Paul Barbarin

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Paul Barbarin
Barbarin, left, plays drums with a band on Rampart Street in New Orleans, 1919. Also pictured are (left to right): Arnold Metoyer, trumpet; Luis Russel, piano; Willie Santiago, banjo; Albert Nicholas, saxophones and clarinet.
Barbarin, left, plays drums with a band on Rampart Street in New Orleans, 1919. Also pictured are (left to right): Arnold Metoyer, trumpet; Luis Russel, piano; Willie Santiago, banjo; Albert Nicholas, saxophones and clarinet.
Background information
Birth nameAdolphe Paul Barbarin
Born(1899-05-05)May 5, 1899
New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
DiedFebruary 17, 1969(1969-02-17) (aged 69)
New Orleans
GenresJazz
Occupation(s)Musician, composer
Instrument(s)Drums

Adolphe Paul Barbarin (May 5, 1899 – February 17, 1969) was an American jazz drummer from New Orleans.[1]

Career[edit]

Barbarin grew up in New Orleans in a family of musicians, including his father, three of his brothers, and his nephew (Danny Barker).[1] He was a member of the Silver Leaf Orchestra and the Young Olympia Band. He moved to Chicago in 1917 and worked with Freddie Keppard and Jimmie Noone.[1] From 1925–1927, he was a member of King Oliver's band.[1] During the following year, he moved to New York City and played in Luis Russell's band for about four years.[1] He left Russell and worked as a freelance musician, but he returned to Russell's band when it supported Louis Armstrong.[1] For a brief time beginning in 1942, he worked for Red Allen's sextet, with Sidney Bechet in 1944 and Art Hodes in 1953.[1] In 1955, he founded the Onward Brass Band in New Orleans.[1] He spent the rest of his life as the leader of that band.[2]

Barbarin died on February 17, 1969, while playing snare drums during a Mardi Gras parade.[1] Record producer Al Rose said that his funeral "attracted one of the great mobs in New Orleans funeral history."[3]

Personal life.[edit]

Barbarin was Catholic.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Colin Larkin, ed. (1992). The Guinness Who’s Who of Jazz (First ed.). Guinness Publishing. pp. 29/30. ISBN 0-85112-580-8.
  2. ^ Yanow, Scott. "Paul Barbarin". AllMusic. Retrieved 8 July 2017.
  3. ^ Rose, Al (1987). I Remember Jazz: Six Decades Among the Great Jazzmen. Baton Rouge and London: LSU Press. pp. 218–220. ISBN 0-8071-2571-7.
  4. ^ "Death Of Louis Barbarin, 94, Cuts Link With Jazz's Past". Times Picayune. 1997-05-14. Retrieved 2020-12-03.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

External links[edit]