Penn Manor School District

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Penn Manor School District
Map of Lancaster County Pennsylvania School Districts.png
Address
2950 Charlestown Road
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Lancaster County 17603
United States
Information
Superintendent

Dr. Michael Leichliter[1] Salary $165,000 (2014) Contract June 2014 to June 30, 2019[2]
Donald Stewart (2002-2009)
Dr. Gary Campbell (1996-2002)
Dr. Michael Moskalski (1996 – 2000)

Noel Taylor (1983 – 1996)[3]
Administrator

Cheryl Shaffer Asst. Super. Secondary Ed. Salary $109,234 (2012)
Vickie Hallock, Director of Elementary Education
Chris Johnston, Business Manager
Randy Wolfgang, Director of Support Services
Theresa Kreider, Director of Special Services
Kathy Grenier, K-12 Math Supervisor
Melissa Mealy, K-12 Language Arts Supervisor
Peggy Anastasio, Assistant Director of Special Services
Charlie Reisinger, IT Director
Carolyn Finegan, Transportation Coordinator
Carly McPherson, Title I coordinator

Brian Wallace, Community Education
Principal

Dr Philip B Gale , Principal
Dana Edwards, Manor MS
Christine Santaniello, Marticville MS
Carly McPherson, Ann Letort ES
Brian Malek, Central Manor ES
Tamara Baker, Conestoga ES
Jerry Egan, Hambright ES
Jennifer Sugra, Martic ES
Shirley Murray, Pequea ES

Krista Cox, Eshleman ES
Staff 314 (2012), 272 (2010)
Faculty 339 teachers (2012),[4] 384 teachers (2010)
Grades K-12
Age 5 years old to 21 years old special education
Number of students 5,069 pupils (2012-13), 5,169 pupils (2009-10)
 • Kindergarten 336 (2012),[5] 328 (2010)
 • Grade 1 351 (2012), 348
 • Grade 2 399 (2012), 342
 • Grade 3 380 (2012), 369
 • Grade 4 380 (2012), 401
 • Grade 5 357 (2012), 435
 • Grade 6 385 (2012), 390
 • Grade 7 418 (2012), 420
 • Grade 8 453 (2012), 432
 • Grade 9 417 (2012), 438
 • Grade 10 429 (2012), 465
 • Grade 11 444 (2012), 461
 • Grade 12 303 (2012), 366 (2010)
 • Other Enrollment projected to be 5,444 in 2015 and over 5,800 in 2020[6]
Color(s) Blue and gold          
Mascot Comet
Budget

$66,348,369 (2013-2014)[7]
$66,130,149 (2012-2013)[8]
$67 million (2010-2011)[9]

$64,685,934 (2009-2010)[10]
Website

The Penn Manor School District is a large, rural/suburban, public school district located in southern in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.[11] The Penn Manor School District encompasses approximately 110 square miles. Penn Manor School District serves residents of: Manor Township, Conestoga Township, Millersville Borough, Martic Township and Pequea Township. According to 2000 federal census data, it serves a resident population of 37,942. By 2010, the District's population was 41,376 people.[12] In 2009, Penn Manor School District residents' per capita income was $20,529 and the median family income was $55,708.[13] The educational attainment levels for the Penn Manor School District population (25 years old and over) were 88.7% high school graduates and 25% college graduates.[14]

Per school district officials, in school year 2007-2008, the Penn Manor School District provided basic educational services to 5,306 pupils through the employment of 386 teachers, 254 full-time and part-time support personnel, and 25 administrators. In 2011-2012, enrollment was 5,232 pupils. It employed: 373 teachers, 290 full-time and part-time support personnel, and 25 administrators during the 2011-12 school year. The District received $19,522,638 in state funding in the 2011-12 school year.

Penn Manor School District operates one high school, two middle schools and seven elementary schools. Additionally the District offers a virtual school and an alternative school for grades 7th-12th. Penn Manor School District is a member of Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit (IU) 13, receiving a wide variety of services like specialized education for disabled students and hearing, speech and visual disability services and professional development for staff and faculty. High school students may choose to attend Lancaster County Career and Technology Center for training: in construction and mechanical trades, in allied health services; and in public safety careers among others.

In 2011, Penn Manor School District agreed to participate in a pilot program to develop a new way to evaluate teachers that in part takes into account student achievement.[15] The pilot program had 104 K-12 entities, including: nine career and technical centers, nine charter schools and nine intermediate units. Beginning in January 2012, Penn Manor schools will use the new evaluation method and provide feedback to the Department of Education. The new evaluation will not be used to determine an educator’s official 2011-12 assessment.

Academic achievement[edit]

In 2014, Penn Manor School District ranked 184th out of 496 Pennsylvania public school districts, by the Pittsburgh Business Times.[16] The ranking is based on the last 3 years of student academic achievement as demonstrated by PSSAs results in: reading, writing, math and science and the three Keystone Exams (literature, Algebra 1, Biology I) in high school.[17] Three school districts were excluded because they do not operate high schools (Saint Clair Area School District, Midland Borough School District, Duquesne City School District). The PSSAs are given to all children in grades 3rd through 8th. Adapted PSSA examinations are given to children in the special education programs. Writing exams were given to children in 5th and 8th grades.

  • 2013 - 191st
  • 2012 - 228th[18]
  • 2011 - 207th
  • 2010 - 171st[19]
  • 2009 - 127th
  • 2008 - 117th
  • 2007 - 117th[20]

In 2009, the academic achievement of the students of Penn Manor School District was in the 46th percentile of Pennsylvania's 500 school districts. Scale (0-99; 100 is state best).[21]

District AYP status history[edit]

In 2012, Penn Manor School District declined to Warning Adequate YEarly Progress (AYP) status.[22] In 2011, Penn Manor School District achieved Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). In 2011, 94 percent of the 500 Pennsylvania public school districts achieved the No Child Left Behind Act progress level of 72% of students reading on grade level and 67% of students demonstrating on grade level math. In 2011, 46.9 percent of Pennsylvania school districts achieved Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) based on student performance. An additional 37.8 percent of school districts made AYP based on a calculated method called safe harbor, 8.2 percent on the growth model and 0.8 percent on a two-year average performance.[23] School District achieved AYP status each year from 2004 to 2009, while in 2003 the District was in Warning status due to lagging student achievement.[24]

Graduation rate[edit]

In 2013, Penn Manor School District's graduation rate was 95.6%.[25] In 2012, Penn Manor School District's graduation rate was 92%.[26] In 2010, the Pennsylvania Department of Education issued a new, 4-year cohort graduation rate. Penn Manor High School's rate was 94% for 2010.[27]

High school[edit]

Penn Manor High School is located on East Cottage Avenue, Millersville. In 2013, enrollment was reported as 1,589 pupils in 9th through 12th grades, with 27% of pupils eligible for a free lunch due to family poverty. Additionally, 17% of pupils received special education services, while 9.3% of pupils were identified as gifted. The school employed 112 teachers.[35] Per the PA Department of Education 3% of the teachers were rated "Non‐Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[36]

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, Penn Manor High School reported an enrollment of 1,639 pupils in grades 9th through 12th, with 379 pupils eligible for a federal free or reduced price lunch due to the family meeting the federal poverty level. In 2011, the School employed 112 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 14:1.[37] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 41 teachers were rated "Non‐Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[38]

2013 School Performance Profile

Penn Manor High School achieved 91.8 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement. In reading/literature - 82% were on grade level. In Algebra 1, 79% showed on grade level math skills at the end of the Algebra class. In Biology, only 37% showed on grade level science understanding at the end of the class.[39] According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2,181 public schools (less than 73 percent of Pennsylvania public schools), achieved an academic score of 70 or higher. Pennsylvania 11th grade students no longer take the PSSAs. Instead, beginning in 2012, they take the Keystone Exams at the end of the associated course.[40]

AYP status history

In 2012, Penn Manor High School remained in Corrective Action II 1st Year status due to low graduation rate for low-income students, as well as low achievement of all students in reading and mathematics.[41]

  • 2011 - declined again to Corrective Action II 1st Year status due to low student achievement by 4 sub groups, especially in math and reading.[42]
  • 2010 - declined further to Corrective Action I due to chronic low achievement of its 11th grade students.
  • 2009 - declined to School Improvement Level II due to lagging student achievement.[43] Under No Child Left Behind, the school must allow students to transfer to a higher performing high school within the district. Additionally the Administration was required to a develop and implement a plan to improve student academic achievement.
  • 2008 - declined to School Improvement Level I
  • 2007 - Warning AYP status
  • 2006 - achieved AYP status
  • 2005 - Making Progress School Improvement Level I
  • 2004 - declined to School Improvement Level I
  • 2003 - Warning AYP status
PSSA results

Pennsylvania System of School Assessments, commonly called PSSAs are No Child Left Behind Act related examinations which were administered from 2003 through 2012, in all Pennsylvania public high schools. The exams were administered in the Spring of each school year. The goal was for 100% of students to be on grade level or better in reading and mathematics, by the Spring of 2014. The tests focused on the state's Academic Standards for reading, writing, mathematics and science. The Science exam included content in science, technology, ecology and the environmental studies. The mathematics exam included: algebra I, algebra II, geometry and trigonometry. The standards were first published in 1998 and are mandated by the Pennsylvania State Board of Education.[44] In 2013, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania changed its high school assessments to the Keystone Exams in Algebra 1, Reading/literature and Biology1. The exams are given at the end of the course, rather than all in the spring of the student's 11th grade year.[45]

11th Grade Science:
  • 2011 - 47% on grade level (16% below basic). State - 42% of 11th graders were on grade level.
  • 2011 - 47% (13% below basic). State - 40% [53]
  • 2010 - 45% (10% below basic). State - 39%
  • 2009 - 49% (10% below basic). State - 40%
  • 2008 - 49%, State - 39%[54]

College remediation: According to a Pennsylvania Department of Education study released in January 2009, 23% of Penn Manor High School graduates required remediation in mathematics and or reading before they were prepared to take college level courses in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education or community colleges.[55] Less than 66% of Pennsylvania high school graduates, who enroll in a four-year college in Pennsylvania, will earn a bachelor's degree within six years. Among Pennsylvania high school graduates pursuing an associate degree, only one in three graduate in three years.[56] Per the Pennsylvania Department of Education, one in three recent high school graduates who attend Pennsylvania's public universities and community colleges takes at least one remedial course in math, reading or English.

Recognition[edit]

Penn Manor High School achieved the highest gains in reading and mathematics proficiency, for 2002–2007, of all the high schools in Lancaster County. Additionally, Penn Manor High School was recognized in 2006, by Standard and Poors‚ "School Matters", reporting system as one of only 48 schools in Pennsylvania, and the only one in Lancaster County, for demonstrating significant gains in PSSA scores by subgroup (economically disadvantaged). School-wide changes included the development of common curriculum and assessments, Friday reading in all classes, full year math and reading for struggling learners, and use of data to identify students and programs in need of support.[57]

Dual enrollment[edit]

Penn Manor High School offers a dual enrollment program. This state program permits high school students to take courses, at local higher education institutions, to earn college credits.[58] Students remain enrolled at their high school. The courses count towards high school graduation requirements and towards earning a college degree. The students continue to have full access to activities and programs at their high school. The college credits are offered at a deeply discounted rate. The state offers a small grant to assist students in costs for tuition, fees and books.[59] Under the Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Agreement, many Pennsylvania colleges and universities accept these credits for students who transfer to their institutions.[60] For the 2009-10 funding year, the school district received a state grant of $13,500 for the program.[61] Dual enrollment cash grants were discontinued in 2010 by then Governor Edward G. Rendell.

Graduation requirements[edit]

The Penn Manor School Board has determined that 28 credits are required for graduation, including English 4 credits, Social Studies 4 credits, Science 4 credits, Math 4 credits, Physical Education/Safety 1 credit, and Physical Education/Health 1 credit. There is also a Family Consumer Science requirement.[62]

By law, all Pennsylvania secondary school students must complete a project as a part of their eligibility to graduate from high school. The type of project, its rigor and its expectations are set by the individual school district.[63] At Penn Manor School District the project focuses on career development.[64] Students must complete 30 hours of community service as a part of the graduation project. Effective with the graduating class of 2017, the Pennsylvania Board of Education eliminated the state mandate that students complete a culminating project in order to graduate.[65]

By Pennsylvania School Board regulations, for the graduating class of 2017, students must demonstrate successful completion of secondary level course work in Algebra I, Biology, English Composition, and Literature. Students must pass Keystone Exam in each course to graduate. The exam will be administered at the end of the course. The Keystone Exams replace the 11th grade PSSAs.[66][67][68] In 2011, Pennsylvania high school students field tested the Algebra 1, Biology and English Lit exams. The statewide results were: Algebra 1 38% on grade level, Biology 35% on grade level and English Lit - 49% on grade level.[69] Individual student, school or district reports were not made public, although they were reported to district officials by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students identified as having special needs and qualifying for an Individual Educational Program (IEP) may graduate by meeting the requirements of their IEP.

SAT scores[edit]

In 2013, Penn Manor School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 504. The Math average score was 524. The Writing average score was 490. The College Board reported that statewide scores were: 494 in reading, 504 in math and 482 in writing. The nationwide SAT results were the same as in 2012.[70]

In 2012, 279 Penn Manor School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 497. The Math average score was 516. The Writing average score was 479. The statewide Verbal SAT exams results were: Verbal 491, Math 501, Writing 480. In the USA, 1.65 million students took the exams achieving scores: Verbal 496, Math 514, Writing 488. According to the College Board the maximum score on each section was 800, and 360 students nationwide scored a perfect 2,400.

In 2011, 288 Penn Manor High School students took the SAT exams. The district's Verbal Average Score was 512. The Math average score was 518. The Writing average score was 492.[71] Pennsylvania ranked 40th among states with SAT scores: Verbal - 493, Math - 501, Writing - 479.[72] In the United States, 1.65 million students took the exam in 2011. They averaged 497 (out of 800) verbal, 514 math and 489 in writing.[73]

Marticville Middle School[edit]

Marticville Middle School is located at 356 Frogtown Road, Pequea. The school is situated on a large, rural campus. In 2013, enrollment was pupils, in grades 7th and 8th, with 26% of pupils eligible for a free lunch due to family poverty. Additionally, 15% of pupils received special education services, while 9.9% of pupils were identified as gifted.[74] According to a 2013 report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[75]

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, Marticville Middle School reported an enrollment of 324 pupils, in grades 7th and 8th, with 78 pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price lunch due to family poverty. The school employed 26 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 12:1.[76] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2 teachers were rated "Non‐Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[77]

2013 School Performance Profile

Marticville Middle School achieved 86.1 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, writing, mathematics and science achievement. In reading, just 78% of the students were on grade level. In Mathematics/Algebra 1, 85% of the students showed on grade level skills. In Science, only 70% of the 8th graders demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, 84% of the 8th grade students demonstrated on grade level writing skills.[78]

AYP history

In 2011 and 2012, Marticville Middle School achieved Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) status.[79] From 2008 through 2010, Marticville Middle School was in Warning level status for AYP, due to lagging student achievement. In 2011 and 2010, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[80] From 2003 through 2007, Marticville Middle School achieved AYP status each school year.

PSSA Results:

Pennsylvania System of School Assessments, commonly called PSSAs are NCLB related examination given in the Spring of each school year. Sixth and seventh grades have been tested in reading and mathematics since 2006. Eighth graders are tested in: reading, writing, mathematics and Science. Beginning in the Spring of 2013, eighth graders, who are enrolled in Algebra I take the Keystone Exam for Algebra I at the end of the course. The testing of 8th grade in reading and mathematics began in 1999, as a state initiative.[81] Testing in science began in 2007. The goal is for 100% of students to be on grade level or better in reading and mathematics, by the Spring of 2014. The tests focus on the state's Academic Standards for reading, writing, mathematics and science.[82] The standards were published in 1998 and are mandated by the Pennsylvania State Board of Education.[44] In 2014, the Commonwealth adopted the Pennsylvania Core Standards - Mathematics.[83]

8th Grade Science:
  • 2012 - 68% on grade level (9% below basic). State - 59%[89]
  • 2011 - 71% (12% below basic). State – 58.3%
  • 2010 - 65% (18% below basic). State - 57%.
  • 2009 - 64% (15% below basic), State - 54%[90]
  • 2008 - 70% (10% below basic), State - 52%[91]

Attendance at Marticville Middle School in Pequea, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 96.25%, essentially the same as the 95.4% scored in the prior year. Students were 74.9% proficient in math, 83.2% proficient in reading.[92]

Manor Middle School[edit]

Manor MIddle School is on a large, rural campus located just outside Millersville, Pennsylvania. The building also houses the district's administrative offices. In 2013, enrollment was 539 pupils, in grades 7th and 8th, with 37% of pupils eligible for a free lunch due to family poverty. Additionally, 17% of pupils received special education services, while 8.9% of pupils were identified as gifted.[93] According to a 2013 report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 95% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[94]

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, the school reported an enrollment of 529 pupils, in grades 7th and 8th, with 153 pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price lunch due to family poverty. The school employed 34.5 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 15:1.[95] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 9 teachers were rated "Non‐Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[96]

2013 School Performance Profile

Manor Middle School achieved 87 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, writing, mathematics and science achievement. In reading, just 79% of the students were on grade level. In Mathematics/Algebra 1, 79.9% of the students showed on grade level skills. In Science, only 67% of the 8th graders demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, 79% of the 8th grade students demonstrated on grade level writing skills.[97]

AYP status

In 2010 through 2012, Manor Middle School achieved AYP status each school year.[98] In 2010 and 2011, Manor Middle School reported an attendance rate at 95%.[99][100] In 2009, the attendance rate was 96% and the school achieved AYP status.[101]

8th Grade Science
  • 2012 - 74% on grade level (12% below basic). State - 59%[89]
  • 2011 - 68% (12% below basic). State – 58.3%
  • 2010 - 59% (19% below basic). State - 57%.
  • 2009 - 65% (15% below basic). State - 54%[90]
  • 2008 - 57% (17% below basic). State - 52%[91]

Attendance at Manor Middle School in Lancaster, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 96.51%, essentially the same as the 95.96% scored in the prior year. Students were 73.9% proficient in math, 75.5% proficient in reading.[107]

Elementary schools[edit]

Penn Manor School District operates seven elementary schools.

Each year, in the Spring, the 3rd graders and 6th graders take the PSSAs in math and reading. The fourth grade is tested in reading, math and science. The fifth grade is evaluated in reading, mathematics and writing. Pennsylvania System of School Assessments, commonly called PSSAs are No Child Left Behind Act related examinations which were administered beginning 2003 to all Pennsylvania public school students in grades 3rd-8th.[108] The goal was for 100% of students to be on grade level or better in reading and mathematics, by the Spring of 2014.[109][110][111] The tests focused on the state's Academic Standards for reading, writing, mathematics and science. The Science exam is given to 4th grades and includes content in science, technology, ecology and the environmental studies.[112]

Central Manor Elementary School[edit]

Central Manor Elementary is a rural, midsized elementary school located at 3717 Blue Rock Road, Washington Boro, Pennsylvania. In 2013, the school's enrollment was 605 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 36% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 11% of the pupils receive special education services, while 4.3% are identified as gifted.[113] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated highly qualified under No Child Left Behind. The school provides half day kindergarten.[114] The school is a federally designated Title I school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, enrollment was 615 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 203 pupils receiving a free or reduced price lunch. The School employed 37 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 16:1.[115] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[116] The school provides half day kindergarten to all its pupils.[117]

2013 School Performance Profile

Central Manor Elementary School achieved a score of 81 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2012-13, only 73% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 3rd through 6th. In 3rd grade, 85% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In math, 80% were on grade level (3rd-6th grades). In 4th grade science, 90% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, only 61% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level skills.[118]

AYP history

In 2003 through 2012, Central Manor Elementary School achieved AYP status each school year. In 2011, the attendance rate was 96%.[119] In 2010, the school achieved AYP status. The attendance rate was reported as 97%.[120] In 2009, the school's attendance rate was 97%.[121]

Attendance at Central Manor Elementary School in Washington Boro, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 96.49%, essentially the same as the 96.75% scored in the prior year. Students were 76.6% proficient in math, 72.2% proficient in reading.[122]

4th Grade Science
  • 2012 - 90% (3% below basic). State - 82%
  • 2011 - 90% (1% below basic). State – 82.9%
  • 2010 - 85% (2% below basic). State - 81%
  • 2009 - 88% (4% below basic). State - 83%

Conestoga Elementary School[edit]

Conestoga Elementary School is a small, rural elementary school located at 100 Hill Street, Conestoga, Pennsylvania. In 2013, the School's enrollment was 282 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 36% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 16% of the pupils receive special education services, while 9.9% are identified as gifted.[127] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated highly qualified under No Child Left Behind. The School provides half day kindergarten.[128] Conestoga Elementary School is a federally designated Title I school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, enrollment was 283 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 76 pupils receiving a free or reduced price lunch. The School employed 19 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 14:1.[129] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[130] The school provides half day kindergarten to all its pupils.[117]

2013 School Performance Profile

Conestoga Elementary School achieved a score of 89.1 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2012-13, only 74% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 3rd through 6th. In 3rd grade, 66.6% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In math, 86% were on grade level (3rd-6th grades). In 4th grade science, 94% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, only 75% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level writing skills.[131]

AYP history

In 2010 through 2012, Conestoga Elementary School achieved AYP status each school year.[132] In 2010 and 2011, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[133][134] In 2009, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[135] Attendance at Conestoga Elementary School in Conestoga, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 96.61%, essentially the same as the 96.37% scored in the prior year. Students were 91.7% proficient in math, 81.0% proficient in reading.[136]

4th Grade Science
  • 2012 - 96%, 72% advanced. State - 82%
  • 2011 - 95%, 76% advanced. State – 82.9%
  • 2010 - 96%, 72% advanced. State - 81%
  • 2009 - 98%, 57% advanced. State - 83%

Eshleman Elementary School[edit]

Eshleman Elementary School is a small, suburban elementary school located at 545 Leaman Ave, Millersville, Pennsylvania. In 2013, Eshleman Elementary School's enrollment was 331 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 28.7% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 10.8% of the pupils receive special education services, while 5.4% are identified as gifted.[141] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated highly qualified under No Child Left Behind. The school provides half day kindergarten.[142] The school is not a federally designated Title I school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, enrollment was 333 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 92 pupils receiving a free or reduced price lunch. The School employed 18 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 18:1.[143] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Non‐Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[144]

2013 School Performance Profile

Eshleman Elementary School achieved a score of 84.2 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2012-13, only 77% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 3rd through 6th. In 3rd grade, 80% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In math, 83% were on grade level (3rd-6th grades). In 4th grade science, just 86% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, only 72% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level skills.[145]

AYP history

In 2012, Eshleman Elementary School declined to Warning AYP status due to lagging reading achievement.[146] In 2011, 2010 and 2009, the School achieved AYP status.[147] In 2010 and 2011, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[148][149] In 2009, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[150] Attendance at Eshleman Elementary School in Millersville, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 97.1%, essentially the same as the 96.59% scored in the prior year. Students were 85.4% proficient in math, 80.9% proficient in reading.[151][152]

4th Grade Science
  • 2012 - 92%, (0% below basic). State - 82%
  • 2011 - 86%, (2% below basic), State – 82.9%
  • 2010 - 91%, (2% below basic), State - 81%
  • 2009 - 90%, (2% below basic), State - 83%

Hambright Elementary School[edit]

Hambright Elementary is a suburban school located at 2121 Temple Avenue, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. In 2013, the School's enrollment was 437 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 46% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 14% of the pupils receive special education services, while 1.8% are identified as gifted.[157] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated highly qualified under No Child Left Behind. The School provides half day kindergarten.[158] The school is a federally designated Title I school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, enrollment was 461 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with pupils receiving a free or reduced price lunch. The School employed 28 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 16:1.[159] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[160] The School provides half day kindergarten to all its pupils.[117]

2013 School Performance Profile

Hambright Elementary School achieved a score of 78 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2012-13, only 61% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 3rd through 6th. In 3rd grade, 68% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In math, 72% were on grade level (3rd-6th grades). In 4th grade science, 82% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, only 74% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level skills.[161]

AYP history

In 2009 through 2012, Hambright Elementary School achieved AYP status each school year.[162] In 2011 and 2010, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[163][164] In 2009, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[165]

Attendance at Hambright Elementary School in Lancaster, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 96.25%, essentially the same as the 96.35% scored in the prior year. Students were 85.7% proficient in math, 61.9% proficient in reading.[166]

4th Grade Science
  • 2011 - 76%, (10% below basic), State – 82.9%
  • 2010 - 76%, (9% below basic), State - 81%
  • 2009 - 75%, (4% below basic), State - 83%

Anne Letort Elementary School[edit]

Anne Letort Elementary School is a small, rural elementary school located in 561 Letort Road, Washington Boro, Pennsylvania. In 2013, the School's enrollment was 290 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 21% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 14% of the pupils receive special education services, while 6.9% are identified as gifted.[167] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated highly qualified under No Child Left Behind. The school provides half day kindergarten.[168] The school is not a federally designated Title I school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, enrollment was 280 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with pupils receiving a free or reduced price lunch. The School employed 19 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 14:1.[169] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[170] The school provides half day kindergarten to all its pupils.[117][171]

2013 School Performance Profile

Anne Letort Elementary School achieved a score of 86.3 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2012-13, 81% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 3rd through 6th. In 3rd grade, 88% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In math, 86% were on grade level (3rd-6th grades). In 4th grade science, 87.5% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, only 76% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level skills.[172]

AYP history

In 2011, 2010 and 2009, Anne Letort Elementary School achieved AYP status. In 2010, the attendance rate was reported as 97%.[173][174] In 2009, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[175]

Attendance at Letort Elementary School in Washington Boro, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 97.35%, essentially the same as the 97.39% scored in the prior year. Students were 83.1% proficient in math, 75.3% proficient in reading. Former student Taylor Coulton helped create their school song."We long our school"[176]

Martic Elementary School[edit]

Martic is a small, rural elementary school located in Martic, Pennsylvania. In 2013, the School's enrollment was 311 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 36% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 16% of the pupils receive special education services, while 6% are identified as gifted.[177] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated highly qualified under No Child Left Behind. The school provides half day kindergarten.[178] The school is a federally designated Title I school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, enrollment was 308 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 84 pupils receiving a free or reduced price lunch. The School employed 22 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 13:1.[179] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[180] The school provides half day kindergarten to all its pupils.[117]

2013 School Performance Profile

Martic Elementary School achieved a score of 88.2 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2012-13, only 75% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 3rd through 6th. In 3rd grade, 92% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In math, 77.8% were on grade level (3rd-6th grades). In 4th grade science, 95% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, 81% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level skills.[181]

AYP history

In 2012, Martic Elementary School again achieved AYP status. Martic Elementary School declined to Warning status in 2011.[182] In both 2010 and 2009, Martic Elementary School achieved AYP status. In 2010 and 2011, the attendance rate was reported as 97%.[183][184] In 2009, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[185]

Attendance at Martic Elementary School in Holtwood, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 96.25%, essentially the same as the 96.39% scored in the prior year. Students were 88.0% proficient in math, 70.9% proficient in reading.[186]

Pequea Elementary School[edit]

Pequea Elementary is a small, rural elementary school located at 802 Millwood Road, Willow Street, Pennsylvania. In 2013, the School's enrollment was 349 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 27% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 20% of the pupils receive special education services, while 4.9% are identified as gifted.[187] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated highly qualified under No Child Left Behind. The school provides half day kindergarten.[188] The school is a federally designated Title I school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2011, enrollment was 359 pupils in grades kindergarten through 6th, with 100 pupils receiving a free or reduced price lunch. The School employed 22 teachers yielding a student-teacher ratio of 16:1.[189] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[190] The School provides half day kindergarten to all its pupils.[117]

2013 School Performance Profile

Pequea Elementary School achieved a score of 86.9 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2012-13, only 72% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 3rd through 6th. In 3rd grade, 79% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In math, 81.8% were on grade level (3rd-6th grades). In 4th grade science, 88% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, 85.7% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level skills.[191]

AYP history

IFrom 2010 through 2012, Pequea Elementary School achieved AYP status each school year.[192] In 2010, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[193] In 2009, the attendance rate was reported as 96%.[194]

Attendance at Pequea Elementary School in Willow Street, Pennsylvania during the 2005-2006 school year was 96.57%, essentially the same as the 97.34% scored in the prior year. Students were 78.0% proficient in math, 72.4% proficient in reading.[195]

Comparison to other Lancaster County school districts[edit]

Pennsylvania System of School Assessment
2011-2012 PSSA proficiency levels for Lancaster County schools
School district 3-5 Reading 3-5 Math 6-8 Reading 6-8 Math 11 Reading 11 Math
Cocalico 82.7% 86.1% 85.8% 89.5% 68.1% 61.4%
Columbia Borough 60.9% 72.4% 53.2% 67.3% 46.8% 45.3%
Conestoga Valley 76.3% 84.9% 83.9% 90.0% 82.7% 75.0%
Donegal 73.1% 82.5% 71.5% 82.9% 62.3% 51.8%
Eastern Lancaster County 72.5% 81.7% 79.9% 84.0% 74.4% 68.1%
Elizabethtown Area 70.8% 80.3% 76.6% 85.4% 72.2% 67.3%
Ephrata Area 77.4% 87.7% 79.1% 85.4% 72.3% 75.7%
Hempfield 85.5% 89.8% 86.5% 88.8% 76.6% 73.8%
Lampeter-Strasburg 89.0% 91.0% 86.9% 90.7% 86.1% 81.0%
Lancaster 50.5% 63.5% 46.4% 55.4% 43.9% 32.6%
Manheim Central 76.6% 83.7% 84.3% 90.1% 64.6% 64.5%
Manheim Township 80.1% 90.2% 85.9% 88.0% 77.7% 72.1%
Penn Manor 75.5% 86.4% 80.7% 85.6% 76.3% 69.7%
Pequea Valley 77.7% 86.4% 68.9% 74.4% 72.2% 52.0%
Solanco 82.9% 88.5% 85.6% 87.9% 69.6% 56.5%
Warwick 79.5% 83.7% 86.6% 87.1% 77.8% 72.8%
Source: http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/school_assessments/7442

Special education[edit]

In December 2012, Penn Manor School District administration reported that 844 pupils or 16% of the District's pupils received Special Education services, with 56% of the identified students having a specific learning disability.[196] In December 2009, the Penn Manor School District administration reported that 855 pupils or 16.4% of the district's pupils received Special Education services.[197]

The District engages in identification procedures to ensure that eligible students receive an appropriate educational program consisting of special education and related services, individualized to meet student needs. At no cost to the parents, these services are provided in compliance with state and federal law; and are reasonably calculated to yield meaningful educational benefit and student progress. To identify students who may be eligible for special education, various screening activities are conducted on an ongoing basis. These screening activities include: review of group-based data (cumulative records, enrollment records, health records, report cards, ability and achievement test scores); hearing, vision, motor, and speech/language screening; and review by the Instructional Support Team or Student Assistance Team. When screening results suggest that the student may be eligible, the District seeks parental consent to conduct a multidisciplinary evaluation. Parents who suspect their child is eligible may request a multidisciplinary evaluation in writing to the Special Education Department.[198]

In 2010, the state of Pennsylvania provided $1,026,815,000 for special education services. The funds were distributed to districts based on a state policy which estimated that 16% of the district's pupils are receiving special education services. This funding is in addition to the state's basic education per pupil funding, as well as, all other state and federal funding.[199] The Special Education funding structure is through the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) funds and state appropriations. IDEA funds are appropriated to the state on an annual basis and distributed through intermediate units (IUs) to school districts, while state funds are distributed directly to the districts. Total funds that are received by school districts are calculated through a formula. The Pennsylvania Department of Education oversees four appropriations used to fund students with special needs: Special Education; Approved Private Schools; Pennsylvania Chartered Schools for the Deaf and Blind; and Early Intervention. The Pennsylvania Special Education funding system assumes that 16% of the district’s students receive special education services. It also assumes that each student’s needs accrue the same level of costs.[200] Over identification of students, in order to increase state funding, has been an issue in the Commonwealth. Some districts have more than 20% of its students receiving special education services while others have 10% supported through special education.[201] The state requires each public school district and charter school to have a three-year special education plan to meet the unique needs of its special education students.[202] In 2012, the Obama Administration's US Department of Education issued a directive requiring schools include students with disabilities in extracurricular activities, including sports.[203]

Penn Manor School District received a $2,567,567 supplement for special education services in 2010.[204] For the 2011-12, 2012–13 and 2013-14 school years, all Pennsylvania public school districts received the same level of funding for special education that they received in 2010-11. This level funding is provided regardless of changes in the number of pupils who need special education services and regardless of the level of services the respective students required.[205][206] For the 2014-2015 school year, PMSD will receive an increase to $2,619,893 from the Commonwealth for special education funding.[207] Additionally, the state provides supplemental funding for extraordinarily impacted students. The District must apply for this added funding.

Gifted education[edit]

The District Administration reported that 318 or 6.15% of its students were gifted in 2009.[208] By law, the district must provide mentally gifted programs at all grade levels. The referral process for a gifted evaluation can be initiated by teachers or parents by contacting the student’s building principal and requesting an evaluation. All requests must be made in writing. The principal acts as the case manager for the referral process. A 60 calendar day time-line begins when the signed Permission to Evaluate form is received. To be eligible for mentally gifted programs in Pennsylvania, a student must have a cognitive ability of at least 130 as measured on a standardized ability test by a certified school psychologist. Other factors that indicate giftedness will also be considered for eligibility.[209] Through the strategic planning process, the Superintendent must ensure that Penn Manor School District provides a continuum of program and service options to meet the needs of all mentally gifted students for enrichment, acceleration, or both. The district's program is based on student needs and provides differentiated curriculum using acceleration, enrichment and pull-out options.[210]

Bullying Policy[edit]

The Penn Manor School District Administration reported seven incidents of bullying occurring in the schools in 2009.[211][212]

The school board prohibits bullying by district students and employees.[213] The Board directs that complaints of bullying and harassment shall be investigated promptly, and corrective action shall be taken when allegations are verified. No reprisals or retaliation shall occur as a result of good faith reports of bullying.[214] All Pennsylvania schools are required to have an anti-bullying policy incorporated into their Code of Student Conduct. The policy must identify disciplinary actions for bullying and designate a school staff person to receive complaints of bullying. The policy must be available on the school's website and posted in every classroom. All Pennsylvania public schools must provide a copy of its anti-bullying policy to the Office for Safe Schools every year, and shall review their policy every three years. Additionally, the district must conduct an annual review of that policy with students.[215] District administration are required to annually provide the following information with the district's Safe School Report: the board’s bullying policy, a report of bullying incidents in the school district, and information on the development and implementation of any bullying prevention, intervention or education programs. The Center for Schools and Communities works, in partnership with the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime & Delinquency and the Pennsylvania Department of Education, to assist schools and communities as they research, select and implement bullying prevention programs and initiatives.[216] Education standards relating to student safety and antiharassment programs are described in the 10.3. Safety and Injury Prevention in the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Health, Safety and Physical Education.[217]

Budget[edit]

Pennsylvania public school districts budget and expend funds according to procedures mandated by the General Assembly and the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). An annual operating budget is prepared by school district administrative officials. A uniform form is furnished by the PDE and submitted to the board of school directors for approval prior to the beginning of each fiscal year on July 1.

Under Pennsylvania’s Taxpayer Relief Act, Act 1 of the Special Session of 2006, all school districts of the first class A, second class, third class and fourth class must adopt a preliminary budget proposal. The proposal must include estimated revenues and expenditures and the proposed tax rates. This proposed budget must be considered by the Board no later than 90 days prior to the date of the election immediately preceding the fiscal year. The preliminary budget proposal must also be printed and made available for public inspection at least 20 days prior to its adoption. The board of school directors may hold a public hearing on the budget, but are not required to do so. The board must give at least 10 days’ public notice of its intent to adopt the final budget according to Act 1 of 2006.[218]

In 2013, the average teacher salary in Penn Manor School District was $63,020 a year, while the cost of the benefits teachers received was $20,698 per employee, for a total annual average teacher compensation of $83,719.[219] The District employed 522 teachers and administrators in 2012, with an average salary of $64,698 and a top salary of $153,450. The District had 22 employees who were paid over $90,000 a year.[220][221]

In 2011, the teachers of the Penn Manor School District voted to freeze their salaries for one year to assist the school board in dealing with a significant budget shortfall.[222] As a part of the contract teachers were to receive an annual 3.7% annual raise for three years.[223]

In 2009, the district reported employing over 380 teachers with a starting salary of $40,000 for 182 days for pupil instruction.[224] The average teacher salary was $58,689 while the maximum salary was $120,542.[225]

As of 2007, Pennsylvania ranked in the top 10 states in average teacher salaries. When adjusted for cost of living Pennsylvania ranked fourth in the nation for teacher compensation.[226] Additionally, Penn Manor School District teachers receive a defined benefit pension, health insurance, full costs for professional development courses, 3 paid personal days, 10 sick days, 3 paid bereavement days, and other benefits. Teachers are paid an additional hourly rate, if they are required to work outside of the regular school day. The school day is 7 hours 5 minutes for secondary teachers and 6 hours and 45 minutes for elementary teachers. Retirees receive $125 per year worked at PSMSD plus $60 for each unused accumulated sick days. Teachers who serves as mentors and team leaders receive $1000 in compensation.[227] According to State Rep. Glen Grell, a trustee of the Pennsylvania Public School Employees’ Retirement System Board, a 40-year educator can retire with a pension equal to 100 percent of their final salary.[228]

In 2007, the district employed 332 teachers. The average teacher salary in the district was $54,529 for 183 school days worked.[229]

Per pupil spending Penn Manor School District administrative costs per pupil in 2008 was $653.61 per pupil. This ranked 378th among Pennsylvania's 500 school districts. The lowest administrative cost per pupil in Pennsylvania was $398 per pupil.[230]

In 2008, Penn Manor School District reported spending $11,343 per pupil. This ranked 359th in the commonwealth.[231]

Reserves

In 2009, the district reported $5,412,699 in an unreserved-undesignated fund balance. The designated fund balance was reported as $6,512,117.[232] By 2013, the Board had accumulated over $15.5 million in reserves. Pennsylvania public school district reserve funds are divided into two categories – designated and undesignated. The undesignated funds are not committed to any planned project. Designated funds and any other funds, such as capital reserves, are allocated to specific projects. School districts are required by state law to keep 5 percent of their annual spending in the undesignated reserve funds to preserve bond ratings. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, from 2003 to 2010, as a whole, Pennsylvania school districts amassed nearly $3 billion in reserved funds.[233] In 2005, the total reserve funds held by Pennsylvania public school districts was $1.9 billion.[234] By 2013, reserves held by Pennsylvania public school districts, as a whole, had increased to over $3.8 billion.[235][236]

Tuition Students who live in the Penn Manor School District's attendance area may choose to attend one of Pennsylvania's 157 public charter schools. A student living in a neighboring public school district or a foreign exchange student may seek admission to Area School District. For these cases, the Pennsylvania Department of Education sets an annual tuition rate for each school district. It is the amount the public school district pays to a charter school for each resident student that attends the charter and it is the amount a nonresident student's parents must pay to attend the District's schools. The 2013 tuition rates are Elementary School - $8,626.85, High School - $8,860.14[237]

Audit In June 2010, the Pennsylvania Auditor General conducted a performance audit of the district. Findings were reported to the administration and school board.[238] In May 2014, the District was audited again with the findings reported to the Board.[239]

Penn Manor School District is funded by a combination of: a local earned income tax, a property tax, a real estate transfer tax 0.5%, coupled with substantial funding from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the federal government. Grants can provide an opportunity to supplement school funding without raising local taxes.[240] Grants can provide an opportunity to supplement school funding without raising local taxes. Interest earnings on accounts also provide nontax income to the District. In the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, pension income and Social Security income are exempted from state personal income tax and local earned income tax, regardless of the level of the individual’s personal wealth.[241] The average Pennsylvania public school teacher pension in 2011 exceeds $60,000 a year plus they receive federal Social Security benefits: both are free of Pennsylvania state income tax and local income tax which funds local public schools.[242]

State basic education funding[edit]

According to a report from Representative Todd Stephens office, Penn Manor School District receives 30% of its annual revenue from the state.[243]

For the 2014-15 school year, Penn Manor School District will receive $10,761,968 in State Basic Education funding. The District will also receive $482,569 in new Ready To Learn Block grant. The State’s enacted Education Budget includes $5,526,129,000 for the 2014-2015 Basic Education Funding.[244] The Education budget also includes Accountability Block Grant funding at $100 million and $241 million in new Ready to Learn funding for public schools that focus on student achievement and academic success. The State is paying $500.8 million to Social Security on the school employees behalf and another $1.16 billion to the state teachers pension system (PSERS). In total, Pennsylvania’s Education budget for K-12 public schools is $10 billion. This was a $305 million increase over 2013-2014 state spending and the greatest amount ever allotted by the Commonwealth for its public schools.[245]

In the 2013-2014 school year, Penn Manor School District received a 2.5% increase or $10,761,968 in Pennsylvania Basic Education Funding. This is $261,655 more than its 2012-13 state BEF to the District. Additionally, Penn Manor School District received $228,117 in Accountability Block Grant funding to focus on academic achievement and level funding for special education services. Among the public school districts in Lancaster County, Lancaster School District received the highest percentage increase in BEF at 6.4%. The District has the option of applying for several other state and federal grants to increase revenues. The Commonwealth’s budget increased Basic Education Funding statewide by $123 million to over $5.5 billion. Most of Pennsylvania’s 500 public school districts received an increase of Basic Education Funding in a range of 0.9% to 4%. Eight public school districts received exceptionally high funding increases of 10% to 16%. The highest increase in state funding was awarded to Austin Area School District which received a 22.5% increase in Basic Education Funding.[246] The highest percent of state spending per student is in the Chester-Upland district, where roughly 78 percent comes from state coffers. In Philadelphia, it is nearly 49 percent.[247] As a part of the education budget, the state provided the PSERS (Pennsylvania school employee pension fund) with $1,017,000,000 and Social Security payments for school employees of $495 million.[248]

For the 2012-13 school year, Penn Manor School District received $10,500,410.[249] The Governor's Executive Budget for 2012-2013 included $9.34 billion for kindergarten through 12th grade public education, including $5.4 billion in basic education funding, which was an increase of $49 million over the 2011-12 budget. In addition, the Commonwealth provided $100 million for the Accountability Block Grant (ABG) program. The state also provided a $544.4 million payment for School Employees’ Social Security and $856 million for School Employees’ Retirement fund called PSERS.[250] This amount was a $21,823,000 increase (0.34%) over the 2011-2012 appropriations for Basic Education Funding, School Employees' Social Security, Pupil Transportation, Nonpublic and Charter School Pupil Transportation. Since taking office, Corbett’s first two budgets have restored more than $918 million in support of public schools, compensating for the $1 billion in federal stimulus dollars lost at the end of the 2010-11 school year.

In 2011–12 school year, Penn Manor School District received $10,497,844 in state Basic Education Funding.[251] Additionally, the district received $228,117 in Accountability Block Grant funding. The enacted Pennsylvania state Education Budget includes $5,354,629,000 for the 2011–2012 Basic Education Funding appropriation. This amount is a $233,290,000 increase (4.6%) over the enacted State appropriation, for 2010–2011.[252]

For the 2010-11 school year, Penn Manor School District received a 6.18% increase in state Basic Education Funding resulting in a $11,562,559 payment.[253] In 2010, Conestoga Valley School District received an 18,51% increase, which was the highest increase in BEF among Lancaster County public school districts. Kennett Consolidated School District in Chester County received the highest increase in the state at 23.65% increase in funding for the 2010-11 school year. One hundred fifty school districts received the base 2% increase in 2010-11. The amount of increase each school district receives is determined by the Governor and the Secretary of Education through the allocation set in the state budget proposal made in February each year.[254] In 2010, the District reported that 1,463 students received free or reduced price lunches, due to the family meeting the federal poverty level.[255] Some public school Districts experienced a reduction in funding due to the loss of federal stimulus funding which ended in 2011.

In the 2009-2010 budget year, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania provided Penn Manor School District a 4.47% increase in Basic Education funding for a total of $10,889,788. The district also received supplemental funding for English language learners, Title 1 federal funding for low-income students, for district size, a poverty supplement from the commonwealth and more.[256] Columbia Borough School District received the highest increase in Lancaster County for the 2009-10 school year at 8.61%. Among the 500 school districts in Pennsylvania, Muhlenberg School District in Berks County received the highest with a 22.31% increase in funding.[257]

The state Basic Education funding to the district in 2008-09 was $10,423,891.41. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 952 district students received free or reduced-price lunches due to low family income in the 2007-2008 school year.[258]

Accountability Block Grants[edit]

Beginning in 2004-2005, the state launched the Accountability Block Grant school funding. This program has provided $1.5 billion to Pennsylvania’s school districts. The Accountability Block Grant program requires that its taxpayer dollars are focused on specific interventions that are most likely to increase student academic achievement. These interventions include: teacher training, all-day kindergarten, lower class size K-3rd grade, literacy and math coaching programs that provide teachers with individualized job-embedded professional development to improve their instruction, before or after school tutoring assistance to struggling students. For 2010-11 the Penn Manor School District applied for and received $619,165 in addition to all other state and federal funding. The district used the funding to provide full-day kindergarten for the 3rd year and to reduce class size Kindergarten to 3rd grade.[259][260]

Ready to Learn grant[edit]

Beginning in the 2014-2015 budget, the State funded a new Ready to Learn Grant for public schools. A total of $100 million is allocated through a formula to districts based on the number of students, level of poverty of community as calculated by its market value/personal income aid ratio (MV/PI AR) and the number of English language learners. Ready to Learn Block Grant funds may be used by the Districts for: school safety; Ready by 3 early childhood intervention programs; individualized learning programs; and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs.[261]

Penn Manor School District will receive $482,569 in Ready to Learn Grant dollars in addition to State Basic Education funding, Special Education funding, Accountability Block Grant funding, PreK Counts funding, reimbursement for Social Security payments for employees and other state grants which the district must apply to receive.

Classrooms for the Future grant[edit]

The Classroom for the Future state program provided districts with hundreds of thousands of extra state funding to buy laptop computers for each core curriculum high school class (English, Science, History, Math) and paid for teacher training to optimize the computers use. The program was funded from 2006-2009. Penn Manor School District received did not apply for funding in 2006-07. In 2007-2008, the District received $585,907. For the 2008-2009, school year the District received $106,906 for a total of $692,813. Of the 501 public school districts in Pennsylvania, 447 of them received Classrooms for the Future grant awards.[262]

Other grants[edit]

The District did not participate in: Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Environmental Education annual grants;[263][264] PA Science Its Elementary grants (discontinued effective with 2009-10 budget by Governor Rendell);[265] Education Assistance Grants; 2012 Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy grant;[266] 2013 Safe Schools and Resource Officer grants; 2012 and 2013 Pennsylvania Hybrid Learning Grants[267] nor the federal 21st Century Learning grants.

Federal Stimulus grant[edit]

Penn Manor School District received an extra $2,779,730 in ARRA - Federal Stimulus money to be used in specific programs like Title 1, special education and meeting the academic needs of low-income students.[268] The funding was for the 2009-10 and 2010-11 school years.[269]

Race to the Top grant[edit]

Penn Manor School District officials did not apply for the Race to the Top federal grant which would have brought the district over one million additional federal dollars for improving student academic achievement.[270][271] Participation required the administration, the school board and the local teachers' union to sign an agreement to prioritize improving student academic success.[272] In Pennsylvania, 120 public school districts and 56 charter schools agreed to participate.[273] Pennsylvania was not approved for the grant. The failure of districts to agree to participate was cited as one reason that Pennsylvania was not approved.[274]

Common Cents state initiative[edit]

The Penn Manor School Board chose to not participate in the Pennsylvania Department of Education Common Cents program. The program called for the state to audit the district, at no cost to local taxpayers, to identify ways the district could save tax dollars.[275] After the review of the information, the district was not required to implement any of the recommended cost savings changes.

Real estate taxes[edit]

The Penn Manor School Board set property tax rates in 2015-16 at 18.0100 mills.[276] A mill is $1 of tax for every $1,000 of a property's assessed value. Irregular property reassessments have become a serious issue in the commonwealth as it creates a significant disparity in taxation within a community and across a region.[277] Property taxes, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, apply only to real estate - land and buildings. The property tax is not levied on cars, business inventory, or other personal property. Certain types of property are exempt from property taxes, including: places of worship, places of burial, private social clubs, charitable and educational institutions and all government property (local, state and federal). Additionally, service related, disabled US military veterans may seek an exemption from paying property taxes. Unlike other states, under Pennsylvania state tax policy, natural gas and oil pipelines are exempted from property taxes.[278] There is a major gas transmission pipeline proposal (Atlantic Sunrise pipeline by Williams Partners)[279] which will be passing through the District.[280] Pipeline companies prohibit development within the 100 foot wide right-of-way, there by limiting future development options for the landowner. This limits future potential property tax revenues for the school district, by constraining future land development. Penn Manor School District is adversely impacted this way.[281][282]

Pennsylvania school district revenues are dominated by two main sources: 1) Property tax collections, which account for the vast majority (between 75-85%) of local revenues; and 2) Act 511 tax collections, which are around 15% of revenues for school districts.[283] When a Pennsylvania public school district includes municipalities in two counties, each of which has different rates of property tax assessment, a state board equalizes the tax rates between the counties.[284] In 2010, miscalculations by the State Tax Equalization Board (STEB) were widespread in the Commonwealth and adversely impacted funding for many school districts, including those that did not cross county borders.[285]

The average yearly property tax paid by Lancaster County residents amounts to about 4.01% of their yearly income. Lancaster County ranked 231st out of the 3143 United States counties for property taxes as a percentage of median income.[295] According to a report prepared by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, the total real estate taxes collected by all school districts in Pennsylvania rose from $6,474,133,936 in 1999-00 to $10,438,463,356 in 2008-09 and to $11,153,412,490 in 2011.[296] Property taxes in Pennsylvania are relatively high on a national scale. According to the Tax Foundation, Pennsylvania ranked 11th in the U.S. in 2008 in terms of property taxes paid as a percentage of home value (1.34%) and 12th in the country in terms of property taxes as a percentage of income (3.55%).[297]

Act 1 Adjusted index[edit]

The Act 1 of 2006 Index regulates the rates at which each school district can raise property taxes in Pennsylvania. Districts are not authorized to raise taxes above that index unless they allow voters to vote by referendum, or they seek an exception from the state Department of Education. The base index for the 2011-2012 school year is 1.4 percent, but the Act 1 Index can be adjusted higher, depending on a number of factors, such as property values and the personal income of district residents. Act 1 included 10 exceptions, including: increasing pension costs, increases in special education costs, a catastrophe like a fire or flood, increase in health insurance costs for contracts in effect in 2006 or dwindling tax bases. The base index is the average of the percentage increase in the statewide average weekly wage, as determined by the PA Department of Labor and Industry, for the preceding calendar year and the percentage increase in the Employment Cost Index for Elementary and Secondary Schools, as determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the U.S. Department of Labor, for the previous 12-month period ending June 30. For a school district with a market value/personal income aid ratio (MV/PI AR) greater than 0.4000, its index equals the base index multiplied by the sum of .75 and its MV/PI AR for the current year.[298]

The School District Adjusted Index for the Penn Manor School District 2006-2007 through 2010-2011.[299]

For the 2014-15 budget year, Penn Manor School Board did not apply for exceptions to exceed their Act 1 Index limit. In 2014-15, all Pennsylvania school districts were required to make a 21.4% of payroll payment to the teacher’s pension fund (PSERS).[303] For the school budget 2014-15, 316 Pennsylvania public school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above its Act 1 Index limit. Another 181 school districts adopted a preliminary budget leaving open the option of exceeding the Index limit. Districts may apply for multiple exceptions each year. For the pension costs exception, 163 school districts received approval to exceed the Index in full, while others received a partial approval of their request. For special education costs, 104 districts received approval to exceed their tax limit. Seven Pennsylvania public school districts received an approval for the grandfathered construction debts exception.[304]

For the 2013-14 budget year, Penn Manor School Board did not apply for exceptions to exceed their Act 1 Index limit. In 2013-14, all Pennsylvania school districts were required to make a 16.93% of payroll payment to the teacher’s pension fund (PSERS). For the school budget year 2013-14, 311 Pennsylvania public school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above their index. Another 171 school districts adopted a preliminary budget leaving open the option of exceeded the Index limit. For the pension costs exception, 169 school districts received approval to exceed the Index. For special education costs, 75 districts received approval to exceed their tax limit. Eleven Pennsylvania public school districts received an approval for grandfathered construction debts.[305]

For the 2012-13 budget year, Penn Manor School Board did not apply for exceptions to exceed the Act 1 Index. In 2012-13, all Pennsylvania school districts were required to make a 12.36% of payroll payment to the teacher’s pension fund (PSERS). For 2012-2013 budget year, 274 school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above their index; while 223 school districts adopted a preliminary budget leaving open the option of exceeded the Index limit. For the exception for pension costs, 194 school districts received approval to exceed the Index. For special education costs, 129 districts received approval to exceed the tax limit.[306]

For the 2011–12 school year, the Penn Manor School Board did not apply for exceptions to exceed the Act 1 Index. Each year, the Penn Manor School Board has the option of adopting either 1) a resolution in January certifying they will not increase taxes above their index or 2) a preliminary budget in February. A school district adopting the resolution may not apply for referendum exceptions or ask voters for a tax increase above the inflation index. A specific timeline for these decisions is published in the fall of each school year, by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.[307]

According to a state report, for the 2011–2012 school year budgets, 247 school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above their index; 250 school districts adopted a preliminary budget. Of the 250 school districts that adopted a preliminary budget, 231 adopted real estate tax rates that exceeded their index. Tax rate increases in the other 19 school districts that adopted a preliminary budget did not exceed the school district’s index. Of the districts who sought exceptions 221 used the pension costs exemption and 171 sought a Special Education costs exemption. Only 1 school district sought an exemption for Nonacademic School Construction Project, while 1 sought an exception for Electoral debt for school construction.[308]

Penn Manor School Board did not apply for exceptions to exceed the Act 1 index for the budgets in 2009-10 or in 2010-11.[309][310] In the Spring of 2010, 135 Pennsylvania school boards asked to exceed their adjusted index. Approval was granted to 133 of them and 128 sought an exception for pension costs increases.[311]

Property tax relief[edit]

In 2013, Penn Manor School District's 10,919 approved homestead properties received $119.[312] The decline in amount was related to more residents applying for tax relief and a decline in table games tax revenues.

In 2009, the Homestead/Farmstead Property Tax Relief from gambling for the Penn Manor School District was $121 per approved permanent primary residence. In the district, 10,709 property owners applied for the tax relief.[313] The tax relief was subtracted from the total annual school property on the individual's tax bill. Property owners apply for the relief through the county Treasurer's office. Farmers can qualify for a farmstead exemption on building used for agricultural purposes. The farm must be at least 10 contiguous acres and must be the primary residence of the owner. Farmers can qualify for both the homestead exemption and the farmstead exemption. In Lancaster County, the highest property tax relief in 2009 was awarded to the approved property owners in School District of Lancaster at $446. Pennsylvania awarded the highest property tax relief to residents of the Chester-Upland School District in Delaware County at $632 per homestead and farmstead in 2010.[314] This was the second year Chester Upland School District was the top recipient.

Additionally, the Pennsylvania Property Tax/Rent Rebate program is provided for low income Pennsylvanians aged 65 and older; widows and widowers aged 50 and older; and people with disabilities age 18 and older. The income limit is $35,000 for homeowners. The maximum rebate for both homeowners and renters is $650. Applicants can exclude one-half (1/2) of their Social Security income, consequently individuals who have income substantially more than $35,000, may still qualify for a rebate. Individuals must apply annually for the rebate. This can be taken in addition to Homestead/Farmstead Property Tax Relief.[315]

Wellness policy[edit]

Penn Manor School Board established a district wellness policy in 2010.[316] The policy deals with nutritious meals served at school, the control of access to some foods and beverages during school hours, age appropriate nutrition education for all students, and physical education for students K-12. The policy is in response to state mandates and federal legislation (P.L. 108 – 265). The law dictates that each school district participating in a program authorized by the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq) or the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C. 1771 et seq) "shall establish a local school wellness policy by School Year 2006." Most districts identified the superintendent and school foodservice director as responsible for ensuring local wellness policy implementation.[317] The legislation placed the responsibility of developing a wellness policy at the local level so the individual needs of each district can be addressed. According to the requirements for the Local Wellness Policy, school districts must set goals for nutrition education, physical activity, campus food provision, and other school-based activities designed to promote student wellness. Additionally, districts were required to involve a broad group of individuals in policy development and to have a plan for measuring policy implementation. Districts were offered a choice of levels of implementation for limiting or prohibiting low nutrition foods on the school campus. In final implementation these regulations prohibit some foods and beverages on the school campus.[318] The Pennsylvania Department of Education required the district to submit a copy of the policy for approval.

Penn Manor School District offers both a free school breakfast and a free or reduced-price lunch to children in low income families. All students attending the school can eat breakfast and lunch. Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the federal poverty level are provided a breakfast and lunch at no cost to the family. Children from families with incomes between 130 and 185 percent of the federal poverty level can be charged no more than 30 cents per breakfast. A foster child whose care and placement is the responsibility of the State or who is placed by a court with a caretaker household is eligible for both a free breakfast and a free lunch. Runaway, homeless and Migrant Youth are also automatically eligible for free meals.[319] The meals are partially funded with federal dollars through the United States Department of Agriculture.[320]

In 2013, the USDA issued new restrictions to foods in public schools. The rules apply to foods and beverages sold on all public school district campuses during the day. They limit vending machine snacks to a maximum of 200 calories per item. Additionally, all snack foods sold at school must meet competitive nutrient standards, meaning they must have fruits, vegetables, dairy or protein in them or contain at least 10 percent of the daily value of fiber, calcium, potassium, and Vitamin D.[321] In order to comply with the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 all US public school districts are required to raise the price of their school lunches to $2.60 regardless of the actual cost of providing the lunch.[322] The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 mandates that Districts raise their full pay lunch prices every year until the price of non-subsidized lunches equals the amount the federal government reimburses schools for free meals. That subsidy in 2013-2014 was $2.93.

In 2014, President Obama ordered a prohibition of advertisements for unhealthy foods on public school campuses during the school day.[323] The Food and Drug Administration requires that students take milk as their beverage at lunch. In accordance with this law, any student requesting water in place of milk with their lunch must present a written request, signed by a doctor, documenting the need for water instead of milk.[324][325]

Penn Manor School District provides health services as mandated by the Commonwealth and the federal government. Nurses are available in each building to conduct annual health screenings (data reported to the PDE and state Department of Health) and to dispense prescribed medications to students during the school day. Students can be excluded from school unless they comply with all the State Department of Health’s extensive immunization mandates. School nurses monitor each pupil for this compliance.[326][327] Nurses also monitor each child's weight.[328]

Extracurriculars[edit]

Penn Manor School District offers a wide variety of clubs, activities and an extensive sports program. Eligibility to participate is set by school board policy[329][330] All student athletes must be passing all credits with a "C" average to participate in extracurriculars. Tutoring assistance is available and required for struggling students.[331]

By Pennsylvania law, all K-12 students in the district, including those who attend a private nonpublic school, cyber charter school, charter school and those homeschooled, are eligible to participate in the extracurricular programs, including all athletics. They must meet the same eligibility rules as the students enrolled in the district's schools.[332][333][334]

Sports[edit]

According to Pennsylvania’s Safety in Youth Sports Act, all sports coaches, paid and volunteer, are required to annually complete the Concussion Management Certification Training and present the certification before coaching.[335][336]

Coaches receive compensation as outlined in the teachers' union contract. When athletic competition exceeds the regular season, additional compensation is paid.[337] The District funds:

Varsity
Middle School Sports

According to PIAA directory July 2013[338]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ Penn Manor School Board (July 15, 2015). "Penn Manor School board Contract with Superintendent" (PDF). 
  3. ^ Penn Manor School District, History of Penn Manor School District, 2014
  4. ^ {{cite web \url=http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/districtsearch/district_detail.asp?Search=1&InstName=penn+manor&DistrictType=1&DistrictType=2&DistrictType=3&DistrictType=4&DistrictType=5&DistrictType=6&DistrictType=7&NumOfStudentsRange=more&NumOfSchoolsRange=more&ID2=4218630&details=2 |author=NCES, |title=Common Core of Data Penn Manor School District, |year=2014}}
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  8. ^ ELAINE J. JONES (June 19, 2012). "Penn Manor approves 2012-13 budget". Lancaster online. 
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