Pat Farmer (soccer)

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Patrick Farmer
Sport(s)Soccer
Current position
TitleHead coach
TeamCornell
ConferenceIvy League
Biographical details
Born1949 (age 68–69)
United States New York, United States of America
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1987–1993Ithaca
1994–2000Penn State
2001–2002New York Power
2003Tennessee Tech
2004–2007Syracuse
2012–2016Cornell
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Big Ten (1997, 1998, 1999)
Awards
1999 NSCAA/Adidas Division I National Coach of the Year
1999 Mid-Atlantic Region NSCAA / Adidas Division I Coach of the Year
1998 Soccer Times Division I National Coach of the Year
1999 Soccer Buzz Mid-Atlantic Region Coach of the Year
1998 Mid-Atlantic Region NSCAA/Umbro Division I Coach of the Year
1998 Big Ten Conference Coach of the Year
1998 Soccer Buzz Mid-Atlantic Region Coach of the Year
1998 Ithaca Hall of Fame Inductee
1996 Mid-Atlantic Region NSCAA/Umbro Division I Coach of the Year
1992 New York State Collegiate Athletic Conference Coach of the Year

Patrick 'Pat' Farmer (born 1949) is an American association football coach. He currently coaches the women's soccer team at Cornell University. He has previously coached teams at Ithaca College, Penn State, Tennessee Tech, and Syracuse University. He was also a coach for the New York Power in the Women's United Soccer Association, the first professional soccer league for women in the United States.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

A native of Old Forge, New York, Farmer was a letterman on the soccer, skiing, and track teams at Town of Webb High School. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees from St. Lawrence University, where he served as an assistant coach and then the head coach for the men's ski team and assistant coach for the men's soccer team.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

Farmer holds an NSCAA Premier diploma, a Prelim badge from the England Football Association as well as a United States Soccer Federation 'A' License.[1]

Ithaca College[edit]

Farmer was head coach for the women's soccer team at Ithaca College from 1987–1993. The Bombers made their first NCAA appearance in Farmer's first season as head coach. They later advanced to the national semifinals in 1988. His record during his seven-year tenure at Ithaca was 110-23-23. In 1998, he was inducted into the Ithaca College Sports Hall of Fame.[1]

Penn State University[edit]

In 1994, Farmer was hired as the first head coach of the new women's soccer program at Penn State University. His record at Penn State was 123-34-8 (.770).[2] Farmer was named the NSCAA/adidas Division I National Coach of the Year after the 1999 season, also earning the Mid-Atlantic Region coach of the year title for a third time.[1] He led the team to three straight Big Ten championships from 1998–2000.

New York Power[edit]

In 2001, Farmer left the collegiate level for the newly former women's professional soccer league, the Women's United Soccer Association. As head coach, he helped lead the New York Power to a third-place finish and the playoff semifinals that same year.[3][4]

Tennessee Tech[edit]

In 2003, Farmer was named head coach of the women's soccer team at Tennessee Tech.

Syracuse University[edit]

He returned to his home state of New York the following year to coach for Syracuse University.

University of Wisconsin[edit]

He later joined his former Penn State coaching colleagues at the University of Wisconsin as an assistant coach.

Cornell University[edit]

In 2012, he was named head coach of the Cornell University women's soccer program.

Honors and awards[edit]

In 2007, Farmer was named the 13th-winningest coach (by victories) among active NCAA Division 1 women's soccer coaches.[3] He has been named the National Soccer Coaches Association of America Coach of the Year at both the Division I and Division III levels.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Farmer has two children: a daughter, Courtney, and a son, Cord.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Patrick Farmer biography". Cornell University. Retrieved 11 November 2012.
  2. ^ "Farmer leaves Penn State for WUSA Power; Waldrum stays at Notre Dame". Soccer Times. Retrieved 11 November 2012.
  3. ^ a b "Patrick Farmer biography". University of Wisconsin. Archived from the original on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012.
  4. ^ "Patrick Farmer Resigns Post At Penn State". Pennsylvania State University. Retrieved 11 November 2012.