Patrick Perkins

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The Hon
Patrick Perkins
JP
StateLibQld 2 182083 Brewer and politician Patrick Perkins, 1879.jpg
Member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly
for Aubigny
In office
1 May 1877 – 21 February 1884
Preceded by Edward Pechey
Succeeded by James Campbell
Member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly
for Cambooya
In office
10 May 1888 – 6 May 1893
Preceded by New seat
Succeeded by Henry Daniels
Member of the Queensland Legislative Council
In office
23 May 1893 – 17 May 1901
Personal details
Born Patrick Perkins
(1838-10-10)10 October 1838
Cashel, County Tipperary, Ireland
Died 17 May 1901(1901-05-17) (aged 62)
Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia
Resting place Boroondara General Cemetery
Nationality Irish
Spouse(s) Mary Ellen Hickey
Occupation Brewer

Hon. Patrick Perkins, J. P., (10 October 1838 — 17 May 1901), nicknamed Paddy Perkins,[1] was a brewer and politician in colonial Queensland. He was a Member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly and, later, a Member of the Queensland Legislative Council.[2]

Early life[edit]

Patrick Perkins was born in a humble cottage on a small farm in the village of Clonoulty near Cashel, County Tipperary, Ireland.[3] He was the second son of Thomas Perkins, a farmer, and his wife Ellen (née Gooley).[4] He attended the local National School.[3]

Thomas and Ellen Perkins and their eight children (including Patrick) immigrated on the Persian, departing Southampton and arrived in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 9 April 1854.[2][5]

In 1861, he married Mary Ellen Hickey in Victoria. They had three children born in Victoria: Thomas Hector (born 1864), Edgar Colin Francis (born 1868) and Lilly Eleanor Perkins (born 1875).[4] They had two children born in Queensland: Patrick Harold (born 1878) and Helene Cicilia (born 1880).[6]

Business[edit]

Patrick Perkins was a miner and storekeeper on the diggings in Victoria in districts including Ballarat, Bendigo, Woods Point and Jamieson.[7] [8]

With his brother Thomas, he started breweries in Victoria and Queensland. In 1866, Patrick Perkins started the Perkins Brewery in Toowoomba. In 1872, he later extended his operations to Brisbane with the purchase of the City Brewery in 1872.[9]

In 1876, Patrick Perkins moved to Queensland in order to manage the Brisbane and Toowoomba breweries.[8]

Perkins also had interests in property and mining, including the Mount Morgan Mine and coal mining in the West Moreton area.[7][8]

He was considered a shrewd and successful business man.[8]

Politics[edit]

On 9 April 1877, Edward Wilmot Pechey, the member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly in the seat of Aubigny, resigned. On 1 May 1877, in a by-election, Perkins was elected in Aubigny, defeating Angus Mackay (the then editor of The Queenslander) by a large majority. He was elected again in Aubigny in the 1878 election and was appointed as Minister of Lands in the First McIlwraith Ministry from 21 January 1879 to 13 November 1883.[2][10]

Perkins was elected again in Aubigny in the 1883 election,[11] However, allegations about electoral fraud (including intimidation, bribery, and ballot stuffing) in the Aubigny election started to surface,[12] resulting in a petition to the Governor of Queensland detailing numerous kind of electoral fraud and asking to declare that the Aubigny election was void and that Patrick Perkins was guilty of bribery and corruption.[13] On 21 February 1884, the Committee of Elections and Qualifications ruled the Aubigny election was null and void and called for a by-election.[10][14] Perkins had denied any involvement in the alleged electoral fraud and the Committee of Elections and Qualifications did not disqualify him from re-contesting the seat, which provoked outrage in some quarters.[15][16] However, Patrick Perkins announced he would not re-contest the seat as he would be taking a trip to England.[17] James Campbell was elected unopposed at the resulting by-election on 4 March 1884.[10]

At the 1888 election, Perkins was elected in the seat of Cambooya on 10 May 1888, which he held until 6 May 1893.[2][10]

On 23 May 1893, Perkins was appointed to Queensland Legislative Council from 23 May 1893. Being a lifetime appointment, he served until his death on 17 May 1901.[10]

The house "Aubigny"[edit]

Aubigny, at North Quay, Brisbane, 1897, when Miss Lilly Perkins married Mr Randal McDonnell

In 1883 used his wealth to buy a palatial home at 273 North Quay, Brisbane, which he called "Aubigny" after the electorate that first sent him to parliament.[3] The house was originally built in 1870 by Samuel Davis, a Jewish businessman, and included a separate building used as Brisbane's first synagogue. Patrick Perkins used the former synagogue as a billiards room. In 1899, the Perkins family rented the property to the Criminal Investigation Department which used the house as offices and the synagogue as a photography room. In 1906, the house was sold to the Rev. Mother Patrick of the Sisters of Mercy to create the 20-bed Mater Misericordiae Hospital (now a tertiary hospital located at South Brisbane); the former synagogue being the hospital chapel. Once the hospital outgrew the house and relocated to the South Brisbane area where it still operates, the house was renamed "Loretto" and used as a hostel for Catholic girls; the former synagogue being the maids' quarters. In about 1939 the house was demolished to make way for the construction of a church for the Church of Christ, Scientist.[18] [19]

Later life[edit]

Late in life, Perkins was in poor health and moved to Hawthorn, Melbourne.[20] He attended the opening of the first Federal Parliament at the Royal Exhibition Building on 9 May 1901 and caught a chill which developed into bronchial pneumonia, from which he died on Friday 17 May 1901 at "Ingleborough", Berkeley Street, Hawthorn.[21] [22] On Saturday 18 May 1901, his funeral was conducted at the Roman Catholic church at Glenferrie, after which he was buried in the Boroondara General Cemetery in Kew, Melbourne.[23][24][25]

In 1928, the Perkins brewing company was bought by their rivals Castlemaine Brewery with new company being known as Castlemaine Perkins Limited.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Death of "Paddy" Perkins.". The North Queensland Register. Townsville, Qld.: National Library of Australia. 20 May 1901. p. 51. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d Mennell, Philip (1892). "Wikisource link to Perkins, Hon. Patrick". The Dictionary of Australasian Biography. London: Hutchinson & Co. Wikisource 
  3. ^ a b c "All About People". The Catholic Press. N.S.W.: National Library of Australia. 25 May 1901. p. 5. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  4. ^ a b Ancestry user: lynchfamilytrust. "Patrick Perkins". Castle amine [sic] Perkins family tree. Ancestry.com. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  5. ^ "Victoria, Australia, Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists, 1839–1923". Ancestry.com. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  6. ^ "Search birth historical records". Queensland Government. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "People.". The Barrier Miner. Broken Hill, N.S.W.: National Library of Australia. 22 May 1901. p. 2. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c d "Death of the Hon. P. Perkins.". The Queenslander. Brisbane: National Library of Australia. 25 May 1901. p. 1018. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  9. ^ a b "Castlemaine Perkins (Fourex) Brewery". Explore Australia Publishing. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  10. ^ a b c d e "Queensland Register of Members of the Legislative Assembly & Council" (PDF). Retrieved 1 July 2013. 
  11. ^ "Queensland News.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 21 August 1883. p. 5. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  12. ^ "How the Elections have been Conducted.". Warwick Examiner and Times. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 3 October 1883. p. 2. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  13. ^ "Petition Against the Return of Mr. Perkins.". Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald & General Advertiser. National Library of Australia. 20 October 1883. p. 2. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  14. ^ "Local and General News.". Warwick Examiner and Times. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 23 February 1884. p. 2. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  15. ^ "The Brisbane Courier". The Brisbane Courier. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 26 February 1884. p. 4. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  16. ^ "The Brisbane Courier.". The Brisbane Courier. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 28 February 1884. p. 4. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  17. ^ "Queensland News.". The Evening News. Sydney: National Library of Australia. 29 February 1884. p. 2. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  18. ^ "BRISBANE'S HISTORIC HOMES.". The Queenslander. National Library of Australia. 11 December 1930. p. 46. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  19. ^ Unidentified (1905), Aubigny a residence in North Quay, ca. 1905, John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland, retrieved 25 January 2014 
  20. ^ "Items of News.". Kalgoorlie Miner. W.A.: National Library of Australia. 18 May 1901. p. 4. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  21. ^ "VICTORIA.". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 21 May 1901. p. 5. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  22. ^ "Death of Hon. P. Perkins.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 18 May 1901. p. 4. Retrieved 27 August 2014. 
  23. ^ "Family Notices.". The Argus. Melbourne: National Library of Australia. 18 May 1901. p. 9. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  24. ^ "Death of an Old Colonist.". The Albury Banner and Wodonga Express. N.S.W.: National Library of Australia. 24 May 1901. p. 29. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  25. ^ "Perkins, Patrick". Find a Grave. Boroondara General Cemetery Trust. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
Parliament of Queensland
Preceded by
Edward Pechey
Member for Aubigny
1877–1884
Succeeded by
James Campbell
New seat Member for Cambooya
1888–1893
Succeeded by
Henry Daniels