Parthenium incanum

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Mariola
Parthenium incanum foliage.jpg
Parthenium incanum growing in Walnut Canyon at Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Heliantheae
Genus: Parthenium
Species: P. incanum
Binomial name
Parthenium incanum
Kunth[1]

Parthenium incanum, with the common names mariola and New Mexico rubber plant, is a plant in the genus Parthenium of the family Asteraceae. [2]

The plant is native to North America, from the Southwestern United States through Northern, Central, and Southwestern Mexico.[2] Habitats include desert grasslands including in the Chihuahuan Desert, on dry gravel slopes, and on plains.

Description[edit]

Parthenium incanum grows from 1.5–3 feet (0.46–0.91 m) in height and width. Its foliage is a pubescent grayish-white. Small white flower clusters appear from July to October.[3]

Uses[edit]

Medicinal[edit]

The Jicarilla Apache used mariola as a traditional medicinal plant. It was prepared by boiling the plant's leaves, and the solution was then was rubbed over a pregnant woman's abdomen to relieve discomfort. [4] [5]

Cultivation[edit]

Parthenium incanum is cultivated as an ornamental plant, for use in drought tolerant, native plant, and wildlife gardens. [3] [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nova Genera et Species Plantarum 4:260, t. 391. 1820 "Plant Name Details for Parthenium incanum". IPNI. Retrieved June 30, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b USDA−GRIN: Parthenium incanum
  3. ^ a b Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Native Plant Information Network (NPIN): Parthenium incanum (mariola)
  4. ^ University of Michigan at Dearborn: Ethnobotany of Parthenium Incanum
  5. ^ Opler, Morris E. (1946). Childhood and youth in Jicarilla Apache society. Publications of the Frederick Webb Hodge Anniversary Fund (Vol. 5). Los Angeles: The Southwest Museum Administrator of the Fund. 
  6. ^ Aggie-horticulture.edu—Texas Native Plants Database: Mariola (Parthenium incanum)

External links[edit]