Patiala gharana

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The Patiala gharana (Urdu: پٹیالہ گھرانہ ‎), is one of the gharanas (singing schools or styles) of vocal Hindustani classical music, named after the city of Patiala, India. It was founded by Fateh Ali Khan and Ali Baksh Khan, was initially sponsored by the Maharaja of Patiala, Punjab and was known for ghazal, thumri, and khyal styles of singing. The most influential Patiala singer is Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan.

Characteristics[edit]

This gharana tends to favour pentatonic ragas for their ornamentation and execution of intricate taans. Ektaal and Teentaal are the most common taals chosen by members of this gharana. Besides khyal, exponents sing the Punjab-Ang thumri.[citation needed]

The special feature of Patiala is its rendering of taans. These are very rhythmic, vakra (complicated) and firat taans, and are not bound by the rhythmic cycle. Taans with clear aakar are presented not through the throat but through the naabhi (navel).

This gharana has been criticized for neglecting basic raga characteristics such as the primary development octave and for overusing ornaments and graces (thumri style) without considering the nature and mood of the raga.[1]

Exponents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patiala Gharana 'Profile' on Indian Raga website Published 12 June 2010, Retrieved 14 August 2019
  2. ^ Article on Patiala Gharana in Dawn (newspaper), 'Classical music has healing effect on listeners' Published 3 May 2008, Retrieved 14 August 2019
  3. ^ https://www.britannica.com/art/qawwali
  4. ^ https://sarangi.info/vocal/ashiq/
  5. ^ https://patari.pk/home/artist/Rustam-Fateh-Ali-Khan
  6. ^ https://dailytimes.com.pk/418463/ustad-ghulam-haider-khan-passes-away/
  7. ^ Sharma, Manorama (2006). Tradition of Hindustani Music (2006 ed.). New Delhi: A.P.H. Publishing Corporation. pp. 113–114, 160–161. ISBN 8176489999.
  8. ^ Ganesh, Deepa (20 March 2003). "His master's voice". The Hindu (newspaper). Retrieved 14 August 2019.