Pefloxacin

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Pefloxacin
Pefloxacin.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-ethyl-6-fluoro-7-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-4-oxo-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 100%
Protein binding 20–30%
Metabolism Hepatic
Biological half-life 8.6 hours
Excretion Mostly renal, also biliary
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number 70458-92-3 YesY
ATC code J01MA03
PubChem CID: 51081
DrugBank DB00487 YesY
ChemSpider 46291 YesY
UNII 2H52Z9F2Q5 YesY
KEGG D02306 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:50199 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL267648 YesY
Chemical data
Formula C17H20FN3O3
Molecular mass 333.358 g/mol
 YesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Pefloxacin is a quinolone drug used to treat bacterial infections. Pefloxacin has not been approved for use in the United States.

History[edit]

Pefloxacin was developed in 1979 and approved in France for human use in 1985.[1]

Licensed uses[edit]

  • Uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis in males.[2]
  • Bacterial infections in the gastrointestinal system.[2]
  • Genitourinary tract infections.[2]
  • Gonorrhoeae. however this indication is no longer effective due to bacterial resistance.[3]

Pefloxacin has been increasingly used as a veterinary medicine to treat microbial infections.[4]

Mode of action[edit]

Pefloxacin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that is active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It functions by inhibiting DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase, and topoisomerase IV,[5] which is an enzyme necessary to separate, replicated DNA, thereby inhibiting cell division.

Adverse effects[edit]

Tendinitis and rupture, usually of the Achilles tendon, are a class-effects of the fluoroquinolones, most frequently reported with pefloxacin.[6] The estimated risk of tendon damage during pefloxacin therapy has been estimated by the French authorities in 2000 to be 1 case per 23,130 treatment days as compared to ciprofloxacin where it has been estimated to be 1 case per 779,600.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Patents/2008/2413.html
  2. ^ a b c http://www.pefloxacin.com/pefloxacin_usage.htm
  3. ^ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (April 2007). "Update to CDC's sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2006: fluoroquinolones no longer recommended for treatment of gonococcal infections". MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 56 (14): 332–6. PMID 17431378. 
  4. ^ http://www.pefloxacin.com/pefloxacin_other.html
  5. ^ Drlica K, Zhao X (1 September 1997). "DNA gyrase, topoisomerase IV, and the 4-quinolones". Microbiol Mol Biol Rev. 61 (3): 377–92. PMC 232616. PMID 9293187. 
  6. ^ Khaliq Y, Zhanel GG (October 2005). "Musculoskeletal injury associated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics". Clin Plast Surg 32 (4): 495–502, vi. doi:10.1016/j.cps.2005.05.004. PMID 16139623. 
  7. ^ Casparian JM, Luchi M, Moffat RE, Hinthorn D (May 2000). "Quinolones and tendon ruptures". South. Med. J. 93 (5): 488–91. doi:10.1097/00007611-200093050-00008. PMID 10832946. 

External links[edit]