Pat Duff

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Pat Duff
Pinch hitter
Born: (1875-05-06)May 6, 1875
Providence, Rhode Island
Died: September 11, 1925(1925-09-11) (aged 50)
Providence, Rhode Island
Batted: Right Threw: Unknown
MLB debut
April 16, 1906, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
April 16, 1906, for the Washington Senators
MLB statistics
At bats 1
Hits 0
Teams

Patrick Henry Duff (May 6, 1875 – September 11, 1925) was an Irish American professional baseball player. Duff played one game in Major League Baseball, and in one at bat he didn't compile a hit. Despite his limited playing time in the majors, Duff's minor league career spanned eight nonconsecutive seasons.

Early life[edit]

Duff was born in Providence, Rhode Island on May 6, 1875, though 1890 United States Census records suggests he was born in 1876.[1] His father, Patrick Duff, was born in Ireland in 1830, and worked as a laborer.[2] Duff's mother was also from Ireland.[3] Duff attended Manhattan College from 1901–1904.[3]

Professional career[edit]

In 1897, Duff began his professional career with the Class-B Fall River Indians of the New England League. With the Indians, Duff got no hits in 3 at-bats.[4] Duff played with the Class-F New Haven Blues, and the Class-F Norwich Witches of the Connecticut State League in 1901 after a three-year absence in professional baseball.[4] He batted .260 with 82 hits, 14 doubles, 6 triples, 7 home runs, and 20 stolen bases that season.[4] On the season, Duff was tied for sixth in the league in home runs along with Thomas Ivers, and Bob Unglaub.[5] The next season, Duff again played for the New Haven Blues, and the Norwich Witches, however, his stats for that season were not kept.[4] Duff also played for the Class-A Syracuse Stars of the Eastern League in 1901, but did not play.[4] In 1904, Duff played for the All-Americans of the Cuban League playing first base on a team that included multiple major leaguers.[6]

After another three-year absence from pro-baseball, Duff played for the Class-AA Minneapolis Millers, and the Class-AA Indianapolis Indians of the American Association in 1905.[4] In 22 games that season, Duff batted .176 with 13 hits, and 3 doubles.[4] In 1906, Duff played his only season in Major League Baseball with the Washington Senators.[7] In only 1 games, Duff did not get a hit in 1 at-bat.[7] The next season, Duff played for the Class-B York White Roses/Reading Pretzels, and the Class-B Johnstown Johnnies of the Tri-State League. In 100 games that season, Duff batted .204 with 68 hits, and 11 doubles, 3 triples, and 1 home run.[4] In 1908, Duff played for the Class-B New Bedford Whalers, and the Lowell Tigers of the New England League. He batted .243 with 99 hits, 13 doubles, 1 triple, and 1 home run in 117 games.[4] Duff played the 1909 season with the Class-B Haverhill Hustlers, and the Class-B Brockton Tigers of the New England League. In 78 games, Duff batted .226 with 60 hits, 8 doubles, 3 triples, and 1 home run.[4] Duff's final season in professional baseball came in 1910 when he was at the age of 35. In 13 games with the Class-D Norwich Bonbons/Meriden Doublins of the Connecticut Association, Duff batted .357 with 15 hits.[4]

Later life[edit]

Duff died in Providence, Rhode Island on September 11, 1925 at the age of 50.[7] He was buried St. Ann Cemetery in Cranston, Rhode Island.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Individual Record: Patrick H. Duff". Family Search. familysearch.org. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Individual Record: Patrick Duff". Family Search. familysearch.org. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Manhattan College Baseball Players Who Made it to the Major Leagues". Baseball Almanac. baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Pat Duff Minors Player Page". Baseball-Reference. baseball-reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  5. ^ "1900 Connecticut State League Batting Leaders". Baseball-Reference. baseball-reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  6. ^ Figueredo, Jorge S. (2003). Cuban baseball: a statistical history, 1878-1961. McFarland. p. 56. ISBN 9780786412501. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 
  7. ^ a b c d "Pat Duff Player Page". Baseball-Reference. baseball-reference.com. Retrieved March 28, 2010. 

External links[edit]