Pariacaca

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For the Incan god, see Pariacaca (god).
Pariacaca
Paryaqaqa / Tullujuto
Pariacacaa.JPG
Mount Pariacaca
Highest point
Elevation 5,750 m (18,860 ft) [1]
Coordinates 11°59′30″S 75°59′30″W / 11.99167°S 75.99167°W / -11.99167; -75.99167Coordinates: 11°59′30″S 75°59′30″W / 11.99167°S 75.99167°W / -11.99167; -75.99167
Geography
Pariacaca is located in Peru
Pariacaca
Pariacaca
Peru
Location Peru, Lima Region, Junín Region
Parent range Andes, Paryaqaqa
Climbing
First ascent 1938, Pariacaca S, T. Dodge
1936, Pariacaca N, T. Dodge

Pariacaca,[1][2] Paria Caca,[3] Paryaqaqa,[4] Parya Qaqa,[3][5] (possibly from Quechua parya reddish; copper; sparrow, qaqa rock)[2][6][7] or Tullujuto[8] (possibly from Quechua tullu bone, qutu heap, "bone heap") is the highest mountain in the Pariacaca mountain range (or Huarochirí mountain range)[8] in the Andes of Peru, with a summit elevation of 5,751 metres (18,868 ft) above sea level.[1][8] It is situated on the border of the regions of Junín and Lima, southeast of Qullqip'ukru and Quriwasi. In ancient times it was considered a sacred mountain.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Pariacaca". www.montanasperuanas.com. Retrieved 2016-02-20. 
  2. ^ a b Astuhuaman, Cesar (2004). "Pariacaca: un oráculo imperial andino" (PDF). Ensayos en Ciencas Sociales (in Spanish). 1 (2): 33. Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Besom, Thomas (2010). Of Summits and Sacrifice: An Ethnohistoric Study of Inka Religious Practices. University of Texas Press. pp. 66–68. ISBN 9780292783041. 
  4. ^ Gérald Taylor, Rites et Traditions de Huarochirí. (1995)
  5. ^ a b Kaplan, Steven (1995). Indigenous Responses to Western Christianity. NYU Press. pp. 68–69. ISBN 9780814746493. 
  6. ^ Rodolfo Cerrón-Palomino, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Sufijos arcaicos quechuas en la toponimia andina, Etimologias, Lexis XXVI. 2 (2002): 559-577
  7. ^ Teofilo Laime Ajacopa, Diccionario Bilingüe Iskay simipi yuyayk'ancha, La Paz, 2007 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary)
  8. ^ a b c Echevarría, Evelio (2001). "The Cordillera Huarochiri, Peru" (PDF). The Alpine Journal (in Spanish). Retrieved 2016-03-03. 

External links[edit]