Patsy Tebeau

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Patsy Tebeau
Patsy Tebeau.jpg
Tebeau in 1893
First baseman / Third baseman / Manager
Born: (1864-12-05)December 5, 1864
St. Louis, Missouri
Died: May 16, 1918(1918-05-16) (aged 53)
St. Louis, Missouri
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 20, 1887, for the Chicago White Stockings
Last MLB appearance
June 12, 1900, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.279
Home runs27
Runs batted in735
Managerial record726–583
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Oliver Wendell "Patsy" Tebeau (December 5, 1864 – May 16, 1918) was an American first baseman, third baseman, and manager in Major League Baseball.[1]

Career[edit]

Tebeau was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1864. His brother, George Tebeau, was also an MLB player.[1]

Patsy started his professional baseball career with the Western League's St. Joseph Reds in 1886. The following season, while playing for Denver of the WL, he had a .424 batting average in 94 games.[2] Tebeau made his major league debut with the National League's Chicago White Stockings in September of that year. In 20 games with Chicago, he batted .162.[1] He then played in the Western Association in 1888.[2] In 1889, Tebeau joined the NL's Cleveland Spiders and batted .282.[1] The following year, he was a player-manager for the Cleveland Infants of the Players' League. In 1891, Tebeau returned to the Spiders and was a player-manager for the team until 1898.[3] His lowest batting average with the Spiders was .244 in 1892, and his highest was .329 in 1893.[1] The Spiders never finished a full season in first place in the National League, but Tebeau's team benefited from the season structure in 1892, 1895 and 1896; the 1892 season was a split-season that found Cleveland as the winner of the second half and the right to play in the World's Championship Series (the pre-modern postseason before the World Series). They would compete in the next rendition of postseason play in the League with the Temple Cup that matched the first and second place teams, and Cleveland would win once.[3]

In March 1899, the Spiders assigned Tebeau to the St. Louis Perfectos.[1] He managed the team before quitting in the middle of the 1900 season.[4] Tebeau is one of just over a dozen managers to have won at least 400 games in the 19th century.

In his 13-year MLB career, Tebeau played 1,167 games and batted .279 with 27 home runs and 735 runs batted in.[1] His managing record was 726–583–30.[3] He was known for verbally abusing umpires and opposing players, for which he was criticized by journalists.[4]

After retiring from baseball, Tebeau ran a saloon in St. Louis. His wife left him, and in 1918, he committed suicide by shooting himself in the head.[4]

Managerial record[edit]

Team Year Regular season Postseason
Games Won Lost Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
CLE 1890 52 21 30 .412 7th in PL
CLE 1891 73 31 40 .437 5th in NL
CLE 1892 74 40 33 .548 5th in NL - - - -
79 53 23 .697 1st in NL 0 5 .000[a] Lost World Series (BOS)
CLE 1893 129 73 55 .570 3rd in NL
CLE 1894 130 68 61 .527 6th in NL
CLE 1895 132 84 46 .646 2nd in NL 4 1 .800 Won Temple Cup (BAL)
CLE 1896 135 80 48 .625 2nd in NL 0 4 .000 Lost Temple Cup (BAL)
CLE 1897 132 69 62 .527 5th in NL
CLE 1898 156 81 68 .544 5th in NL
STL 1899 155 84 67 .556 5th in NL
STL 1900 92 42 50 .457 (resigned)
Total 1,339[b] 726 583 .555 4 10 .400

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Patsy Tebeau Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Patsy Tebeau Register Statistics & History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c "Patsy Tebeau Managerial Record". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  4. ^ a b c Scheinin, Richard (1994). Field of Screams. W. W. Norton & Company. pp. 75–79.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Game 1 ended in a tie
  2. ^ Tebeau also managed in 30 games that ended in ties

External links[edit]