Paul Hardy (illustrator)

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Paul Hardy in costume
Canterbury Pilgrims (1903)
Deer hunt (1892)

Paul Hardy (baptised David Paul Frederick Hardy) (2 August 1862 near Bath, Somerset - 2 January 1942 Storrington), was an English illustrator, well known for his regular illustrations in The Strand Magazine and his painting of Canterbury Pilgrims (1903), and his drawings were associated with the serials of the writer Samuel Walkey (1871-1953). Paul was the son of David Hardy, also an artist, as was his grandfather, all from an old Yorkshire family.

Early life and education[edit]

Paul Hardy received his education in Clifton, West Yorkshire. He settled in Chelsea, London in 1886, and married in 1888, whereupon he moved back into the country, living at The Cottage, Church Street, Storrington.[1][2] He designed and made the original galleon weathervane, now kept inside St Mary's church in Storrington.[3]

Paul was the son of David and Emily Hardy. He was married to Ida Mary Wilton Clarke Hardy (1862 - 1955) on 28 July 1888 at St. Matthias, Earl's Court, in Kensington and Chelsea, London. His son was Brigadier Gordon Paul Umfreville Hardy (1894-1974), who married Sophia H. Dickinson in 1917.

Work[edit]

Hardy exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1890 with His Majesty Henry VIII visits Sir Thomas More at Chelsea and again in 1899 with There it befell, that as they rode near a forest, they saw a damsel and her dwarf sore distressed.[4] These are the only Royal Academy Exhibition works attributed to Hardy up to 1905.

Hardy was a skilled metal worker and made his own replica armour. He was an advisor to both the Armoury Department at the British Museum and to the Auctioneer Sotheby's. In recognition of his work as a black and white artist, and his contribution to the study of medieval arms and armour, he was granted a Civil List pension of £80 in 1932. This was followed by a Royal Academy pension of £50 seven years later.[5]

Hardy illustrated at least 170 books in his career,[6] and was equally prolific with magazines. One of the juvenile magazines he regularly drew for was Chums, which he produced illustration for from 1896 to 1940, over 40 years.[7] One book that Hardy illustrated was The Story of Susan by Alice Dudeney (1903). (Hardy's affair with Alice Dudeney contributed to the separation of the Dudeneys in 1913)

Authors whose work was illustrated by Hardy[edit]

The authors whose work Hardy illustrated include the following (based on the list provided by Kirkpatrick:[8]

Example of story illustration[edit]

Rogues of the Fiery Cross was Samuel Walkey's (10 July 1871 – 29 March 19)[19][20] second serial novel. It appeared in Chums in the 1896 – 1897 volume and it was a huge success. It was illustrated by Hardy, as was almost all of Walkey's subsequent work in Chums.[21] After appearing in Chums Rogues was almost immediately published as a book by Cassell & Co., London in 1897 with sixteen full-page illustrations, as shown below:

Assessment of Hardy[edit]

Peppin says that Hardy was a prolific illustrator of adventure stories, particularly in Magazines. Hardy paid attention to historical detail including the rigging of ships and period costume. He maintained a collection of period costumes for his models to wear for his illustrations.[7] Houfe notes that Hardy was one of the artist's whose work proprietor George Newnes had on display in his two-room gallery at the office of [The Strand Magazine]].[22]. Houfe also provides an image of the Art Gallery.[23]

Houfe states that Hardy is at his bet in costume romances and adolescent series. . . Overall, he considers Hardy A prolific but unexciting purveyor of adventure.[24] However, Kirkpatrick quotes Brian Doyle in his Who's Who of Boys' Writers and Illustrators (1964) as saying that: Hardy’s work was at once distinctive and accomplished. The villainous characters who formed his pirate crews were faithfully portrayed and completely authentic, as were the nautical details of the old-fashioned ships he drew ... His characters invariably had staring eyes, turned-down mouths and were seldom inactive or in repose.[5] Cooper, who rarely comments on the quality of illustrations in the titles he is cataloguing, refers to Hardy's illustrations as Stylish.[25] The ultimate compliment is probably the way in which Chums, who had a huge stable of illustrators, kept using his work for over 40 years.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although Kirkpatrick gives a title she is credited with as having been illustrated by Willian Rainey, this seems unlikely as she was an illustrator herself.

References[edit]

  1. ^ john adcock. "Yesterday's Papers: Illustrators of the Strand". Archived from the original on 2014-04-13. Retrieved 2014-04-12.
  2. ^ "David Paul Frederick Hardy (1862 - 1942) - Find A Grave Memorial".
  3. ^ "The Storrington and District Museum - Famous Residents". Archived from the original on 2014-04-13. Retrieved 2014-04-12.
  4. ^ Graves, Algernon (1905). "Hardy, Paul: Painter". The Royal Academy of Arts: A completed Dictionary of Contributors and their work from its foundation in 1769 to 1904. III: Eadie to Harraden. London: George Bell and Sons. p. 389.
  5. ^ a b Kirkpatrick, Robert J. (1905-07-11). "Paul Hardy". The Men Who Drew For Boys (And Girls): 101 Forgotten Illustrators of Children's Books: 1844-1970. London: Robert J. Kirkpatrick. p. 197.
  6. ^ Kirkpatrick, Robert J. (1905-07-11). "Paul Hardy". The Men Who Drew For Boys (And Girls): 101 Forgotten Illustrators of Children's Books: 1844-1970. London: Robert J. Kirkpatrick. p. 196.
  7. ^ a b Peppin, Bridget; Micklethwait, Lucy (1993). "William H. Rainey (1852-1936)". Dictionary of British book illustrators : the twentieth century. London: Murray. pp. 138. Retrieved 2020-04-28.
  8. ^ Kirkpatrick, Robert J. (1905-07-11). "Checklist of Books Illustrated by Paul Hardy". The Men Who Drew For Boys (And Girls): 101 Forgotten Illustrators of Children's Books: 1844-1970. London: Robert J. Kirkpatrick. pp. 198–203.
  9. ^ "Author: Sheila E. Braine (born 1867)". At the Circulating Library: A database of Victorian Fiction 1837-1901. 2019-12-31. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  10. ^ "Author: Jennie Chappell (born 1857)". At the Circulating Library: A database of Victorian Fiction 1837-1901. 2019-12-31. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  11. ^ Kemp, Sandra; Mitchell, Charlotte; Trotter, David (1997). "Wynne, May". Edwardian Fiction: An Oxford Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 425-426.
  12. ^ Kirkpatrick, Robert J. (1905-07-11). "Checklist of Books Illustrated by Paul Hardy". The Men Who Drew For Boys (And Girls): 101 Forgotten Illustrators of Children's Books: 1844-1970. London: Robert J. Kirkpatrick. p. 198.
  13. ^ Lofts, William Oliver Guillemont (1970). "Cooper, Charles Henry St John". The Men Behind Boy's Fiction. London: Howard Baker. pp. 103. ISBN 0093047703. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  14. ^ Kemp, Sandra; Mitchell, Charlotte; Trotter, David (1997). "Moore, Dorothea (Mary) (1881-1933)". Edwardian Fiction: An Oxford Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 283.
  15. ^ Lofts, William Oliver Guillemont (1970). "Parry, David Harold". The Men Behind Boy's Fiction. London: Howard Baker. pp. 262-263. ISBN 0093047703. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  16. ^ "Fashionable and Personal". Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser (Friday 28 February 1936): 10. 1936-02-28.
  17. ^ "Wills and Estates". The Scotsman (Thursday 21 May 1936): 13. 1936-05-21.
  18. ^ Lofts, William Oliver Guillemont (1970). "Walkey, Samuel". The Men Behind Boy's Fiction. London: Howard Baker. pp. 340. ISBN 0093047703. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  19. ^ National Archives (1939-09-29). 1939 Register; Reference: RG 101/6818FD: E.D. WFJA. Kew: National Archives.
  20. ^ "Wills and Probates 1858-1996: Pages for Walkey and Year of Death 1953". Find a Will Service. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  21. ^ Lofts, William Oliver Guillemont (1970). "Walkey, Samuel". The Men Behind Boy's Fiction. London: Howard Baker. pp. 340. ISBN 0093047703. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  22. ^ Houfe, Simon (1978). "Fin de Siecle Magazines". Dictionary of British Book Illustrators and Caricaturists, 1800-1914. Woodbridge: Antique Collectors' Club. pp. 183. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  23. ^ Houfe, Simon (1978). "Figure 83: Image of The Strand Magazine Art Gallery in 1892". Dictionary of British Book Illustrators and Caricaturists, 1800-1914. Woodbridge: Antique Collectors' Club. pp. 182. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  24. ^ Houfe, Simon (1978). "Paul Hardy". Dictionary of British Book Illustrators and Caricaturists, 1800-1914. Woodbridge: Antique Collectors' Club. pp. 333. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  25. ^ Cooper, John (1998). "Florence Coombe. British". Children's Fiction 1900-1950. London: Routledge. p. 12.

External links[edit]

Media related to Paul Hardy (illustrator) at Wikimedia Commons