Peabody and Stearns

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Peabody & Stearns was a premier architectural firm in the Eastern United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. Based in Boston, Massachusetts, the firm consisted of Robert Swain Peabody (1845-1917) and John Goddard Stearns, Jr. (1843-1917).

Works[edit]

In Massachusetts:

In Rhode Island:

  • Frederick S. G. D'Hauteville House, 489 Bellevue Ave., Newport, RI (1871) - Burned.[3]
  • Nathan Matthews House, 492 Bellevue Ave., Newport, RI (1871-72) - Burned 1881.[4]
  • Weetamoe (Nathaniel Thayer House), 2 Rovensky Ave., Newport, RI (1872)[4]
  • Grace W. Rives House, 30 Red Cross Ave., Newport, RI (1875-76)[4]
  • The Breakers (Pierre Lorillard IV House), 44 Ochre Point Ave., Newport, RI (1877-78) - Burned 1892, later replaced.
  • Hillside (Arthur B. Emmons House), 300 Gibbs Ave., Newport, RI (1882)[5]
  • Vinland (Catharine Lorillard Wolfe House), Newport, RI (1882-83) - Now Salve Regina's Mcauley Hall.[4]
  • Honeysuckle Lodge (Josiah M. Fiske House), 255 Ruggles Ave., Newport, RI (1885-86)[4]
  • Midcliff (Caroline Ogden M. Jones House), 229 Ruggles Ave., Newport, RI (1886)[4]
  • Pavilion, Easton's Beach, Memorial Blvd., Newport, RI (1887) - Destroyed 1938[6]
  • Ocean Lawn (Elizabeth Gammell House), 51 Cliff Ave., Newport, RI (1888-89)[4]
  • Rough Point (Frederick W. Vanderbilt House), 680 Bellevue Ave., Newport, RI (1888-91)[4]
Edith Memorial Chapel, Lawrenceville School
  • Althorpe (John T. Spencer House), Ruggles Ave., Newport, RI (1889-90) - Now Salve Regina's Founders Hall.[4]
  • Episcopal Church of the Messiah, 1680 Westminster St., Providence, RI (1889-90)[7]
  • Rockhurst (H. Mortimer Brooks House), Bellevue Ave., Newport, RI (1891) - Demolished 1955.[3]
  • Parish House for St. John's Episcopal Church, 275 N. Main St., Providence, RI (1893) - Demolished.[8]
  • Shamrock Cliff (G. M. Gaun McRobert Hutton House), 65 Ridge Rd., Newport, RI (1894)[4]
  • Beechbound (William F. Burden House), 127 Harrison Ave., Newport, RI (1895)[4]
  • Bleak House (Ross R. Winans House), Ocean Ave., Newport, RI (1895) - Demolished 1948.[3]
  • Ridgemere (Fannie Foster House), 11 Leroy Ave., Newport, RI (1896)[4]
  • Hopedene (Elizabeth H. Gammell Slater House), 43 Cliff Ave., Newport, RI (1899-1902)[4]
  • Providence Journal Building, 60 Eddy St., Providence, RI (1906)[7]

In Maine:

In Pennsylvania:

  • George W. Childs-Drexel House, 1726 Locust St., Philadelphia, PA (1893)[12]
  • Nathaniel Holmes House, Morewood & 5th Aves., Pittsburgh, PA (1895) - Demolished.[13]
  • Harvey Childs House, 718 Devonshire St., Pittsburgh, PA (1896)
  • Sarah Drexel Fell House, 1801 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA (1896-98)
  • Durbin Horne House, 7418 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh, PA (1897)[14]
  • Joseph Horne & Co. Dept. Store, 501 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh, PA (1897-98)[15]
  • East Liberty Market, 5900 Baum Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA (1898-1900)[16]
  • Remsen V. Messler House, 651 Morewood Ave., Pittsburgh, PA (1900-01)[17]
  • Laurento (E. Craig Biddle House), Darby-Paoli Rd., Villanova, PA (1901) - Demolished 1980s.[18]
  • Penshurst (Percival Roberts House), Conshohocken State Rd., Lower Merion, PA (1901) - Demolished.[18]
  • Krisheim (George Woodward House), 7514 McCallum St., Philadelphia, PA (1910)[19]
  • Westview (Livingston L. Biddle House), Westview Rd., Bryn Mawr, PA (1917) - Demolished.[20][18]

In Missouri:

  • St. Louis Museum of Fine Arts, 1815 Locust St., St. Louis, MO (1879-81) - Demolished 1919.[21]
  • Unitarian Church of the Messiah, 508 N. Garrison Ave., St. Louis, MO (1880-82) - Demolished 1987.[22]
  • Turner Building, 304 N. 8th St., St. Louis, MO (1882-83) - Demolished 1902.[21]
  • St. Louis Club, T.E. Huntley Ave. & Locust Blvd., St. Louis, MO (1884-85) - Demolished.[21]
  • George Blackman House, 5843 Bartmer Ave., St. Louis, MO (1885)[23]
  • Alvah Mansur House, 3700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, MO (1885-86)[24]
  • Charles F. Morse House, 200 E. 36th St., Kansas City, MO (1887) - Demolished.[25]
  • Henry L. Newman House, 21 Westmoreland Pl., St. Louis, MO (1889) - Demolished.[26]
  • Security Building, 319 N. 4th St., St. Louis, MO (1890-92)[21]
  • Corinne Dyer House, 38 Westmoreland Pl., St. Louis, MO (1892)[26]
  • Edward C. Rowse House, 10 Benton Pl., St. Louis, MO (1892)[27]
  • John T. Davis House, 17 Westmoreland Pl., St. Louis, MO (1893-94)[26]

In Minnesota:

In New Jersey:

In D.C.:

In Georgia:


Images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peabody and Stearns website
  2. ^ Engineering Record 11 April 1891: 319.
  3. ^ a b c Miller, Paul F. Lost Newport: Vanished Cottages of the Resort Era. 2008.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Yarnall, James L. Newport Through its Architecture. 2005.
  5. ^ "Emmons, Arthur Brewster, Residence". http://digital-libraries.saic.edu/. n.d. Web.
  6. ^ Newport Historical Society. "History Bytes: Easton's Beach Pavilion". http://www.newporthistory.org/. 19 Feb. 2015. Web.
  7. ^ a b Woodward, Wm. McKenzie. Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources. 1986.
  8. ^ Brickbuilder April 1894: 60.
  9. ^ Murphy, Kevin D. Colonial Revival Maine. 2004.
  10. ^ a b Engineering and Contracting 7 Feb. 1912: 59.
  11. ^ American Architect 7 Aug. 1912: 14.
  12. ^ Architectural Record July 1896: 61.
  13. ^ Floyd, Margaret Henderson. Architecture After Richardson: Regionalism before Modernism: Longfellow, Alden, and Harlow in Boston and Pittsburgh. 1994.
  14. ^ Brickbuilder Nov. 1897: 257.
  15. ^ Brickbuilder Dec. 1897: 289.
  16. ^ Toker, Franklin. Buildings of Pittsburgh. 2007.
  17. ^ Engineering Record 1 Sept. 1900: 215.
  18. ^ a b c Morrison, William Alan. The Main Line: Country Houses of Philadelphia's Storied Suburb, 1870-1930. 2002.
  19. ^ Keels, Thomas H. and Elizabeth Farmer Jarvis. Images of America: Chestnut Hill. 2002.
  20. ^ American Contractor 26 May 1917: 55.
  21. ^ a b c d Security Building NRHP Nomination. 1999.
  22. ^ Unitarian Church of the Messiah NRHP Nomination. 1979.
  23. ^ American Architect and Building News 18 July 1885: 36.
  24. ^ American Architect and Building News 5 Sept. 1885: 120.
  25. ^ "Morse, C.F., Residence". http://digital-libraries.saic.edu/. n.d. Web.
  26. ^ a b c Hunter, Julius K. Westmoreland and Portland Places: The History and Architecture of America's Premier Private Streets, 1888-1988. 1988.
  27. ^ Bryan, John Albury. Lafayette Square: St. Louis. 2007.
  28. ^ Engineering and Building Record 31 May 1890: 415.
  29. ^ Lewis, Arnold. American Country Houses of the Gilded Age. 1982.
  30. ^ "The New Depot of the C. R. R. of N. J." Engineering News 6 Oct. 1888: 265.

Further reading[edit]

  • Wheaton A. Holden. "The Peabody Touch: Peabody and Stearns of Boston, 1870-1917." Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Vol. 32, No. 2 (May, 1973)

External links[edit]