Pennsylvania Route 107

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PA Route 107 marker

PA Route 107
Route information
Maintained by PennDOT
Length 17.271 mi[1] (27.795 km)
Major junctions
West end US 6 / US 11 in Factoryville
  PA 407 in Benton Township
I-81 in Benton Township
PA 247 in Scott Township

US 6 Bus. in Mayfield
East end US 6 in Mayfield
Location
Counties Wyoming, Lackawanna
Highway system
PA 106 PA 108

Pennsylvania Route 107 (PA 107) is a 17.3-mile-long (27.8 km) state highway located in Wyoming and Lackawanna Counties in Pennsylvania. The western terminus is at U.S. Route 6 (US 6)/US 11 in Factoryville. The eastern terminus is at an interchange with the US 6 freeway in Jermyn. The length of this route serves as a shortcut for through traffic on US 6 creating a bypass of Scranton and Clarks Summit. PA 107 is a two-lane undivided road that runs through mostly rural areas in the northern part of Lackawanna County. The route intersects PA 407 in Fleetville, Interstate 81 (I-81) in Benton Township, PA 247 in Scott Township, and US 6 Business (US 6 Bus.) in Mayfield. PA 107 was designated in 1928 between US 11 in Factoryville and US 6 at Washington Avenue in Jermyn. The entire route was paved in the 1930s. The eastern terminus was cut back to US 6 at Scranton-Carbondale Highway (present US 6 Bus.) in the 1940s. PA 107 was extended back to unnumbered Washington Avenue in the 1970s and along a new road to the US 6 freeway in 1995.

Route description[edit]

PA 107 begins at an intersection with US 6/US 11 on the border of Factoryville and Clinton Township in Wyoming County, heading north into Clinton Township on a two-lane undivided road. The route heads through forested areas, curving north-northeast and passing under Norfolk Southern's Sunbury Line. The road crosses into Nicholson Township and heads northeast through more wooded areas with some homes, turning east and passing to the south of Lake Sheridan.[2][3]

PA 107 enters Benton Township in Lackawanna County and continues south of the lake before running through more woodland with some fields and homes, coming to an intersection with PA 407 in Fleetville. The road heads through more rural areas, coming to an interchange with I-81 before crossing into Scott Township. The route runs through more woods with farmland and residences, becoming Heart Lake Road and forming the border between Greenfield Township to the north and Scott Township to the south. PA 107 passes through Tompkinsville prior to turning southeast to fully enter Scott Township and pass through agricultural areas as it reaches an intersection with PA 247. The road heads through more farmland and woodland with some homes, crossing into Carbondale Township. Here, the route crosses a forested mountain. PA 107 heads into Mayfield and comes to an interchange with US 6 Bus. Past this interchange, the road turns east and becomes Rushbrook Street and enters residential areas, briefly forming the border between Mayfield to the north and Jermyn to the south before fully entering Jermyn. The route passes over the Lackawanna River and a Delaware–Lackawanna Railroad line, heading into wooded areas and crossing back into Mayfield. PA 107 comes to its eastern terminus at an interchange with the US 6 freeway on the border of Mayfield and Archbald.[2][4]

History[edit]

When Pennsylvania first legislated routes in 1911, what is now PA 107 was not given a number.[5] PA 107 was designated in 1928 to run from US 11 in Factoryville east to US 6 (Washington Avenue) in Jermyn along an unpaved road.[6] By 1930, the section of the route between PA 407 in Fleetville and PA 247 (Jordan Hollow Road) was under construction.[7] The entire length of PA 107 was paved in the 1930s.[8] The eastern terminus of the route was cut back to the relocated US 6 at the Scranton-Carbondale Highway (now US 6 Bus.) in the 1940s.[9] PA 107 was extended back east to unnumbered Washington Avenue in Jermyn in the 1970s.[10] In 1995, PA 107 was extended east from Washington Avenue to the newly-constructed US 6 freeway along a new two-lane road.[11][12][13]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Wyoming Clinton Township 0.000 0.000 US 6 / US 11 (Grand Army of the Republic Highway/Lackawanna Trail)
Lackawanna Benton Township 5.134 8.262 PA 407 – Waverly, Harford
8.670–
8.690
13.953–
13.985
I-81 – Scranton, Binghamton Exit 202 (I-81)
Scott Township 12.207 19.645 PA 247 (Wildcat Road) – Greenfield, Forest City, Montdale
Mayfield 16.048 25.827
US 6 Bus. (Scranton-Carbondale Highway)
Interchange
17.190–
17.271
27.665–
27.795
US 6 (Casey Highway) – Scranton, Carbondale Exit 5 (US 6)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

KML is from Wikidata
  1. ^ a b Bureau of Maintenance and Operations (January 2015). Roadway Management System Straight Line Diagrams (Report) (2015 ed.). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on February 17, 2011. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Google (December 8, 2011). "overview of Pennsylvania Route 107" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  3. ^ Wyoming County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Retrieved December 6, 2011. [permanent dead link]
  4. ^ Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Retrieved December 6, 2011. [permanent dead link]
  5. ^ Map of Pennsylvania Showing State Highways (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1911. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved January 1, 2014. 
  6. ^ Map of Pennsylvania (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1928. Retrieved May 7, 2015. 
  7. ^ Tourist Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1930. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved June 24, 2010. 
  8. ^ Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1940. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved December 16, 2014. 
  9. ^ Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1950. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved January 1, 2014. 
  10. ^ Pennsylvania Official Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1980. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 24, 2011. Retrieved January 29, 2015. 
  11. ^ General Highway Map Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1998. Retrieved November 2, 2015. 
  12. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000039907". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  13. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000039670". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.