Peasmarsh

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Peasmarsh
The Norman church of St Peter and St Paul, Peasmarsh.jpg
The Norman church of St Peter and St Paul, Peasmarsh
Peasmarsh is located in East Sussex
Peasmarsh
Peasmarsh
Location within East Sussex
Area15.8 km2 (6.1 sq mi) [1]
Population1,163 (Parish-2011)[2]
• Density191/sq mi (74/km2)
OS grid referenceTQ886229
• London50 miles (80 km) NW
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townRYE
Postcode districtTN31
Dialling code01797
PoliceSussex
FireEast Sussex
AmbulanceSouth East Coast
EU ParliamentSouth East England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
East Sussex
50°59′N 0°41′E / 50.98°N 0.69°E / 50.98; 0.69Coordinates: 50°59′N 0°41′E / 50.98°N 0.69°E / 50.98; 0.69

Peasmarsh is a village and civil parish in the Rother district, in the county of East Sussex in England. It is located on the A268 road between Rye and Beckley, some 3 miles (4.8 km) north-west of Rye.

The village church, dedicated to St Peter and Paul,[3] lies about one mile (1.6 km) from the village; it is thought the village centre was moved after the Black Death plague.[4] There are three public houses and a motel in close proximity to the village; and a country house hotel with a leisure centre. The village is also home to an independent supermarket, although the proprietors choose not to open their store on Sundays. Peasmarsh Place, now a residential care home, is to the south-east of the village.

Every year, in June, the Peasmarsh Chamber Music Festival, bringing world-class concerts of chamber music, is held in the church.[5]

Governance[edit]

The lowest level of government is the Peasmarsh parish council. The parish council is responsible for local amenities such as the provision of litter bins, bus shelters and allotments. They also provide a voice into the district council meetings. The parish council comprises nine councillors with elections being held every four years. The May 2007 election was uncontested.[6]

Rother District council provides the next level of government with services such as refuse collection, planning consent, leisure amenities and council tax collection. Peasmarsh lies within the Rother Levels ward, which provides two councillors. The May 2007 election returned two Conservatives councillors.

East Sussex county council is the third tier of government, providing education, libraries and highway maintenance. Peasmarsh falls within the Northern Rother ward. Peter Jones, Conservative, was elected in the May 2005 election with 49.7% of the vote.

The UK Parliament constituency for Peasmarsh is Bexhill and Battle. Gregory Barker was re-elected in the May 2005 election.

At European level, Peasmarsh is represented by the South-East region, which holds ten seats in the European Parliament. The June 2004 election returned 4 Conservatives, 2 Liberal Democrats, 2 UK Independence, 1 Labour and 1 Green, none of whom live in East Sussex.[7]

Notable residents (past & present)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "East Sussex in Figures". East Sussex County Council. Retrieved 26 April 2008.
  2. ^ "Civil Parish population 2011". Archived from the original on 13 January 2016. Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  3. ^ Morrison, Kathryn A (22 April 1989). "St Peter and St Paul, Peasmarsh, Sussex". The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland. The British Academy. Retrieved 28 September 2008.[dead link]
  4. ^ "Peasmarsh, East Sussex". DomainSupport ltd. Retrieved 28 September 2008.
  5. ^ "Peasmarsh Chamber Music Festival". Retrieved 23 July 2012.
  6. ^ Stevens, Derek (4 April 2007). "Notice of Election" (PDF). Rother District Council. Archived from the original (pdf) on 25 February 2009. Retrieved 17 November 2008.
  7. ^ "UK MEP's". UK Office of the European Parliament. Archived from the original on 24 January 2007. Retrieved 25 January 2007.
  8. ^ "Granny Smith and her Apples". Archived from the original on 11 August 2007. Retrieved 11 August 2007.

External links[edit]

Media related to Peasmarsh at Wikimedia Commons