Paulatuk

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Paulatuk
Paulatuuq
Hamlet
The hamlet of Paulatuk in May
The hamlet of Paulatuk in May
Paulatuk is located in Northwest Territories
Paulatuk
Paulatuk
Coordinates: 69°21′05″N 124°04′10″W / 69.35139°N 124.06944°W / 69.35139; -124.06944Coordinates: 69°21′05″N 124°04′10″W / 69.35139°N 124.06944°W / 69.35139; -124.06944
Country Canada
Territory Northwest Territories
Region Inuvik Region
Constituency Nunakput
Census division Region 1
Incorporated (hamlet) 1 April 1987
Government
 • Mayor Ray Ruben Sr.
 • Senior Administrative Officer Greg Morash
 • MLA Jackie Jacobson
Area[1]
 • Land 66.86 km2 (25.81 sq mi)
Elevation 5 m (16 ft)
Population (2011)[1]
 • Total 313
 • Density 4.7/km2 (12/sq mi)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
Canadian Postal code X0E 1N0
Area code(s) 867
Telephone exchange 580
- Living cost 177.5A
- Food price index 195.9B
Sources:
Department of Municipal and Community Affairs,[2]
Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre,[3]
Canada Flight Supplement[4]
^A 2009 figure based on Edmonton = 100[5]
^B 2010 figure based on Yellowknife = 100[5]

Paulatuk[pronunciation?] is a hamlet located in the Inuvik Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. It is located adjacent to Darnley Bay, in the Amundsen Gulf. The town was named for the coal that was found in the area in the 1920s, and the Siglitun spelling is Paulatuuq[pronunciation?], "place of coal".[3]

The area has been inhabited by humans, including the Thule and Copper Inuit, since roughly 1000 AD. Most recently, it is part of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. [6] Paulatuk was incorporated as a hamlet in 1987 and celebrated the 50th anniversary of its settlement in 2015. [7]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1996 297 —    
1997 296 −0.3%
1998 304 +2.7%
1999 300 −1.3%
2000 311 +3.7%
2001 319 +2.6%
2002 314 −1.6%
2003 323 +2.9%
2004 305 −5.6%
2005 302 −1.0%
2006 305 +1.0%
2007 309 +1.3%
2008 314 +1.6%
2009 310 −1.3%
2010 327 +5.5%
2011 345 +5.5%
2012 329 −4.6%
2013 316 −4.0%
2014 304 −3.8%
Sources: NWT Bureau of Statistics (2001-2014)[5]

In 2014 the Government of the Northwest Territories reported that the population was 304 with an average yearly growth rate of -0.4 from 2001.[5] At the 2011 census, Paulatuk had a population of 313, an increase of 6.5% over the 2006 Census.[1] In the 2006 census 265 people were listed as Aboriginal and of these, 260 were Inuit (Inuvialuit).[8] The two principal languages spoken in Paulatuk are Inuvialuktun and English.[9]

Community[edit]

View down the Paulatuk Airport runway

The community is situated on Letty Harbour and was settled in the 1920s. This was followed a few years later by the Roman Catholic Church which opened a trading post. In the 1950s a Distant Early Warning Line site was built about 95 km (59 mi) to the northeast at Cape Parry, on the Parry Peninsula, providing a wage based income for the community. The trading post was taken over by the local co-op and today the local store is part of The North West Company.[9][10]

Hunting, fishing and trapping are major economic activities, but in recent years art printmaking has played an increasing role in the local economy.[9]

The Smoking Hills which are about 105 km (65 mi) west on the shores of the Arctic Ocean are a scientifically interesting object, since they are diminishing the pH value of the water areas. So the buffer effect has completely disappeared. Located to the east of the community is Tuktut Nogait National Park and Parks Canada has an office in the community.[10]

Notable Residents[edit]

Artists[edit]

Paulatuk artists are known across Canada and around the world for dance, music, sculptures, prints, and drawings.

Floyd Kuptana[edit]

Main articles: Floyd Kuptana

Floyd Kuyptana was born in 1964. He studied under David Ruben Piqtoukun and began solo work in 1992. He is a carver, sculptor, and painter.[11]

Robert Kuptana[edit]

Robert Kuptana was born in 1962. A carver since his youth, he studied under his brother Floyd and began professional work in 1998.[12]

The Paulatuk Moonlight Dancers[edit]

The Paulatuk Moonlight Dancers are a group of traditional Inuvialuit dancers. They have performed in Canada, the United States, Greenland, and Germany, and are led by Michael “Nolan” Green. Green also served as a hamlet councillor and received a Canada Youth Award in 2002. [13]

Abraham Anghik Ruben[edit]

Abraham Anghik Ruben was born south of Paulatuk in 1951 and lived on the land with his family until he was eight years old. He currently lives on Saltspring Island. [14]

His 2001 sculpture The Last Goodbye reflects Ruben and his brothers' experiences of being separated from their family by Canada's residential school system. Ruben writes, "I clearly remember when this took place—my mother sitting with my older brother and sister, David and Martha, just before they left for the Mission school in Aklavik. David was five years old at the time and Martha was only a little older. It was a scene that was repeated later on when my other brothers and I were sent off to residential school. But this time, it was sadder for my mother, because it would be three years that David and Martha would be gone. They left in 1955 and we didn’t see them again until the latter part of 1958. Those three years had a permanent impact on my brother’s life."[15]

David Ruben Piqtoukun[edit]

Main articles: David Ruben Piqtoukun

Piqtoukun was born in Paulatuk in 1950. A sculptor and print artist, he is also brother to Abraham Anghik Ruben and was a mentor to Floyd Kuptana.[11]

Mayors[edit]

A mayor has lead the hamlet since its incorporation in 1987, when the first mayor, Garrett Ruben, was elected. Ruben was also a community leader before incorporation. As a young man he worked near the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line site at Cape Parry, but the area was isolated and far from traditional hunting grounds. After leaving this work, he negotiated for the community locally and in the south and became Settlement Chair prior to serving as mayor. Ruben passed away in 2007 at the age of 72. The hamlet has formally recognized him for his 24 years of service. Ray Ruben, the sixth and current mayor, is his son. [16]

Other Figures[edit]

Anny Illasiak[edit]

Paulatuk elder Anny Illasiak, also known as Granny Uma, passed away in 2012 at the age of 74. A resident of Paulatuk since the 1970s, Illasiak was a leader in training children and young people to live on the land. She also organized a community sewing group, teaching others to make traditional clothing and creating tapestries herself, and volunteered as a cook with the Paulatuk Community Kitchen. She served as the Aboriginal language teacher for the Paulatuk Aboriginal Headstart Program for 10 years and continued to assist with the program after her retirement.[17]

Elizabeth Kuptana[edit]

Elizabeth "Liz" Kuptana, recipient of the Wallace Goose Award (given to those who have “shown beyond a shadow of a doubt, that he or she has unselfishly dedicated time, effort, and sometimes blood, sweat, and tears for the advancement and benefit of all Inuvialuit”) is a Paulatuk elder, teacher, and storyteller. She teaches children and youth about Invuialuit culture and language as well as the history of the Inuvialuit Final Agreement.[18] She was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2013. [19]

The Paulatuuq Oral History Project[edit]

Paulatuuq Oral History Project: Elders Share Their Stories was published in 2004. [20] Eight community elders, including Edward Ruben and Mary Evik Ruben, contributed to this record of the hamlet’s oral history, completing interviews transcribed by Cathy Cockney.[21]

Services[edit]

Services include a two-member Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachment and a health centre with two nurses.[22] Phone services are provided by Northwestel with Internet by SSI Micro and their AirWare service.[23]

The community is part of the Beaufort Delta Education Council[24] and schooling is available up to Grade 12 at the Angik School.[9][25] There is also a community learning centre operated by Aurora College.[9][10]

The community is not accessible by road but there is an airport, Paulatuk (Nora Aliqatchialuk Ruben) Airport, and flights into the community are provided by Aklak Air from Inuvik three times a week.[26] In the summer floatplanes can use the Paulatuk Water Aerodrome and an annual sealift is provided by Northern Transportation Company Limited from Hay River.[27]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Paulatuk (Nora Aliqatchialuk Ruben) Airport
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high humidex −1.4 −3.0 −0.7 9.4 21.8 29.8 33.4 29.1 22.7 15.5 3.2 1.3 33.4
Record high °C (°F) −0.9
(30.4)
−1.6
(29.1)
0.5
(32.9)
10.5
(50.9)
18.0
(64.4)
27.5
(81.5)
30.3
(86.5)
30.0
(86)
22.3
(72.1)
16.5
(61.7)
7.6
(45.7)
−1.5
(29.3)
30.3
(86.5)
Average high °C (°F) −21.8
(−7.2)
−22.2
(−8)
−19.2
(−2.6)
−9.4
(15.1)
0.0
(32)
10.3
(50.5)
14.4
(57.9)
12.2
(54)
6.0
(42.8)
−3.3
(26.1)
−14.4
(6.1)
−18.3
(−0.9)
−5.5
(22.1)
Daily mean °C (°F) −25.6
(−14.1)
−26.2
(−15.2)
−23.5
(−10.3)
−14.3
(6.3)
−3.9
(25)
5.9
(42.6)
10.1
(50.2)
8.7
(47.7)
3.3
(37.9)
−6.0
(21.2)
−17.9
(−0.2)
−22.0
(−7.6)
−9.3
(15.3)
Average low °C (°F) −29.3
(−20.7)
−30.0
(−22)
−27.7
(−17.9)
−19.1
(−2.4)
−7.7
(18.1)
1.5
(34.7)
5.7
(42.3)
5.1
(41.2)
0.7
(33.3)
−8.6
(16.5)
−21.3
(−6.3)
−25.7
(−14.3)
−13.0
(8.6)
Record low °C (°F) −42.0
(−43.6)
−44.4
(−47.9)
−46.9
(−52.4)
−36.8
(−34.2)
−31.0
(−23.8)
−6.4
(20.5)
−3.0
(26.6)
−3.2
(26.2)
−11.0
(12.2)
−34.1
(−29.4)
−37.5
(−35.5)
−38.7
(−37.7)
−46.9
(−52.4)
Record low wind chill −57.0 −56.7 −58.9 −45.7 −35.9 −11.4 −6.7 −7.9 −18.5 −50.4 −48.6 −53.1 −58.9
Average precipitation mm (inches) 12.0
(0.472)
10.3
(0.406)
13.3
(0.524)
9.5
(0.374)
14.4
(0.567)
14.3
(0.563)
21.9
(0.862)
34.5
(1.358)
24.7
(0.972)
25.4
(1)
18.1
(0.713)
14.4
(0.567)
212.9
(8.382)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
3.1
(0.122)
13.6
(0.535)
21.9
(0.862)
34.1
(1.343)
18.7
(0.736)
1.4
(0.055)
0.1
(0.004)
0.0
(0)
92.9
(3.657)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 14.2
(5.59)
10.7
(4.21)
15.5
(6.1)
11.3
(4.45)
11.5
(4.53)
0.7
(0.28)
0.0
(0)
0.4
(0.16)
6.1
(2.4)
25.1
(9.88)
19.3
(7.6)
17.1
(6.73)
131.8
(51.89)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 8.9 7.7 8.7 6.8 7.5 6.7 8.6 13.1 11.4 12.1 10.8 9.5 111.5
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.4 6.3 8.6 12.9 8.4 0.8 0.1 0.0 38.4
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 8.9 7.7 8.7 6.8 6.2 0.7 0.0 0.6 3.4 11.6 10.9 9.7 75.0
Average relative humidity (%) 78.7 77.4 80.5 75.2 69.9 78.6 79.6 82.5 80.2 76.9 78.0
Source: Environment Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010[28]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Paulatuk, HAM Northwest Territories (Census subdivision)
  2. ^ "NWT Communities - Paulatuk". Government of the Northwest Territories: Department of Municipal and Community Affairs. Retrieved 2014-01-16. 
  3. ^ a b "Northwest Territories Official Community Names and Pronunciation Guide". Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre. Yellowknife: Education, Culture and Employment, Government of the Northwest Territories. Archived from the original on 2016-01-13. Retrieved 2016-01-13. 
  4. ^ Canada Flight Supplement. Effective 0901Z 24 July 2014 to 0901Z 18 September 2014
  5. ^ a b c d Paulatuk - Statistical Profile at the GNWT
  6. ^ Parks Canada. “Tuktut Nogait National Park of Canada: History and Culture”, 14 November 2013. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  7. ^ Bickford, Paul. "Paulatuk to celebrate 50 years of local government", "Northern News Services", Paulatuk, 25 May 2015. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  8. ^ 2006 Aboriginal Population Profile
  9. ^ a b c d e "Paulatuk profile". Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories. Archived from the original on 7 February 2012. 
  10. ^ a b c Northwestel
  11. ^ a b Gallery Philip. “Floyd Kuptana – Artist Biography”, 2015. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  12. ^ Spirit Wrestler Gallery "Robert Kuptana", 2005. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  13. ^ The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. "Paulatuk Moonlight Drummers and Dancers" Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  14. ^ Ruben, Abraham Anghik. "Biography" Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  15. ^ Ruben, Abraham Anghik. [1] Retrieved 17 August 2015
  16. ^ Morin, Phillipe. “Paulatuk marks passing of first mayor, Garrett Ruben”, Northern News Services, Paulatuk, 18 June 2007. Retrieved on 17 August 2015.
  17. ^ Ryder, Kassina. “They called her Granny Uma”, “Northern News Services, Paulatuk, 30 November 2012. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  18. ^ Inuvialuit Regional Corporation. “Wallace Goose Award Elder Profile: Liz Kuptana" Retrieved 17 August 2015
  19. ^ Government of the Northwest Territories. “Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medals Presented in Beaufort Delta and Nunakput” Retrieved 17 August 2015
  20. ^ Cockney, Cathy, Parks Canada. Western Arctic Field Unit, Tuktut Nogait National Park Management Board (2004). Paulatuuq Oral History Project : Inuvialuit Elders Share Their Stories, Parks Canada, Western Arctic Field Unit, 2004, Ottawa. ISBN 0662364279, 9780662364276.
  21. ^ Fletcher, Erin. “Elders’ life stores”, Northern News Services, Paulatuk, 5 April 2004. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  22. ^ Infrastructure
  23. ^ AirWare
  24. ^ BEDC
  25. ^ Angik School
  26. ^ Aklak Air schedule
  27. ^ 2008 sailing schedule
  28. ^ "Paulatuk A" (CSV (3069 KB)). Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010. Environment Canada. Climate ID: 2203057. Retrieved 2014-01-09.