Paul Kendrick

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Paul Kendrick (born in 1983) is an author of popular history. With his father, Stephen Kendrick, Paul co-authored Sarah's Long Walk: The Free Blacks of Boston and How Their Struggle for Equality Changed America, which describes the legal case, Roberts v. Boston, brought on behalf of Sarah Roberts, a black child who was not allowed to attend any of the five "whites-only" schools she passed on her daily walks to school, and the effect this had on the effort to desegregate Boston schools in the 1840s.[1] The case led to the Separate but equal justification for segregation.[2] The book was named among the best non-fiction of 2005 by the Christian Science Monitor.[3]

He has also co-authored (with his father) Douglass and Lincoln: How a Revolutionary Black Leader and a Reluctant Liberator Struggled to End Slavery and Save the Union, to be published in December 2007.

As a student at George Washington University, Paul Kendrick served as President of the college's National Association for the Advancement of Colored People chapter and also as a Presidential Administrative Fellow. He is currently director of the Harlem Children's Zone's College Success Program. [1][4]

Publications[edit]

  • Sarah's Long Walk: The Free Blacks of Boston and How Their Struggle for Equality Changed America by Paul Kendrick & Stephen Kendrick. Beacon Press: Boston (2004). ISBN 978-0-8070-5018-7
  • Douglass and Lincoln: How a Revolutionary Black Leader and a Reluctant Liberator Struggled to End Slavery and Save the Union by Paul Kendrick & Stephen Kendrick. Walker & Company: New York (2007). ISBN 978-0-8027-1523-4

References[edit]

  1. ^ Walton, Christopher L (2005-05-01). "Ambitious first book at 21". UU World Magazine. Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations. Archived from the original on 2007-10-09. Retrieved 2007-10-05. 
  2. ^ "Sarah's Long Walk: The Free Blacks of Boston and How Their Struggle for Equality Changed America" (HTML). Beacon Press. 
  3. ^ "Best nonfiction 2005" (HTML). Christian Science Monitor. The Christian Science Monitor. 2005-11-25. Retrieved 2007-10-05. 
  4. ^ Skouras, Lindsey (2006-03-01). "PAF writes for a cause". The Daily Colonial. George Washington University. Archived from the original on December 14, 2006. Retrieved 2007-10-05.