Paul Einzig

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Paul Einzig
Born1897
Died1973
OccupationWriter
Years active1897 - 1973

Paul Einzig (25 August 1897 – 8 May 1973) was an economic and political writer and journalist. He wrote 57 books, alongside many articles for newspapers and journals, and regular columns for the newspapers Financial News (which became Financial Times) and Commercial and Financial Chronicle.[1]

Einzig was born in Braşov, Transylvania[2] (then a part of Hungary, now Romania), into a Jewish family,[3] and educated in Hungary, England and France. He earned a degree as Doctor of Political and Economic Sciences at the University of Paris from 1921 to 1923. He moved to England in 1919, becoming a citizen in 1929. He had a wife, Ruth, a son, Richard and a daughter.[4]. He died in London in 1973.

Works[edit]

  • International Gold Movements, 1929; 2d ed. enl., 1931
  • The Bank for International Settlements, 1930
  • Behind the Scenes of International Finance, 1931
  • The Fight for Financial Supremacy, 1931
  • The World Economic Crisis, 1929–1931, 1931
  • Montague Norman: A Study in Financial Statesmanship, 1932
  • The Bank for International Settlements, 1932
  • The Tragedy of the Pound, 1932
  • The Comedy of the Pound, 1933
  • The Economic Foundations of Fascism, 1933
  • The Sterling-Dollar-Franc Tangle, 1933
  • Exchange Control, 1934
  • France’s Crisis, 1934
  • Germany’s Default, 1934
  • The Economics of Rearmament, 1934; reprint 2014
  • The Future of Gold, 1934
  • Bankers, Statesmen and Economists, 1935
  • The Exchange Clearing System, 1935
  • World Finance Since 1914, 1935. (American ed.: World Finance, 1914–1935, 1935)
  • Monetary Reform in Theory and Praxis, 1936
  • World Finance, 1935–1937, 1937
  • World Finance, 1937–1938, 1938
  • World Finance, 1938–1939, 1939
  • Economic Warfare, 1940
  • Europe in Chains', 1940
  • World Finance, 1939–1940, 1940
  • Appeasement Before, During and After the War, 1941
  • Economic Warfare 1939–1940, 1941
  • Can We Win the Peace?, 1942
  • The Japanese New Order in Asia, 1943
  • Currency after War: The British and American Plans, 1944
  • Freedom from Want, 1944
  • Primitive Money, in its Ethnological, Historical and Economic Aspects, 1949; 1951; 1963
  • Inflation, 1952
  • How Money is Managed: The Ends and Means of Monetary Policy, 1954
  • The Economic Consequence of Automation, 1956
  • The Control of the Purse: Progress and Decline of Parliament’s Financial Control, 1959
  • In the Centre of Things, 1960
  • A Dynamic Theory of Forward Exchange, 1961
  • The History of Foreign Exchange, 1962; 2d ed., 1970
  • Monetary Politics: Ends and Means, 1964 (new version of How Money is Managed)
  • The Euro-Dollar System: Practice and Theory of International Interest Rates, 1964; reprint 1967
  • Foreign Dollar Loans in Europe, 1965
  • Primitive Money, in its Ethnological, Historical and Economic Aspects, 2d ed. rev. and enl., 1966
  • Textbook on Foreign Exchange, 1966
  • Foreign Exchange Crises: An Essay in Economic Pathology, 1968
  • Leads and Lags. The Main Cause of Devaluation, 1968
  • Decline and Fall? Britain’s Crisis in the Sixties, 1969
  • The Euro-Bond Market, 1969
  • The Case Against Floating Exchanges, 1970
  • Parallel Money Markets. 1. The New Markets in London, 1971
  • The Case Against Joining the Common Market, 1971
  • A Textbook on Monetary Policy, 1972
  • Destiny of Gold, 1972
  • Destiny of the Dollar, 1972
  • Parallel Money Markets. 2. Overseas Markets, 1972
  • Roll-over Credits. The System of Adaptable Interest Rates, 1973
  • The Euro-dollar System. Practice and Theory of International Interest Rates, 1973

References[edit]

  1. ^ The History of Foreign Exchange | Book Reviews | EH.Net Archived 2013-10-19 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "The Papers of Paul Einzig". Janus. Cambridge University.
  3. ^ William D. Rubinstein, Michael Jolles, Hilary L. Rubinstein, The Palgrave Dictionary of Anglo-Jewish History, Palgrave Macmillan (2011), p. 241
  4. ^ Paul Einzig, How Money is Managed. London: Pelican, 1954

External links[edit]