014.
  8. ^ a b c "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach" (in French). Les classement single. Retrieved December 14, 2014.
  9. ^ a b c "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach" (in German). GfK Entertainment charts. Retrieved December 14, 2014.
  10. ^ a b "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach". Singles Top 100. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  11. ^ a b c "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  12. ^ The Immaculate Collection (Liner notes). Madonna. Warner Bros. Records. 1990. 9 26440-1.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  13. ^ "'Celebration' - Track listing for CD & DVD announced". Icon: Official Madonna website. August 25, 2009. Archived from the original on January 2, 2010. Retrieved May 10, 2022.
  14. ^ Scaggs, Austin (October 29, 2009). "Madonna looks back: The Rolling Stone interview". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on July 25, 2018. Retrieved April 12, 2022.
  15. ^ a b "Papa Don't Preach: Digital sheet music". Alfred Publishing. Archived from the original on December 28, 2008. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  16. ^ a b c d e Fouz-Hernández & Jarman-Ivens 2004, p. 60-61
  17. ^ Bielen 1999, p. 151
  18. ^ a b Mackie, Drew (November 10, 2015). "VIDEO: Madonna's 'Immaculate Collection' Turns 25: All 17 Tracks Ranked". People. Archived from the original on March 10, 2018. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  19. ^ Sigerson, Davitt (July 17, 1986). "Home > Music > Album reviews > True Blue". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on August 16, 2018. Retrieved March 14, 2022.(subscription required)
  20. ^ Brogan, Daniel (July 11, 1986). "Madonna keeps faith with 'virgin' cause in 'True Blue'". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on February 4, 2019. Retrieved May 7, 2022.
  21. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (June 30, 1986). "Madonna > True Blue > Overview". AllMusic. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  22. ^ Sexton 1992, p. 218
  23. ^ Browne, David (December 14, 1990). "The Immaculate Collection (1990)". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on August 27, 2007. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  24. ^ a b Holden, Stephen (June 29, 1986). "Madonna goes heavy on heart". New York Times. Archived from the original on December 25, 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  25. ^ Sullivan, Caroline (July 4, 2001). "Top tracks you won't hear at Madonna's concert". The Guardian. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  26. ^ Cinquemani, Sal (March 9, 2003). "Review: Madonna, True Blue". Slant. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  27. ^ Piatkowski, Peter (June 21, 2021). "35 years ago Madonna staged on her (first) bid for artistic credibility with 'True Blue'". PopMatters. Archived from the original on June 21, 2021. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  28. ^ Hilburn, Robert (July 6, 1986). "Madonna is nobody's toy". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on June 18, 2012. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  29. ^ Masley, Ed (October 16, 2015). "Essential Madonna: Her 30 best singles of all time". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  30. ^ Hamilton, Jeff (December 18, 1986). "Albums promote style, not substance" (PDF). The Daily Iowan: 11. Retrieved April 12, 2022.
  31. ^ Murrian, Samuel R. (August 16, 2019). "We ranked the 100 best Madonna songs of all time". Parade. Archived from the original on August 16, 2019. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  32. ^ Staff (April 14, 2020). "All 82 Madonna singles ranked". Slant. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  33. ^ Arnold, Chuck (August 15, 2018). "Madonna's 60 best singles, ranked". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on August 15, 2018. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  34. ^ "The 100 greatest Madonna songs: Critics' picks". Billboard. August 15, 2018. Archived from the original on November 19, 2021. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  35. ^ Rogers, Jude (August 16, 2018). "Every one of Madonna's 78 singles – ranked!". The Guardian. Archived from the original on August 16, 2018. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  36. ^ Hogsett, Nicole (April 19, 2010). "The 20 best Madonna songs". Yahoo!. Archived from the original on October 24, 2012. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  37. ^ Chadwick, Justin (June 26, 2021). "Madonna's 'True Blue' turns 35: Anniversary retrospective". Albumism. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  38. ^ Morgan, Joe (August 15, 2014). "The definitive ranking of Madonna's top 55 songs". Gay Star News. Archived from the original on August 18, 2014. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  39. ^ Jacobs, Matthew (April 22, 2014). "The definitive ranking of Madonna's top 55 songs". HuffPost. Archived from the original on April 6, 2019. Retrieved April 23, 2022.
  40. ^ Breihan, Tom (December 28, 2020). "The Number Ones: Madonna's 'Papa Don't Preach'". Stereogum. Archived from the original on December 28, 2020. Retrieved May 14, 2022.
  41. ^ Hunt, Dennus (January 9, 1987). "Grammy nominations: Highs and lows - Winwood, Gabriel and Simon Garner Most Nominations". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 6, 2012. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  42. ^ "29th Annual GRAMMY Awards". The Recording Academy. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  43. ^ Ellis, Michael (June 28, 1986). "Hot 100 Singles Spotlight" (PDF). Billboard. 98 (26): 114. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  44. ^ Grein, Paul (July 26, 1986). "Chart beat" (PDF). Billboard. 98 (30): 6. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 19, 2022.
  45. ^ a b "Madonna Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  46. ^ Grein, Paul (August 2, 1986). "Chart beat" (PDF). Billboard. 98 (31): 6. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  47. ^ a b "Top Pop Singles" (PDF). Billboard. 98 (52): 7. December 27, 1986. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  48. ^ a b "American single certifications – Madonna – Papa Don't Preach". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  49. ^ "Hot Dance/Disco" (PDF). Billboard. 98 (29): 36. July 19, 1986. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  50. ^ a b "Madonna Chart History (Dance Club Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  51. ^ a b "Madonna Chart History (Adult Contemporary)". Billboard. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  52. ^ "Top Singles - Volume 44, No. 15, July 05 1986". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Archived from the original on October 7, 2012. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  53. ^ a b "Top RPM Singles: Issue 0710." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved December 14, 2014.
  54. ^ a b "Top Singles - Volume 45, No. 14, December 27 1986". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Archived from the original on October 18, 2012. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  55. ^ a b "Madonna: Artist Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  56. ^ a b "British single certifications – Madonna – Papa Don't Preach". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  57. ^ Jones, Alan (August 19, 2008). "The immaculate guide to 50 years of Madonna". Music Week. Archived from the original on August 21, 2008. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  58. ^ a b "The Irish Charts – Search Results – Papa Don't Preach". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  59. ^ a b "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach". VG-lista. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  60. ^ a b "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved December 14, 2014.
  61. ^ a b "Nederlandse Top 40 – Madonna" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  62. ^ a b Salaverri, Fernando (September 2005). Sólo éxitos: año a año, 1959–2002 (1st ed.). Spain: Fundación Autor-SGAE. ISBN 84-8048-639-2.
  63. ^ "Classifiche". Musica e Dischi (in Italian). Retrieved May 29, 2022. Set "Tipo" on "Singoli". Then, in the "Artista" field, search "Madonna".
  64. ^ a b "European Hot 100 Singles" (PDF). Music & Media. 3 (37): 12. September 20, 1986. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  65. ^ a b DeKnock, Jan (August 22, 1986). "Madonna Preaches Her Message to Appreciative Worldwide Audience". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved March 7, 2009.
  66. ^ a b "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  67. ^ "SA Charts 1969-1989: Acts m". Rock.co.za. Archived from the original on January 18, 2004. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  68. ^ Murrian, Samuel R. (August 16, 2018). "We ranked Madonna's 21 greatest music videos of all time - Happy birthday to the Queen of Pop". Parade. Archived from the original on August 17, 2018. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  69. ^ a b c Guilbert 2002, p. 169
  70. ^ Metz & Benson 1999, p. 309
  71. ^ Madonna (1990). The Immaculate Collection (VHS). Warner Music Vision.
  72. ^ a b c d e "Express Yourself: The Making of Madonna's 20 greatest music videos". Rolling Stone. February 25, 2015. Archived from the original on April 15, 2019. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  73. ^ "Danny Aiello: Madonna's 'Papa Don't Preach' video was 'crap'". HuffPost. November 18, 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2022.
  74. ^ "Alex McArthur's silent sizzling in a video with Madonna has women crying 'who's that?'". People. August 11, 1986. Archived from the original on June 4, 2009. Retrieved March 24, 2022.
  75. ^ Voller 1999, p. 24
  76. ^ Clerk 2002, p. 62
  77. ^ Mansour 2005, p. 352
  78. ^ a b Mitchell 2000, p. 15
  79. ^ Kelly, Ben (August 11, 2018). "Madonna at 60: The ten best music videos from the Queen of Pop". The Independent. Archived from the original on August 12, 2018. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  80. ^ a b "Readers' Poll: The best Madonna videos of all time". Rolling Stone. August 29, 2012. Archived from the original on October 8, 2018. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  81. ^ Marcovitz 2012, p. 55
  82. ^ Nied, Mike (August 16, 2018). "From 'Vogue' to 'Hung Up', Madonna's 25 best videos". Idolator. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  83. ^ Papa, Rocco (July 30, 2019). "The 10 best Madonna music videos of all-time". The Odyssey. Archived from the original on February 28, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  84. ^ Virtel, Louis (August 16, 2013). "Madonna's 55 best videos, in honor of her 55th birthday". The Backlot. Archived from the original on March 9, 2016. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  85. ^ Cinquemani, Sal (June 26, 2019). "Madonna's 9 most controversial videos, from 'Papa Don't Preach' to 'God Control'". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 17, 2021. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  86. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1987". MTV. Archived from the original on August 30, 2008. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  87. ^ Hart & Phelan 1993, p. 347
  88. ^ Marcovitz 2012, p. 58
  89. ^ Lauper 2011, p. 142
  90. ^ Hamscha 2013, p. 276
  91. ^ a b Buddenbaum 2009, p. 105
  92. ^ "Music-Rock news & notes". Los Angeles Daily News. Digital First Media. September 12, 1986. Archived from the original on October 17, 2012. Retrieved March 31, 2022.(subscription required)
  93. ^ a b c Dullea, Georgia (September 18, 1986). "Madonna's new beat is a hit, but song's message rankles". New York Times. Archived from the original on November 27, 2013. Retrieved March 31, 2022.
  94. ^ Denisoff 1988, p. 299
  95. ^ Thompson 2007, p. 18
  96. ^ Smith, Liz (October 22, 1986). "Papa gets second chance in new video". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. p. 102. Retrieved March 31, 2022.
  97. ^ Hart & Phelan 1993, p. 348
  98. ^ a b Hilburn, Robert (June 29, 1987). "Tour opens! It's true: Madonna is really good". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on May 14, 2014. Retrieved March 13, 2022.
  99. ^ Snead, Elizabeth; Zamost, Scott A. (July 2, 1987). "New Madonna tour sets racy tone". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on January 23, 2019. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  100. ^ Farber, Jim (October 22, 2008). "When it comes to controversy on tour, Madonna's been down this road". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on October 23, 2008. Retrieved March 13, 2022.
  101. ^ Pareles, Jon (July 15, 1987). "Pop: Madonna benefit for AIDS at the Garden". New York Times. Archived from the original on March 11, 2013. Retrieved March 13, 2022.
  102. ^ Madonna (1987). Who's That Girl: Live in Japan (VHS). Warner Home Video.
  103. ^ Madonna (1988). Ciao Italia: Live from Italy (VHS). Warner Home Video.
  104. ^ a b "Madonna embarks on a Tour de Force: her 'Blond Ambition' is a tough test for the competition". Orlando Sentinel. May 8, 1990. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  105. ^ Berger 2002, p. 108
  106. ^ Brown, Joe (June 8, 1990). "Madonna tour in vogue". Washington Post. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  107. ^ Madonna (1990). Blond Ambition Japan Tour 90 (VHS). Warner-Pioneer Japan.
  108. ^ Madonna (1990). Blond Ambition World Tour Live (Laserdisc). Pioneer Artists.
  109. ^ Walters, Barry (May 25, 2004). "Madonna Reinvents Herself". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  110. ^ Gamboa, Glenn (June 18, 2004). "Madonna not ready to quit". Newsday. Archived from the original on June 19, 2004. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  111. ^ Mervis, Scott (November 7, 2012). "Madonna is a 'girl gone wild' for Obama in Consol concert". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on November 10, 2012. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  112. ^ Elis, Niv (June 1, 2012). "MDNA Tour Review: Introducing Jihad Madonna". The Jerusalem Post. Archived from the original on June 16, 2013. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  113. ^ Finn, Timothy (October 31, 2012). "Madonna gives Kansas City an everlasting hello". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on November 1, 2012. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  114. ^ MDNA World Tour (CD, DVD, Blu-ray). Madonna. Interscope Records. 2013. 602537507054.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  115. ^ Kelley, Seth (December 8, 2016). "Madonna twerks, vogues and talks kissing Michael Jackson in full Carpool Karaoke (Watch)". Variety. Archived from the original on December 9, 2016. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  116. ^ Greenblatt, Leah (September 20, 2019). "Madonna brings freewheeling intimacy to Madame X tour". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  117. ^ Fragassi, Selena (October 17, 2019). "10:45 p.m. start time very much in vogue (and worth the wait) when you're Madonna". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on October 18, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  118. ^ Gill, Andy (January 6, 2014). "Album: The Osbournes". The Independent. Archived from the original on August 7, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  119. ^ a b "Kelly Osbourne collaborating with Incubus members on 'Papa Don't Preach' cover". MTV. April 2, 2002. Archived from the original on September 29, 2015. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  120. ^ Moss, Corey (April 26, 2002). "Kelly Osbourne's ready for her closeup with 'Papa Don't Preach' video". MTV. Archived from the original on December 26, 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  121. ^ a b Downey, Ryan J. (May 30, 2002). "Kelly Osbourne performing at MTV Movie Awards". MTV. Archived from the original on April 5, 2015. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  122. ^ a b Mancini, Rob (May 15, 2002). "Osbournes unveil f—ing Family Album". MTV. Archived from the original on November 2, 2015. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  123. ^ "Kelly Osbourne: Shut Up". PopMatters. February 13, 2003. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  124. ^ Arnold, Chuck (June 15, 2002). "Reviews & Previews: Singles" (PDF). Billboard. 114 (24): 24. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  125. ^ Robinson, Peter (September 12, 2005). "Kelly Osbourne featuring Incubus : Papa Don't Preach". NME. Archived from the original on January 23, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  126. ^ Brunner, Rob (June 3, 2002). "Music capsule review: Papa Don't Preach". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on January 25, 2008. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  127. ^ "Artist Chart History: Kelly Osbourne". Official Charts Company. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  128. ^ "Kelly Osbourne - Papa Don't Preach (song)". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on May 3, 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  129. ^ "ARIA Top 100 Singles for 2001". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on October 26, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  130. ^ "Kelly Osbourne - Papa Don't Preach (song)". Sverigetopplistan. Archived from the original on July 7, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  131. ^ "Kelly Osbourne - Papa Don't Preach (song)". Irish Recorded Music Association. Archived from the original on October 12, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  132. ^ "Kelly Osbourne - Papa Don't Preach (song)". YLE. Archived from the original on May 3, 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  133. ^ ""Weird Al" Yankovic: Parodies & Polkas". Official "Weird Al" Yankovic Website. Archived from the original on December 5, 2003. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  134. ^ "Mad' House > Absolutely Mad > Overview". AllMusic. September 3, 2002. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  135. ^ "Even Better Than the Real Thing Vol. 1". Apple Music. November 28, 2003. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  136. ^ "Brook Barros > The Music of Madonna > Overview". AllMusic. October 17, 2005. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  137. ^ "Bo. Da > Plays Madonna in Jazz > Overview". AllMusic. February 19, 2017. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  138. ^ "Single: Mario Winans - Never Really Was". CBBC. August 30, 2004. Archived from the original on May 30, 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  139. ^ Berk, Brett (November 25, 2009). "The gay guide to Glee: Episode 11, "Hairography"". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on April 13, 2016. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  140. ^ a b Papa Don’t Preach (US 7-inch Single liner notes). Madonna. Sire Records. 1986. 728660.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  141. ^ Papa Don’t Preach (Japanese 7-inch Single liner notes). Madonna. Sire Records. 1986. 9205030.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  142. ^ Papa Don’t Preach (International CD Video Single liner notes). Madonna. Sire Records. 1986. 9 25681-2.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  143. ^ Papa Don’t Preach (US 12-inch Maxi Single liner notes). Madonna. Sire Records. 1986. 9204920.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  144. ^ Papa Don’t Preach (European 12-inch Limited Single liner notes). Madonna. Sire Records. 1986. 020492.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  145. ^ Papa Don’t Preach (Germany Re-issued CD Single liner notes). Madonna. Sire Records. 1986. 721986.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  146. ^ True Blue (Liner notes). Madonna. Warner Bros. Records. 1986. 925442-2.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  147. ^ Papa Don't Preach (Liner notes). Madonna. Sire Records. 1986. 0-20492.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  148. ^ "Charts: Simples" (PDF). Pelo (in Spanish). No. 276. 1986. p. 7. Retrieved March 20, 2022.
  149. ^ a b "TOP 3 in EUROPE" (PDF). Music & Media. August 16, 1986. p. 16. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  150. ^ "European Airplay Top 50" (PDF). Music & Media. September 13, 1986. p. 4. Retrieved April 4, 2020.
  151. ^ "TOP 3 in EUROPE" (PDF). Music & Media. October 11, 1986. p. 14. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  152. ^ "Madonna Chart History". RÚV. March 22, 2016. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  153. ^ "TOP 3 in EUROPE" (PDF). Music & Media. August 2, 1986. pp. 11, 14. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  154. ^ "ハング・アップ" (in Japanese). Oricon. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  155. ^ "Madonna – Papa Don't Preach" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  156. ^ "TOP 3 in EUROPE" (PDF). Music & Media. September 27, 1986. p. 14. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  157. ^ "South African Rock Lists Website SA Charts 1969 – 1989 Acts (M)". Rock.co.za. Retrieved November 22, 2018.
  158. ^ "Cashbox Top 100 Singles" (PDF). Cashbox. August 16, 1986. Retrieved October 12, 2020.
  159. ^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. Australian Chart Book, St Ives, N.S.W. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  160. ^ "Jahreshitparaden 1986" (in German). Hung Medien. Archived from the original on October 21, 2004. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  161. ^ "Jaaroverzichten 1986" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Archived from the original on December 12, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  162. ^ a b c d "Top 10 Best Selling Singles" (PDF). Music & Media. 4 (6): 20. February 14, 1987. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  163. ^ "Top - 1986" (in French). Syndicat National de l'Édition Phonographique (SNEP). Archived from the original on January 11, 2012. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  164. ^ "Top 100 Single-Jahrescharts" (in Dutch). Ofizielle Deutsche Charts. Archived from the original on May 9, 2015. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  165. ^ "Top 100-Jaaroverzicht van 1986" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Archived from the original on April 18, 2015. Retrieved April 10, 2022.
  166. ^ "Jaaroverzichten 1986" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Archived from the original on March 23, 2018. Retrieved April 10, 2022.
  167. ^ "End of Year Charts: 1986". RMNZ. Archived from the original on November 20, 2015. Retrieved April 10, 2022.
  168. ^ "Schweizer Jahreshitparade 1986" (in German). Hung Medien. Archived from the original on April 23, 2001. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  169. ^ Copsey, Rob (April 16, 2021). "Official Top 40 best-selling songs of 1986". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on April 16, 2021. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  170. ^ "Year-end charts: Dance Club Songs". Billboard. 1986. Archived from the original on August 21, 2019. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  171. ^ "Dance Sales Singles/Albums 1986 (Top Dance Singles)". Billboard. December 31, 1986. Archived from the original on October 8, 2012. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  172. ^ "Year end poll - 1986" (PDF). Cashbox. 50 (28): 48. December 27, 1986. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  173. ^ "Home / Bijzondere lijsten / Decenniumlijst: 80's" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Archived from the original on May 30, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2022.
  174. ^ "Hot 100 turns 60!". Billboard. Archived from the original on August 3, 2018. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  175. ^ a b "European Gold & Platinum Awards 1986" (PDF). Music & Media. 3 (51/52): 33. December 27, 1986. Retrieved April 10, 2022.
  176. ^ Claimed sales for "Papa Don't Preach" in France (over 340,000):
  177. ^ "French single certifications – Madonna – Papa Don't Preach" (in French). InfoDisc. Retrieved April 10, 2022. Select MADONNA and click OK. 
  178. ^ Oricon Album Chart Book: Complete Edition 1970–2005. Roppongi, Tokyo: Oricon Charts. 2006. ISBN 4-87131-077-9.
  179. ^ Myers, Juatin (March 7, 2015). "Madonna's Official Top 40 Biggest Selling Singles". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on March 8, 2015. Retrieved April 10, 2022.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]