Parvez Imroz

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Parvez Imroz is a Kashmiri human rights lawyer and a civil rights activist in Srinagar, the capital of the Jammu and Kashmir. He is founder and President of the Jammu and Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society (JKCCS) that works to build local alliances between Kashmiri civil society groups, runs advocacy campaigns, documents rights violations and provides legal assistance to victims.[1][2]

He is also convener of International People's Tribunal on Human Rights and Justice in Indian-administered Kashmir alongside Angana Chatterji, Gautam Navlakha and Zaheer-Ud-Din.[3] He was awarded the eleventh Ludovic-Trarieux International Human Rights Prize by Human Rights Institute of The Bar of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France and the European Bar Human Rights Institute (IDHAE), that was first given to Nelson Mandela.[4][5]

He has filed thousands of habeas corpus actions on behalf of families who claimed their relatives had vanished while in the custody of the Indian security forces. In 2008, along with his team, he first discovered the huge number of mass graves in J&K. Reportedly his group exposed more than 7,000 mass graves in the region over the years, on which no action has yet been taken by the government.[5][2]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Q&A: 'Element of fear is gone' for Kashmir's youth". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 2017-04-22. 
  2. ^ a b Fahad Shah. "Exposed: India’s Silence Over Human Rights Violations in Kashmir". The Diplomat. Retrieved 2017-04-22. 
  3. ^ "Conveners, Legal Counsel, and Liaison". kashmirprocess.org. Retrieved 2017-04-22. 
  4. ^ "Parvez IMROZ - Ludovic-Trarieux International Human Rights Prize 2006". ludovictrarieux.org. Retrieved 2017-04-22. 
  5. ^ a b Scott-Clark, Cathy (2012-07-09). "The mass graves of Kashmir". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-04-22.