Patrick Fischer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Patrick Fischer
NLA, HC Lugano vs. Genève-Servette HC, 18th October 2014 13.jpg
Born (1975-09-06) September 6, 1975 (age 41)
Zug, Switzerland
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 194 lb (88 kg; 13 st 12 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Left
Played for EV Zug
HC Lugano
HC Davos
Phoenix Coyotes
SKA St. Petersburg
National team   Switzerland
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 1992–2009

Patrick Fischer (born September 6, 1975 in Zug, Switzerland) is a Swiss ice hockey coach and former professional ice hockey forward who played briefly in the National Hockey League with the Phoenix Coyotes. He predominately played in his native country in the National League A. He is currently the Head Coach of the Swiss national team.

Playing career[edit]

Fischer made his professional debut at EV Zug of the Swiss National League A (NLA) during the 1992-93 season. He transferred to fellow NLA side HC Lugano in 1997 and won the Swiss championship with the club in 1999. After two years with Lugano, Fischer moved on to HC Davos, where he played until the end of the 2002-03 campaign. During his Davos stint, he won a Swiss championship in 2002 as well as the Spengler Cup in 2000.

He joined back EV Zug in 2003 and then in 2006–07 took his game to the NHL, joining the Phoenix Coyotes. He appeared in his first NHL game on October 5, 2006 against the New York Islanders and played a total of 27 games for the Coyotes.[1] After a short stint at SKA St. Petersburg of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) at the beginning of the 2007-08 campaign, Fischer returned to Zug. He retired on May 8, 2009 from professional ice hockey. He was named to EV Zug's Wall of Fame and had his jersey number 21 retired by the club.[2]

Fischer won a total of 183 caps for the Swiss national team and played in the 2002 and 2006 Olympic Games as well as in several World Championships.[3]

Coaching career[edit]

He started his coaching career in the youth ranks of HC Lugano and was named assistant coach of the club’s NLA team in 2010. He briefly took over as interim head coach in October 2011 after the sacking of Barry Smith. In 2013, he was named Lugano head coach and was relieved of his duties in October 2015 after collecting only 16 points from the 15 opening games of the 2015-16 season.[4]

Serving as assistant coach to Sean Simpson, Fischer helped the Swiss national team win the silver medal at the 2013 World Championships, and also joined the coaching staff for the 2014 World Championships.[5]

In December 2015, he was named head coach of the Swiss national team.[6]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1992–93 EV Zug NLA 1 0 0 0 0
1993–94 EV Zug NLA 32 3 5 8 14 9 0 2 2 6
1994–95 EV Zug NLA 36 10 18 28 30 12 2 3 5 14
1995–96 EV Zug NLA 36 10 17 27 24
1996–97 EV Zug NLA 43 20 18 38 26
1997–98 HC Lugano NLA 40 15 28 43 38
1998–99 HC Lugano NLA 45 11 17 28 73
1999–00 HC Davos NLA 44 19 17 36 107 5 2 2 4 0
2000–01 HC Davos NLA 42 13 27 40 54
2001–02 HC Davos NLA 38 8 22 30 36
2002–03 HC Davos NLA 44 17 21 38 87
2003–04 EV Zug NLA 46 12 23 35 70 5 1 4 5 0
2004–05 EV Zug NLA 44 17 18 35 64 9 2 5 7 12
2005–06 EV Zug NLA 44 21 32 53 72 7 2 4 6 24
2006–07 San Antonio Rampage AHL 4 0 1 1 6
2006–07 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 27 4 6 10 24
2007–08 SKA Saint Petersburg RSL 5 0 1 1 22
2007–08 EV Zug NLA 32 10 11 21 2 7 3 3 6 10
2008–09 EV Zug NLA 50 19 27 46 70 10 0 5 5 22
NLA totals 617 205 301 506 827 17 3 8 11 32
NHL totals 27 4 6 10 24

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Patrick Fischer Stats and News". NHL.com. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  2. ^ "Wall of Fame | EVZ". www.evz.ch. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  3. ^ "Patrick Fischer neuer Headcoach der Nati". eishockeyticker.ch. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  4. ^ "Hockey: Lugano se sépare de Patrick Fischer". rts.ch. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  5. ^ "Firepower and Swissness". www.iihf.com. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  6. ^ "Greatest Hockey Legends.com: Patrick Fischer". www.greatesthockeylegends.com. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 

External links[edit]