Patrick Marnham

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Patrick Marnham is an English writer, journalist and biographer. He is primarily known for his biographies, where he has covered subjects as diverse as Diego Rivera, Georges Simenon, Jean Moulin and Mary Wesley. As a journalist, he has written for Private Eye, The Independent and The Spectator among others. He served as Literary Editor of The Spectator and Paris correspondent of The Independent. His books have won the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award[1] and the Marsh Biography Award.[2] Along with Richard West and Auberon Waugh, Marnham was one of three signatories to a letter to The Times that called for a British monument to honour those repatriated as a result of the Yalta Conference, it was eventually erected in 1986.[3][4]


  • Road to Kathmandu (1971)
  • Fantastic Invasion: Dispatches from Contemporary Africa (1980)
  • Lourdes, A Modern Pilgrimage (1980)
  • The Private Eye Story: the first 21 years (1982)
  • So Far from God: A Journey to Central America (1985)
  • Trail of Havoc: In the Steps of Lord Lucan (1988)
  • Crime and the Académie Française: Dispatches from Paris (1993)
  • The Man Who Wasn't Maigret: A Portrait of Georges Simenon (1993)
  • Dreaming with His Eyes Open: A Life of Diego Rivera (1998)
  • The Death of Jean Moulin: Biography of a Ghost (2000)
  • Resistance and Betrayal: The Death and Life of the Greatest Hero of the French Resistance (2000)
  • Wild Mary: The Life of Mary Wesley (2006)
  • Snake Dance: Journeys Beneath a Nuclear Sky (2013)
  • Darling Pol: Letters of Mary Wesley and Eric Siepmann 1944-1967 (2017)



  1. ^ "List of winners of the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award" Archived August 31, 2005, at the Wayback Machine. Thomas Cook Publishing website, retrieved October 29, 2010
  2. ^ "List of winners of the Marsh Biography Award" Marsh Christian Trust website, retrieved October 29, 2010
  3. ^ "Yalta Memorial". The Spectator. 12 July 1986. Retrieved 30 January 2016. 
  4. ^ "Communist Victims/Twelve Responses to Tragedy". War Memorials Online. Retrieved 30 January 2016.