Pay Our Military Act

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Pay Our Military Act
Great Seal of the United States
Full titleMaking continuing appropriations for military pay in the event of a Government shutdown.
Introduced in113th United States Congress
Introduced onSeptember 28, 2013
Sponsored byRep. Mike Coffman (R-CO)
Number of co-sponsors4
Agencies affectedArmed Forces of the United States, United States Coast Guard, Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security
Appropriationsan unlimited amount in fiscal year 2014
Legislative history

The Pay Our Military Act (H.R. 3210) is a United States federal law that appropriates funds for fiscal year 2014 to pay members of the United States Armed Forces in the event that the federal government shut down. The bill was signed into law on September 30, 2013, only hours before the government officially shut down.[1]

The bill was interpreted by lawyers from the Defense and Justice departments to allow nearly all civilian Defense personnel to return to work as well, on the basis that they "contribute to the morale, well-being, capabilities and readiness of service members."[2]

Background[edit]

Due to the failure of the United States Congress to agree to pass regular appropriations before the start September 2013}}</ref> The Senate removed that provision every time it was added, and the two sides were unable to agree

Provisions of the bill[edit]

The bill would "appropriate funds to pay the military at any time in FY 2014 when appropriations are not in effect," a situation which would include any potential shutdown.[3] The bill would also allow "the government to keep paying civilian personnel and contractors that the Defense Department deems to be helping the military."[3]

Procedural history[edit]

The Pay Our Military Act was introduced on September 28, 2013 by Rep. Mike Coffman (R-CO).[4] The bill passed the House by 423-0 on September 29, 2013 in Roll Call Vote 499.[4] The bill was then sent to the Senate, which voted on September 30, 2013 to pass the bill by unanimous consent.[4][5] The bill was signed into law on September 30, 2013, only hours before the government officially shut down.[1][6]

Debate[edit]

Speaking in approval of the bill after it had been signed by the President, Representative Martha Roby (R-AL) said that "We showed with the Pay Our Military Act that there were some things too important to let politics get in the way of funding."[7] Speaker of the House John Boehner later pointed to the quick passage of the Pay Our Military Act only hours before the shutdown as an example of cooperation between Democrats and Republicans on an important issue when he argued in favor of additional cooperation to ensure that the National Guard and Reserves also would be paid.[8]

Effects[edit]

As of October 6, the Pay Our Military Act (POMA) was interpreted by lawyers from the Defense and Justice departments to allow nearly all civilian Defense personnel to return to work, on the basis that they "contribute to the morale, well-being, capabilities and readiness of service members."[9] Passage of the bill enabled Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel to recall 1,000 National Guard federal technicians in Indiana back to work.[10]

See also[edit]

Notes/References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Obama Signs Bill to Ensure Military Will Be Paid During Shutdown". The New York Times. September 30, 2013. Retrieved 1 October 2013.
  2. ^ Shanker, Thom (5 October 2013). "Hagel Recalls Most Defense Department Workers". The New York Times. Retrieved 5 October 2013.
  3. ^ a b Kasperowicz, Pete (September 28, 2013). "GOP releases text of 'Pay Our Military Act'". The Hill. Retrieved 1 October 2013.
  4. ^ a b c "H.R. 3210 - Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 1 October 2013.
  5. ^ Cox, Ramsey (30 September 2013). "Senate passes bill ensuring military pay during shutdown". The Hill. Retrieved 1 October 2013.
  6. ^ Chris Carroll; Leo Shane III (October 1, 2013). "Obama signs law to pay servicemembers during shutdown". Stars and Stripes.
  7. ^ Press Release (8 October 2013). "Roby: "Pay Our Military Act" Demonstrates Stopgap Funding Measures Can Work". WTVY. Retrieved 15 October 2013.
  8. ^ Press Release. "House Passes Bill to Pay National Guard and Reserves". Speaker of the House's website. Retrieved 15 October 2013.
  9. ^ Shanker, Thom (October 5, 2013). "Hagel Recalls Most Defense Department Workers". The New York Times. Retrieved October 5, 2013.
  10. ^ Schmidlkofer, C.M. (9 October 2013). "Indiana National Guard: federal technicians recalled to duty". Shelby News. Retrieved 15 October 2013.

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Government.