Parchment paper

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Parchment paper for baking

Parchment paper, baking paper, or bakery release paper are cellulose-based papers that have been treated or coated to make them non-stick. They are used in baking as a disposable non-stick surface. They should not be confused with wax paper or waxed paper, which is paper that has been coated in wax.

Parchment paper[edit]

Chocolate chip cookies on baking parchment paper

Modern parchment paper is made by running sheets of paper pulp through a bath of sulfuric acid[1] (a method similar to the way tracing paper is made) or sometimes zinc chloride. This process partially dissolves or gelatinizes the paper. This treatment forms a sulfurized cross-linked material, with high density, stability, and heat resistance, as well as low surface energy — thereby imparting good non-stick or release properties.[2] The treated paper has an appearance similar to that of parchment and, because of its stability, is sometimes used in legal documents for which parchment was traditionally used.[3]

Bakery release paper[edit]

The non-stick properties can be also achieved by employing a coated paper, for which a suitable release agent—a coating with a low surface energy and capability to withstand the temperatures involved in the baking or roasting process—is deposited onto the paper's surface; silicone (cured with a suitable catalyst) is frequently used.

Applications[edit]

A common use is to eliminate the need to grease sheet pans and the like, allowing very rapid turn-around of batches of baked goods. Parchment paper is also used to cook en papillote, a technique where food is steamed or cooked within closed pouches made from parchment paper.

Bakery paper can be used in most applications that call for wax paper as a non-stick surface. The reverse is not true, as using wax paper will cause smoke in the oven and affect taste.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mayer, Ferdinand F (May 1860). "Technical Intelligence—Vegetable Parchment—Papyrene". The American Journal of Science and Arts. XXIX (LXXXVI): 278.
  2. ^ "Silicone Coated Baking Sheets | Sierra Coating". Sierra Coating. Retrieved 2016-02-19.
  3. ^ "Blank Parchment Paper 135 GSM (Pack of 50)". Archived from the original on 2011-04-10.
  4. ^ "Parchment Paper vs. Wax Paper". Martha Stewart. Retrieved 2016-02-19.