Patricia Urquiola

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Patricia Urquiola Hidalgo (born 1961 in Oviedo) is a Spanish architect, industrial designer and art director.[1]

Biography[edit]

At age 22, Urquiola left her hometown of Oviedo to attend the Polytechnic University of Milan in architecture. After graduation, she went to work at the studio of De Padova in Milan where she became the head of product design.[2] From 1996 to 2001 she worked for Lissoni Associati. She has designed products and furniture for companies including Alessi,[3] Cappellini,[4] Cassina,[5] Coalesse,[6] Flos [it],[7] Kartell,[8] and Moroso.[9] Her Step Sofa was shown at the Salone del Mobile in Milan.[10] Since 2015, she has been the Creative Director of the Italian furniture company Cassina.[11][12] Urquiola has also started designing clothing with her first fashion collection for Max Mara in 2022.[13] Also in 2022, Urquiola helped renovate and redesign the Haworth Hotel in Holland, Michigan.[14][15][16]

Reception[edit]

In 2011 she was awarded the Medalla de Oro al Mérito en las Bellas Artes and the Order of Isabella the Catholic by King Juan Carlos I of Spain.[17]

The New York Times has described her as: "possibly the most lauded and in-demand industrial designer in Europe, on par with Philippe Starck and Hella Jongerius".[2]

Museum Collections & Exhibitions[edit]

Her work has been acquired for the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York,[18] Philadelphia Museum of Art,[19] Vitra Design Museum,[20] and Musée des Arts décoratifs in Paris.[21] Her work has also been displayed in the following exhibitions:

  • 2013 “O’clock – time design, design time”, CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China.[22]
  • 2013 "Patricia Urquiola and Rosenthal, Landscape", Neues Museum, Nüremburg, Germany. [23]
  • 2017 "Patricia Urquiola: Between Craft and Industry", Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, USA.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Urquiola, Patricia (Spanish architect and designer, born 1961)". Union List of Artists Names - Getty Research. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  2. ^ a b Saval, Nikil (10 November 2015). "The Designer Who Doesn't Want You to Sit Down". The New York Times. Retrieved 29 May 2022.
  3. ^ Keller, Hadley (14 March 2017). "Delta Is Bringing Back Glamorous Travel". Architectural Digest. Archived from the original on 27 September 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  4. ^ Lubell, Sam (4 May 2021). "8 Items for Your Home That Do More Than One Thing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 25 September 2022. Retrieved 2023-01-22.
  5. ^ "The T&C Investment Portfolio: To the Manor Born". Town & Country. 4 October 2022. Archived from the original on 29 November 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  6. ^ Noe, Rain (10 August 2012). "Coalesse's New "Relaxed Work" Hosu Seating by Patricia Urquiola". Core77. Archived from the original on 9 July 2015. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  7. ^ Ilia, Eirini (28 October 2022). "flos blooms with patricia urquiola's lighting system 'almendra'". designboom. Archived from the original on 8 January 2023. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  8. ^ "Art of Storytelling - presented by Kartell and curated by STIR". STIR World. 2022. Archived from the original on 25 September 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  9. ^ Brillon, James (12 December 2022). "Patricia Urquiola creates lofty showroom for Moroso in Manhattan". Dezeen. Archived from the original on 6 January 2023. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  10. ^ Donna Dorian (May 2009). Patricia Urquiola: Emerging new diva, now first lady of design. Garden Design. 2009 (159): 86–87. Winter Park, Florida: Bonnier Corporation. ISSN 0733-4923.
  11. ^ Tucker, Emma (17 September 2015). "Patricia Urquiola named Cassina art director". Dezeen. Archived from the original on 27 November 2022. Retrieved 5 May 2022.
  12. ^ Brara, Noor (2022-04-21). "Near Milan, Cassina's Art Director Digs Through the Brand's Archives". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-05-27.
  13. ^ Waddoups, Ryan (13 October 2022). "Patricia Urquiola's Cocooning Collection for Max Mara". Surface Magazine. Archived from the original on 31 October 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  14. ^ Key, Pei-Ru (31 March 2022). "Patricia Urquiola designs Haworth Hotel in Michigan". Wallpaper. Archived from the original on 31 March 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  15. ^ Fongers, Kayleigh (12 January 2023). "Haworth launches new DesignLab ahead of 75th anniversary". Grand Rapids Business Journal. Archived from the original on 19 January 2023. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  16. ^ McKnight, Jenna (9 March 2022). "Patricia Urquiola renovates Michigan's Haworth Hotel". Dezeen. Archived from the original on 23 October 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  17. ^ Hudson, Jennifer (2008). Process: 50 Product Designs from Concept to Manufacture. London: Lawrence King Publishing LTD. p. 214. ISBN 978-1-85669-541-1.
  18. ^ "Patricia Urquiola". The Museum of Modern Art. Archived from the original on 25 May 2022. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  19. ^ "Patricia Urquiola (Search Results)". Philadelphia Museum of Art. Archived from the original on 20 January 2023. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  20. ^ "Patricia Urquiola". Vitra Design Museum. Archived from the original on 20 January 2023. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  21. ^ "Rechercher dans toutes les collections: Urquiola Patricia". Musée des Arts Décoratifs (in French). Archived from the original on 22 January 2023. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  22. ^ "Exhibition - O'Clock time design, design time". CAFA Art Museum. Archived from the original on 27 August 2014. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  23. ^ "Patricia Urquiola and Rosenthal". Neues Museum - Nürnberg. Archived from the original on 22 January 2023. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  24. ^ "Exhibitions - Patricia Urquiola: Between Craft and Industry". Philadelphia Museum of Art. 2017. Archived from the original on 22 January 2023. Retrieved 22 January 2023.

External links[edit]