Paul Boyer (photographer)

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Paul Boyer (September 28, 1861–1952) was a French photographer born in Toulon (Var). He was the son of Charles Boyer, architect, and of Séraphine Grec.[1]

A student from École des Beaux-Arts (Paris), he invented the use of magnesium for the flash-lamp in photography, and got the gold medal at the Exposition Universelle of 1889.[citation needed] He also participated at the Moscow exhibition. He was nominated Knight of the Legion of Honor on December 30, 1891.[citation needed] At the Exposition Universelle of 1900, he was a member of the awarding jury. He was also decorated of officer des Palmes Académiques, officer of Nichan Iftikhar, officer of Lion and Sun. He had a studio at 35 boulevard des Capucines in Paris.[2] He made numerous portraits of actors, actresses, and other personalities of his time, often published on postcards.

He died in 1952.[3]

Gallery[edit]

Pictures by Paul Boyer:

References[edit]


External links[edit]