Paul Zollo

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Paul Zollo
BornChicago, Illinois[1]
OccupationAuthor, Journalist, Musician, Photographer
NationalityAmerican

Paul Steven Zollo (born 9 August 1958) is a singer, songwriter, author, journalist and photographer.

Journalist[edit]

Zollo was the editor of SongTalk magazine for many years,[2] and went on to become Senior Editor of American Songwriter magazine[3] and Managing Editor of Performing Songwriter magazine.[4] He has also contributed articles to many magazines including Variety, Billboard, Rolling Stone, Musician, Oxford Press, Playback, Gorgeous, Boulevard, Music Connection, and Campus Circle.

Personal life[edit]

His father, Burt Zollo, was also a writer, the author of three books (The Dollars & Sense of Public Relations [McGraw Hill], Prisoners, A Novel [Chicago Academy Press], and State & Wacker, A Novel [iUniverse]) and many magazine essays and articles. A former colleague of Hugh Hefner at Esquire magazine, he contributed to the first issues of Playboy magazine, including the inaugural Marilyn Monroe issue, under the pseudonym "Bob Norman".[5]

Paul Zollo currently lives and works in Los Angeles.

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Beginning Songwriter's Answer Book (1990)
  • Songwriters on Songwriting
  • Songwriters on Songwriting (Expanded Edition) (2003)
  • Hollywood Remembered (An Oral History of Its Golden Age) (2002)
  • Conversations with Tom Petty (2005)
  • Sunset & Cahuenga (A Novel)
  • The Schirmer's Complete Rhyming Dictionary. (2007)
  • More Songwriters on Songwriting (2016)
  • Angeleno: Caras de Los Angeles (A Book of Photo Essays)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Muse's Muse Interview, May 1998".
  2. ^ George Plasketes (2016). Please Allow Me to Introduce Myself: Essays on Debut Albums. Taylor & Francis. p. 212. ISBN 978-1-317-07974-3.
  3. ^ "American Songwriter Magazine Names Paula Zollo as Senior Editor".
  4. ^ Executive Turntable... Billboard. 2004. p. 38.
  5. ^ "Pitzulo, Carrie. "The Eternal Bachelor." American Popular Culture, January 2006".

External links[edit]