Paulsboro, New Jersey

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Paulsboro, New Jersey
Borough of Paulsboro
The Paul House
The Paul House
Map of Paulsboro highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Map of Paulsboro highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Paulsboro, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Paulsboro, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°50′24″N 75°14′24″W / 39.839975°N 75.23996°W / 39.839975; -75.23996Coordinates: 39°50′24″N 75°14′24″W / 39.839975°N 75.23996°W / 39.839975; -75.23996[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Gloucester
IncorporatedMarch 2, 1904
Named forSamuel Phillip Paul
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorGary C. Stevenson (D, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 • AdministratorSusan Jacobucci[5]
 • Municipal clerkKathy A. VanScoy[6]
Area
 • Total2.605 sq mi (6.745 km2)
 • Land1.896 sq mi (4.910 km2)
 • Water0.709 sq mi (1.836 km2)  27.21%
Area rank367th of 566 in state
16th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation20 ft (6 m)
Population
 • Total6,097
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
5,854
 • Rank342nd of 566 in state
14th of 24 in county[13]
 • Density3,216.4/sq mi (1,241.9/km2)
 • Density rank205th of 566 in state
5th of 24 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)856 exchanges: 224, 423, 467, 599[16]
FIPS code3401557150[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0885344[7][19]
Websitewww.paulsboronj.org

Paulsboro is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,097,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 63 (-1.0%) from the 6,160 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 417 (-6.3%) from the 6,577 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Paulsboro was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 2, 1904, from portions of Greenwich Township.[21][22] It was named for Samuel Phillip Paul, son of a settler.[23][24]

History[edit]

Paulsboro is the home of Fort Billingsport, the first land purchase made by the United States, acquired the day after the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence.[25]

Paulsboro is the location of the Tinicum Island Rear Range Lighthouse, first lit on the night of December 31, 1880. In 1997 a local citizen's group was established with the purpose of providing tours and public access to the structure. The lighthouse is one of New Jersey's few publicly accessible aids to navigation and is the centerpiece of Paulsboro's cultural revitalization.[26]

Aerial view of 2012 derailment

The East Jefferson Street railroad bridge over Mantua Creek was built in 1917[27] and rebuilt in 1940 for the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines (PRSL).[28] It is now part of Conrail's Penns Grove Secondary. On November 30, 2012 it buckled, causing seven cars of a freight train to derail. One of the four tanker cars that fell into the creek was punctured, leaking thousands of gallons of vinyl chloride. Homes in the borough had to be evacuated and dozens of people went to hospitals as a precautionary measure due to exposure to the chemicals.[29] Some residents in the area have filed suit against Conrail and CSX in Pennsylvania State Court having "complained about respiratory and bronchial related illnesses, headaches, eye and skin irritations and multiple other symptoms."[30] In March 2013, Conrail announced that the bridge would be replaced with an expected September 2014 operational date. Normally, between March 1 and November 30 the bridge is left in the open position for maritime traffic and closed when trains approach.[27] It will remain locked in the closed position until the bridge is replaced.[31][32] In September 2013, another less serious derailment took place along the Paulsboro Gibbstown border, with one car leaving the tracks on a train consisting mostly of empty tanker cars.[33]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.605 square miles (6.745 km2), including 1.896 square miles (4.910 km2) of land and 0.709 square miles (1.836 km2) of water (27.21%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Billingsport.[34]

The borough borders the Gloucester County municipalities of East Greenwich Township, Greenwich Township and West Deptford Township, as well as the Delaware River.[35][36]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880750
18901,13150.8%
19102,121
19204,352105.2%
19307,12163.6%
19407,011−1.5%
19507,84211.9%
19608,1213.6%
19708,084−0.5%
19806,944−14.1%
19906,577−5.3%
20006,160−6.3%
20106,097−1.0%
Est. 20195,854[12][37][38]−4.0%
Population sources: 1880-1890[39]
1910-2000[40] 1910-1920[41] 1910[42]
1910-1930[43] 1930-1990[44]
2000[45][46] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census counted 6,097 people, 2,286 households, and 1,591.056 families in the borough. The population density was 3,216.4 per square mile (1,241.9/km2). There were 2,533 housing units at an average density of 1,336.2 per square mile (515.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 54.49% (3,322) White, 36.72% (2,239) Black or African American, 0.34% (21) Native American, 0.71% (43) Asian, 0.07% (4) Pacific Islander, 2.35% (143) from other races, and 5.33% (325) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.89% (542) of the population.[9]

The 2,286 households accounted 33.9% with children under the age of 18 living with them; 33.7% were married couples living together; 28.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.4% were non-families. Of all households, 25.7% were made up of individuals, and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.16.[9]

In the borough, the population age was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.7 years. For every 100 females, the population had 88.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 82.4 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $43,846 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,449) and the median family income was $61,147 (+/- $5,392). Males had a median income of $51,923 (+/- $6,640) versus $37,826 (+/- $5,863) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,061 (+/- $2,252). About 8.2% of families and 12.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.[47]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 6,160 people, 2,353 households, and 1,614 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,140.8 people per square mile (1,213.5/km2). There were 2,628 housing units at an average density of 1,339.9 per square mile (517.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 63.56% White, 31.64% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 1.31% from other races, and 2.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.35% of the population.[45][46]

There were 2,353 households out of which 33.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.0% were married couples living together, 24.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.4% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.15.[45][46]

In the borough the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 19.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.7 males.[45][46]

The median income for a household in the borough was $35,569, and the median income for a family was $41,359. Males had a median income of $32,313 versus $24,779 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $16,368. About 14.6% of families and 17.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.0% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.[45][46]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Paulsboro is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 of 565 municipalities statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[48] The governing body is comprised of a Mayor and a Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Paulsboro is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[49][50]

As of 2020, the Mayor of the Borough of Paulsboro is Democrat Gary C. Stevenson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Paulsboro Borough Council are Council President John A. Giovannitti (D, 2022), Eric DiTonno (D, 2022), Alfonso G. Giampola (D, 2021), Larry Haynes Sr. (D, 2021), Theodore D. Holloway II (D, 2020) and Joe L. Kidd (D, 2020).[3][51][52][53][54][55]

In January 2016, the Borough Council selected Eric DiTonno to fill the seat expiring in December 2016 that was vacated by Gary C. Stevenson when he took office as mayor.[56]

Gary Stevenson was chosen in January 2012 to fill the vacant council seat of W. Jeffery Hamilton expiring in 2013, who left his seat after being sworn in as mayor.[57] Alfonso Giampola was appointed in May 2012 to fill the vacant seat of Paul Morina for a term ending in 2014.[58]

In 2018, the borough had an average property tax bill of $3,997, the lowest in the county, compared to an average bill of $6,851 in Gloucester County and $8,767 statewide.[59][60]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Paulsboro is located in the First Congressional District[61] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[10][62][63]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[64][65] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[66] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[67][68]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township).[69][70]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2020, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; 2021),[71] Deputy Freeholder Director Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township; 2022),[72] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2020),[73] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township; 2022),[74] Jim Jefferson (D, Woodbury; 2020),[75] Jim Lavender (D, Woolwich Township; 2021),[76] and Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2020).[77][78]

Constitutional officers elected countywide are: County Clerk James N. Hogan (D, Franklinville in Franklin Township; 5-year term ends 2022),[79][80][81] Sheriff Carmel Morina (D, Greenwich Township; 3-year term ends 2021)[82][83][84] and Surrogate Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 5-year term ends 2022).[85][86][87][81][88][84]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,635 registered voters in Paulsboro, of which 1,866 (51.3%) were registered as Democrats, 251 (6.9%) were registered as Republicans and 1,516 (41.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[89]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 78.8% of the vote (1,945 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 20.3% (501 votes), and other candidates with 0.9% (21 votes), among the 2,489 ballots cast by the borough's 3,817 registered voters (22 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 65.2%.[90][91] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 76.0% of the vote (2,059 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 21.6% (586 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (33 votes), among the 2,708 ballots cast by the borough's 3,958 registered voters, for a turnout of 68.4%.[92] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 71.6% of the vote (1,806 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 27.4% (691 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (16 votes), among the 2,524 ballots cast by the borough's 3,796 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 66.5.[93]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Democrat Barbara Buono received 55.0% of the vote (741 cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 43.9% (592 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (14 votes), among the 1,467 ballots cast by the borough's 3,630 registered voters (120 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 40.4%.[94][95] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 63.2% of the vote (1,031 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 23.3% (381 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.3% (102 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (11 votes), among the 1,632 ballots cast by the borough's 3,814 registered voters, yielding a 42.8% turnout.[96]

Education[edit]

The Paulsboro Public Schools serves students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprising four schools, had an enrollment of 1,205 students and 103.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11,7:1.[97] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[98]) are Billingsport Early Childhood Center[99] (351 students; in grades K-2), Loudenslager Elementary School[100] (291; 3-6), Paulsboro Junior High School[101] (163; 7-8) and Paulsboro High School[102] (317; 9-12).[103][104]

Students in ninth through twelfth grades from Greenwich Township attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Greenwich Township School District.[105][106][107] As of the 2017–18 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 317 students and 39.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 8.0:1.[108]

Students from across the county are eligible to apply to attend Gloucester County Institute of Technology, a four-year high school in Deptford Township that provides technical and vocational education. As a public school, students do not pay tuition to attend the school.[109]

Transportation[edit]

I-295 and US 130 northbound in Paulsboro

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 26.02 miles (41.88 km) of roadways, of which 22.58 miles (36.34 km) were maintained by the municipality, 1.62 miles (2.61 km) by Gloucester County and 1.82 miles (2.93 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[110]

Interstate 295 and U.S. Route 130 pass through the southern tip of Paulsboro[111] and Route 44 also traverses the borough.[112]

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit bus service is available between Pennsville Township and Philadelphia on the 402 route, with local service offered on the 455 route between Cherry Hill Mall and Woodbury.[113][114]

The borough operates shuttle bus service throughout the day.[115]

Port of Paulsboro[edit]

The Port of Paulsboro is located on the Delaware River and Mantua Creek in and around Paulsboro, and is traditionally one of the nation's busiest for marine transfer operations of petroleum products. From 1998 to early 2011, the Valero Energy Corporation operated an oil refinery here, which it sold in a 2010 deal to PBF Energy for $360 million.[116] The port is being redeveloped as an adaptable omniport able to handle a diversity of bulk, break bulk cargo and shipping containers. Studies completed in 2012[117][118] concluded that the port is well-suited to become a center for the manufacture, assembly, and transport of wind turbines and platforms for the development of Atlantic Wind Connection[119][120][121][122][123][124] The port has also been home to America's largest asphalt refinery, scheduled to close in 2017.[125][126]

Popular culture[edit]

The Kevin Smith film Jersey Girl is set in the Jersey Shore community of Highlands, but was filmed in Paulsboro.[127]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Paulsboro include:

References[edit]

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  3. ^ a b Governing Body, Borough of Paulsboro. Accessed May 13, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
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  6. ^ Clerk, Borough of Paulsboro. Accessed May 13, 2020.
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  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Paulsboro, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
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  27. ^ a b Automation of Movable Bridges Presentation by Conrail, American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way Association. Accessed November 10, 2019.
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  33. ^ Forand, Rebecca. "Train derailment near scene of Paulsboro crash raises fears, calls for regulations", South Jersey Times, September 16, 2013. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Less than a mile from where a train derailed and spilled a dangerous chemical into the air last November, a second train derailed Monday, reiterating calls for greater rail industry safety and regulations."
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  56. ^ January 26, 2016 Paulsboro, N.J. Special Meeting Archived August 16, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, Borough of Paulsboro. Accessed July 6, 2016. "Council President Giovannitti moved and Councilman Haynes seconded to receive, file the letter and appoint Eric DiTonno. Roll call: Ayes: Council President Giovannitti, Councilman Giampola, Councilman Haynes, Councilman Holloway. Nays: Councilman Kidd. Motion carried."
  57. ^ Bittner, Gina. "Paulsboro council appoints Stevenson as new member", Gloucester County Times, January 24, 2012. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Assistant Fire Chief Gary C. Stevenson will fill the council's open seat here.At a special meeting Monday night, Stevenson was welcomed into the council with a 3–1 vote (Councilman Joe Kidd voted 'no' while Councilwoman Elsie Tedeski was absent from the meeting).... Stevenson, a 28-year Paulsboro Fire Department member fills the spot left open by W. Jeffery Hamilton's move to mayor."
  58. ^ Bittner, Gina. "Paulsboro council fills vacant seat", Gloucester County Times, May 22, 2012. Accessed October 30, 2013, "Alfonso Giampola has filled the open vacancy on borough council. On a 3-2 vote Monday, members appointed the longtime borough resident and deputy fire chief to fill the vacancy left by Paulsboro High School Principal Paul Morina."
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