Peadar Ó Guilín

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Peadar Ó Guilín
Peadar Ó Guilín.jpg
BornPeadar Ó Guilín
OccupationWriter
NationalityIrish
Website
www.peadar.org

Peadar Ó Guilín is an Irish novelist.

Life and work[edit]

Ó Guilín grew up in Donegal though he went to school in Clongowes Wood College in County Kildare.[1] He is now based in Dublin where he works for a computer company.[2][3] Raised speaking Irish and English, Ó Guilín is also fluent in French, and Italian. He has written a number of stories and novels. His first novel, The Inferior, was published to critical acclaim in 2007 and translations into nine languages including Japanese and Korean.[4][5] Before writing novels, Ó Guilín wrote a number of plays and worked on a weekly print comic with the artist Laura Howell, Sneaky, the Cleverest Elephant in the World, aimed at kids.[5][6]

The Times Educational Supplement called his first novel "a stark, dark tale, written with great energy and confidence and some arresting reflections on human nature."[5]

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Inferior. RHCP. 30 September 2010. ISBN 978-1-4090-4764-3.
  • The Deserter. Random House Children's Books. 13 March 2012. ISBN 978-0-375-98936-0.
  • Forever in the Memory of God: And Other Stories. Kindle. 15 February 2014.
  • The Volunteer. CreateSpace. 10 June 2014. ISBN 978-1499199529.
  • The Call. David Fickling Books. 30 August 2016. ISBN 978-1338045611.
  • The Invasion. David Fickling Books. 27 March 2018. ISBN 978-1910989647.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "PIAF 2017 Peadar O'Guilin". Retrieved November 23, 2016.
  2. ^ "Literature Ireland". Literature Ireland. Retrieved November 22, 2016.
  3. ^ "Peadar Ó Guilín Interviewed". Dublin city. Retrieved November 22, 2016.
  4. ^ "Dystopian Fiction with Peadar Ó Guilín – Irish Writers Centre - Dublin, Ireland". Irish writers centre. Retrieved November 22, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c "Strange Horizons - Serving Your Fellow Man: An Interview with Peadar O'Guilin". Retrieved November 23, 2016.
  6. ^ "Fringe Festival Reviews". Irish times. 1 October 2003. Retrieved November 23, 2016.

Further reading[edit]