Paul Randles

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Paul Randles
Born Paul Joseph Randles
(1965-12-16)December 16, 1965
Died February 10, 2003(2003-02-10) (aged 37)
Occupation Game designer
Nationality United States
Genre Board games

Paul Joseph Randles (December 16, 1965 – February 10, 2003[1][2]) was an American game designer who designed German-style board games.

Early life[edit]

Paul Randles was a native of Seattle, Washington.[3]

Career[edit]

Randles began his game development career Wizards of the Coast, where he worked on board games and card games including RoboRally, The Great Dalmuti and Xena & Hercules.[3][4] He worked as a brand manager at Wizards.[citation needed] Randles left Wizards to found his own game design firm, Randles Games, where he developed a number of games.[3] He designed Pirate's Cove with Daniel Stahl.[3][5] In 2000 Randles sold his first game, Pirate's Cove, to Amigo, the first company he and Stahl showed it to, and he became a respected game designer in the European market within two years.[6] His games Pirate's Cove and Key Largo (with Bruno Faidutti and Mike Selinker) were published first in Europe and then in the United States.

Health[edit]

About a year after leaving Wizards of the Coast, Randles was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.[5] He died on February 10, 2003.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JG9V-6M9 : accessed 3 February 2015), Paul J Randles, 10 Feb 2003; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).
  2. ^ "King County deaths". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. 2003-02-14. p. B5. 
  3. ^ a b c d http://www.daysofwonder.com/piratescove/en/content/authors/
  4. ^ http://www.thegamemechanics.com/freebies/helpware_paul.asp
  5. ^ a b Wiker, JD (2007). "Pirate's Cove". In Lowder, James. Hobby Games: The 100 Best. Green Ronin Publishing. pp. 240–243. ISBN 978-1-932442-96-0. 
  6. ^ Tinsman, Brian (2003). The Game Inventor's Guidebook. Krause Publications. pp. 133–134. ISBN 0-87349-552-7.