Pennsylvania Route 309

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Pennsylvania Route 309 marker
Pennsylvania Route 309
PA 309 in red, PA 309 Bus. and PA 309 Truck in blue
Route information
Maintained by PennDOT
Length134.043 mi[1] (215.721 km)
ExistedFebruary 1968[2]–present
Major junctions
South end PA 611 in Philadelphia/Cheltenham
 
North end PA 29 in Monroe Township
Location
CountiesPhiladelphia, Montgomery, Bucks, Lehigh, Schuylkill, Carbon, Luzerne, Wyoming
Highway system
PA 308 PA 310
US 22PA-22 (1926).svg PA 23

Pennsylvania Route 309 (PA 309) is a state highway which runs for 134 miles (216 km) through Pennsylvania in the United States. The route runs from the interchange between PA 611 and Cheltenham Avenue on the border of Philadelphia and Cheltenham Township north to an intersection with PA 29 in Bowman Creek, a village in Monroe Township in Wyoming County. It connects Philadelphia and its northern suburbs to Allentown, Hazleton, and Wilkes-Barre. PA 309 heads north from Philadelphia and becomes a freeway called the Fort Washington Expressway through suburban areas in Montgomery County, passing through Fort Washington, before becoming a surface road called Bethlehem Pike and running through Montgomeryville. In Bucks County, the route has a freeway section bypassing Sellersville before passing through Quakertown as a surface road. PA 309 heads into the Lehigh Valley and joins Interstate 78 (I-78) on a freeway bypassing Allentown to the south before splitting to the north and running through rural areas as a surface road. The route continues north into the Coal Region and passes through Tamaqua before it reaches Hazleton. PA 309 heads into the Wyoming Valley and passes through the Wilkes-Barre area on a freeway alignment along I-81 and the North Cross Valley Expressway before turning into a surface road again and running through Dallas before reaching its northern terminus.

The surface road sections of the route between Philadelphia and the Lehigh Valley follow a turnpike called the Bethlehem Pike that was built in the 1800s. With the creation of the U.S. Highway System in 1926, U.S. Route 309 (US 309) was designated to run from US 120 (later US 422) in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia north to US 11 in Wilkes-Barre. When first designated, US 309 followed the present corridor of PA 309 to Allentown before it headed further east through Slatington, Palmerton, Lehighton, Jim Thorpe, and Nesquehoning before following present-day PA 309 between Hazleton and Wilkes-Barre. In 1930, US 309 was extended north to New York State Route 17 (NY 17) in Waverly, New York, heading north to Pittston and Tunkhannock before following US 6 between Tunkhannock and Towanda and US 220 between Towanda and Waverly. By 1940, US 309 was extended south to US 1 Bypass (US 1 Byp.)/US 13 Byp./US 422 at Ridge Avenue and City Line Avenue in Philadelphia. In the 1940s, US 309 was realigned between Ashley and Tunkhannock to head through Wilkes-Barre, Dallas, and Bowman Creek, with the former alignment between Wilkes-Barre and Pittston becoming unnumbered and becoming part of PA 92 between West Pittston and Tunkhannock. In the 1950s, US 309 was rerouted between Allentown and Hazleton to follow US 22 west to Fogelsville before turning north to Pleasant Corners and following present-day PA 309 to Hazleton. Most of the former US 309 between Allentown and Hazleton became a rerouted PA 29 (which previously followed present-day PA 309 between the two cities), and is now PA 873, PA 248, US 209, and PA 93. US 309 was realigned to the Fort Washington Expressway in 1960 to head to a new southern terminus at US 611 (Broad Street) and Stenton Avenue in Philadelphia and was also realigned to bypass Allentown. US 309 was shifted to follow present-day PA 309 between Allentown and Pleasant Corners in 1962, with PA 100 extended north along the former alignment between Fogelsville and Pleasant Corners. In 1963, the northern terminus of US 309 was cut back to US 6 in Tunkhannock. US 309 was decommissioned in 1968 and replaced with PA 309. In the 1980s, the termini of PA 309 were moved to their present locations. PA 309 was realigned to follow I-81 and the North Cross Valley Expressway through the Wilkes-Barre area in 1991.

Route description[edit]

Philadelphia and Montgomery counties[edit]

PA 309 southbound along Cheltenham Avenue on the border of Philadelphia and Cheltenham Township

PA 309 begins at an interchange between PA 611 (Old York Road) and Cheltenham Avenue on the border between the East Oak Lane section of the city of Philadelphia in Philadelphia County to the south and Cheltenham Township in Montgomery County to the north. From this interchange, the route heads northwest on four-lane divided Cheltenham Avenue along the border between Philadelphia and Cheltenham Township. A short distance past the PA 611 interchange, the road comes to an intersection with the northern terminus of Broad Street. PA 309 continues northwest as a four-lane undivided road through urban residential and business areas, passing to the north of Northwood Cemetery. The road crosses Washington Lane and heads to the south of the Greenleaf at Cheltenham shopping center before it comes to an intersection with Ogontz Avenue north of the West Oak Lane neighborhood of Philadelphia, with SEPTA's Cheltenham-Ogontz Bus Loop located on the northwest corner of the intersection.[3][4][5] At this point, PA 309 turns north-northwest onto four-lane divided Ogontz Avenue and fully enters Cheltenham Township in Montgomery County, passing businesses as it heads to the west of the shopping center. The route intersects Limekiln Pike and assumes that name, running near suburban residential areas in the community of Cedarbrook.[3][5]

PA 309 becomes a four-lane freeway called the Fort Washington Expressway and passes between a high-rise apartment complex to the west and Cheltenham High School to the east as it comes to a diamond interchange with the southern terminus of PA 152 at Easton Road near the community of Wyncote. From there, the route heads northwest and passes to the southwest of Arcadia University and to the northeast of Holy Sepulchre Cemetery before it runs near wooded areas and suburban residential development, crossing into Springfield Township. The freeway curves west and comes to a diamond interchange at Paper Mill Road, where it makes a turn to the northwest as it passes northeast of Springfield Township High School. PA 309 reaches a diamond interchange with PA 73 near the community of Oreland and continues through suburban areas, entering Whitemarsh Township and heading north as it passes near business parks, crossing the Sandy Run. The route heads north-northeast and comes to a bridge over SEPTA's Lansdale/Doylestown Line before it bends north and passes under Norfolk Southern's Morrisville Line. PA 309 enters Upper Dublin Township and comes to a modified cloverleaf interchange connecting to the Fort Washington interchange with the Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276) and Pennsylvania Avenue in the community of Fort Washington. From here, the freeway passes near business parks before heading north-northwest through wooded residential areas to a partial interchange with Highland Avenue consisting of a northbound exit and southbound entrance. The route heads north through more suburban development to the east of the borough of Ambler, passing west of Upper Dublin High School, and reaches a northbound exit and southbound entrance at Susquehanna Road. PA 309 curves northwest and comes to a southbound exit and northbound entrance at Butler Pike a short distance later. The freeway runs through woodland and residential development, crossing into Lower Gwynedd Township and turning north to reach a diamond interchange serving Norristown Road to the east of Spring House. The route runs near business parks and curves northwest, heading near residential development before it reaches the north end of the Fort Washington Expressway and merges onto Bethlehem Pike, with a southbound exit and northbound entrance for Bethlehem Pike.[3][5]

PA 309 northbound concurrent with US 202 Bus. in Montgomeryville

PA 309 continues north on Bethlehem Pike, a four-lane divided highway with a Jersey barrier and several intersections controlled by jughandles. The route comes to a junction with PA 63, at which point it enters Horsham Township. There, the road narrows to four lanes and passes shopping centers, crossing into Montgomery Township and heading into the North Penn Valley region. The route bends to the northwest and continues through commercial areas, running to the west of a quarry past the Hartman Road intersection. PA 309 passes more businesses as it continues along the four-lane divided highway and comes to an interchange with the US 202 parkway consisting of a ramp from northbound PA 309 to northbound US 202 and a two-way quadrant ramp providing all other movements; PA 309 also crosses under the US 202 Parkway Trail that follows US 202. The road intersects US 202 Bus. (Dekalb Pike) and Upper State Road in the community of Montgomery Square. At this point, US 202 Bus. becomes concurrent with PA 309 and the road passes between the Montgomery Mall to the west and the Airport Square shopping center to the east. The two routes head north past more businesses and become a five-lane road with a center left-turn lane past the North Wales Road intersection. PA 309/US 202 Bus. turns into a four-lane divided highway again and heads into the community of Montgomeryville.[3][5] Here, the highway comes to the Five Points intersection, where PA 463 crosses PA 309/US 202 Bus. and US 202 Bus. splits from PA 309 by heading northeast onto Doylestown Road.[3][5][6]

Past this intersection, the route transitions into a five-lane road with a center left-turn lane and runs north past more businesses with some wooded residential development, bending northwest. The road enters Hatfield Township and reaches the community of Colmar, where it intersects Broad Street and crosses SEPTA's Lansdale/Doylestown Line at-grade to the west of Colmar station. PA 309 continues past commercial development, crossing the West Branch Neshaminy Creek and passing through the community of Trewigtown.[3][5] The route becomes a four-lane divided highway and comes to an intersection with Line Lexington Road/County Line Road in the community of Line Lexington, at which point it turns northwest and forms the border between Hatfield Township in Montgomery County to the southwest and New Britain Township in Bucks County to the northeast. After the Hilltown Pike junction, the road runs along the border between Hatfield Township, Montgomery County to the southwest and Hilltown Township, Bucks County to the northeast and heads northwest through commercial development and some farmland as a five-lane road with a center left-turn lane. In the community of Unionville, the route intersects Unionville Pike, which heads southwest toward the borough of Hatfield.[3][5][7]

Bucks County[edit]

PA 309 leaves the North Penn Valley region and becomes a four-lane freeway called the Sellersville Bypass, coming to a northbound exit and southbound entrance with Bethlehem Pike. At this point, the route curves north-northwest to fully enter Hilltown Township in Bucks County. The freeway runs through wooded areas with nearby residential and commercial development and comes to a diamond interchange with PA 113 northeast of the borough of Souderton. PA 309 turns north and runs through woodland and farmland with some nearby development, curving northwest and crossing into West Rockhill Township. The route passes over the Bethlehem Line, a railroad line that is owned by SEPTA and operated by the East Penn Railroad, and reaches a diamond interchange with the northern terminus of PA 152 that provides access to the borough of Sellersville to the northeast and the borough of Telford to the southwest. Past this interchange, the freeway heads through wooded areas and crosses the East Branch Perkiomen Creek before it passes near farmland and curves north. PA 309 runs through woodland with some farm fields and comes to a diamond interchange at Lawn Avenue, which heads west to provide access to PA 563 near the borough of Perkasie, before passing under PA 563. From here, the route heads near more farms and woods and curves northwest, running through dense forests and bending north. PA 309 comes to a southbound exit and northbound entrance with Bethlehem Pike, at which point the Sellersville Bypass freeway ends.[3][7]

PA 309 northbound in Quakertown

From this point, the route heads north-northwest through the community of Rich Hill and crosses into Richland Township, where it becomes four-lane undivided South West End Boulevard and passes through a mix of farm fields and woodland with some commercial development, soon gaining a center left-turn lane and crossing Morgan Creek. The road briefly becomes a divided highway at the Tollgate Road intersection before it continues past businesses as a five-lane road with a center left-turn lane, with another divided highway stretch at the entrance to the Richland Plaza shopping center. PA 309 enters the borough of Quakertown upon crossing Beaver Run and runs past more businesses as a five-lane road containing a center turn lane. The route becomes a divided highway for a short distance to the south of the Trumbauersville Road intersection before turning into an undivided highway, briefly gaining a median at the Park Avenue intersection before the median transitions into a center left-turn lane. PA 309 turns into a four-lane divided highway and comes to a junction with the western terminus of PA 313 and the northern terminus of PA 663. From this junction, the road becomes North West End Boulevard and runs past shopping centers, becoming the border between Richland Township to the west and Quakertown to the east. PA 309 fully enters Richland Township again and becomes a five-lane road with a center left-turn lane, passing commercial development and woodland. The route briefly turns into a divided highway again as it crosses West Pumping Station Road and heads to the east of a shopping center. PA 309 continues north past wooded areas and businesses as a five-lane road with a center turn lane, passing to the west of the community of Shelly. The road crosses into Springfield Township and becomes Bethlehem Pike, running north-northwest through more forested areas with some commercial development.[3][7]

Lehigh County[edit]

PA 309 enters Lehigh County, which is in the Lehigh Valley region, and forms the border between the borough of Coopersburg to the west and Upper Saucon Township to the east, heading north and fully entering Coopersburg. The route becomes South 3rd Street and passes commercial establishments. before it turns into a four-lane divided highway and passes a mix of homes and businesses. Upon crossing State Street, the road becomes North 3rd Street, running past more development. PA 309 becomes the border between Upper Saucon Township to the west and Coopersburg to the east and passes a couple shopping centers before fully entering Upper Saucon Township and passing between woodland and commercial development to the west and farmland to the east as an unnamed road. The route curves to the northwest and heads through wooded areas, splitting into a one-way pair carrying two lanes in each direction and reaching an intersection with the southern terminus of PA 378 in the community of Center Valley. Past this intersection, the northbound direction of PA 309 passes homes as Main Street, heading south of Southern Lehigh High School, while the southbound direction runs through wooded areas with nearby residential subdivisions. Both directions of the route rejoin and continue northwest through residential and commercial development and some woods as a four-lane unnamed divided highway. The road runs through farmland and residential subdivisions before it crosses Saucon Creek and reaches an intersection with jughandles at West Saucon Valley Road/Center Valley Parkway.[3][8]

Past this intersection, PA 309 becomes a four-lane freeway and comes to an interchange with I-78 and the southern terminus of PA 145 in the community of Lanark. At this point, PA 309 heads west concurrent with I-78 westbound on a six-lane freeway, while PA 145 northbound provides access to the city of Allentown. The highway comes to a southbound exit and northbound entrance with Rock Road that provides a connection to PA 145 in the community of Summit Lawn, at which point it crosses into Salisbury Township. Following this, I-78/PA 309 descends forested South Mountain. After crossing the mountain, the freeway heads into the city of Allentown and passes near neighborhoods, coming to a northbound exit ramp serving Emaus Avenue. The highway runs near industrial areas and passes over Norfolk Southern's Reading Line before it comes to the Lehigh Street exit. I-78/PA 309 heads south of Allentown Queen City Municipal Airport and runs near residential areas before running through woodland, passing through a small section of Salisbury Township before heading back into Allentown and crossing Little Lehigh Creek. The freeway heads back into Salisbury Township and runs between residential areas to the north and office buildings to the south before reaching an interchange with the northern terminus of the southern section of PA 29 at Cedar Crest Boulevard. Past this interchange, the highway heads north of Lehigh Valley Hospital–Cedar Crest and crosses into South Whitehall Township, passing between residential areas to the north and farm fields to the south and curving northwest to reach an interchange with the northern terminus of US 222 and the southern terminus of PA 222 at Hamilton Boulevard, which provides access to the cities of Allentown and Reading. From here, the freeway enters Lower Macungie Township and runs past commercial development to the southwest of the Dorney Park & Wildwater Kingdom amusement park. PA 309 splits from I-78 at a partial interchange and continues north along a four-lane freeway, passing through a small corner of Upper Macungie Township before entering South Whitehall Township again. The route continues north past farmland with some residential and commercial development and comes to a cloverleaf interchange at Tilghman Street. The freeway runs northwest near more homes and commercial establishments and reaches a cloverleaf interchange with the US 22 freeway a short distance east of that route's interchange with the Pennsylvania Turnpike Northeast Extension (I-476).[3][8]

PA 309 southbound in South Whitehall Township

Past the US 22 interchange, the freeway ends and PA 309 continues northwest as an unnamed four-lane divided highway with at-grade intersections, passing near commercial development. The road curves to the west-northwest and heads through the community of Walbert, where it crosses Norfolk Southern's C&F Secondary at-grade and narrows to two lanes. The route becomes a two-lane undivided road and runs near businesses, crossing under I-476. PA 309 curves north and heads through a mix of farm fields, woodland, and homes and businesses, passing through the communities of Guthsville, where it crosses Jordan Creek, and Orefield. The road bends to the north-northwest and continues into North Whitehall Township, where it passes more residences and a few businesses along with some rural land. The route briefly widens into a four-lane divided highway and runs through more developed areas as a three lane road with a center left-turn lane, passing to the east of Lehigh Carbon Community College and the Lehigh Career and Technical Institute. PA 309 becomes two lanes again and runs past homes and businesses in the community of Schnecksville, where it curves northwest and comes to an intersection with the southern terminus of PA 873. Here, PA 309 turns to the west and heads northwest near residential developments. The road bends west and winds through a mix of farmland and woodland, heading into Heidelberg Township. The route runs through more rural land with occasional development and reaches the community of Pleasant Corners, where it crosses Jordan Creek and comes to an intersection with the northern terminus of PA 100. PA 309 continues west through agricultural areas with some woods and homes and passes south of Northwestern Lehigh High School as it enters Lynn Township. The road heads to the north of a golf course before it comes to a junction with the northern terminus of PA 143 east of the community of New Tripoli, where it briefly becomes a divided highway. At this point, the route turns to the northwest as an undivided road and passes through farmland with some trees, homes, and businesses, crossing Ontelaunee Creek. The road gains a second northbound lane further to the north. PA 309 curves to the west-southwest and ascends forested Blue Mountain.[3][8]

Schuylkill and Carbon counties[edit]

At the summit of Blue Mountain, PA 309 becomes a two-lane road and enters West Penn Township in Schuylkill County, crossing the Appalachian Trail. The route heads west and descends the mountain as West Penn Pike, a three-lane road with one northbound lane and two southbound lanes. At the base of Blue Mountain, the road heads northwest through wooded areas with some farm fields. PA 309 narrows to two lanes and crosses Lizard Creek before it comes to an intersection with PA 895 in the community of Snyders. The road continues northwest through forested areas with some fields and residential and commercial development, passing through the community of Leibeyville. The route curves to the west and widens to four lanes before it comes to an intersection with PA 443, at which point that route heads west for a concurrency with PA 309. The two routes pass through wooded areas with some homes and reach the community of South Tamaqua, where PA 443 splits to the southwest. PA 309 heads northwest near some coal fields before curving north into forested areas and running along the east bank of the Little Schuylkill River, passing between Second Mountain to the west and Mauch Chunk Ridge to the east. The road passes near a few commercial establishments and enters the borough of Tamaqua, continuing through forests and running between Sharp Mountain to the west and Pisgah Mountain to the east. The route becomes two-lane Center Street and runs past businesses, crossing the Little Schuylkill River and a Reading Blue Mountain and Northern Railroad line at-grade.[3][9] PA 309 runs past homes and businesses and comes to the Five Points intersection with US 209 in the center of Tamaqua.[3][9][10] Past this intersection, the route splits into a one-way pair along Mauch Chunk Street northbound and North Railroad Street southbound, running to the east of the Reading Blue Mountain and Northern Railroad's Reading Division line and passing east of the former Tamaqua station along the railroad line. The one-way pair carries one lane in each direction. Northbound PA 309 shifts to Pine Street and the route continues to follow the one-way streets past residences and a few businesses. Both directions of PA 309 rejoin along an unnamed three-lane road with a center left-turn lane and crosses the Little Schuylkill River, heading into forested areas to the east of the river and to the west of Nesquehoning Mountain and curving northwest.[3][9]

PA 309 southbound in McAdoo

The route leaves Tamaqua for Rush Township and the name changes to Claremont Avenue, becoming a three-lane road with two northbound lanes and one southbound lane and curving to the north away from the Little Schuylkill River. The road heads into the community of Hometown and runs near homes and a few businesses, curving northwest and coming to an intersection with PA 54. From here, PA 309 widens into a four-lane divided highway and heads past businesses. The route comes to a bridge over the Reading Blue Mountain and Northern Railroad's Reading Division line and runs through wooded areas and commercial development. The road runs through forests and curves north, passing to the west of Broad Mountain. PA 309 bends to the north-northwest and passes through the communities of Still Creek and Ginther. The route heads back into forested areas and crosses into Kline Township, curving to the northeast and north along Mile Hill Road. The road runs north-northeast and passes to the west of a large coal mine before it comes to a trumpet interchange with a ramp providing access to I-81 to the west. Past this interchange, PA 309 heads through forests with some development before passing under a Reading Blue Mountain and Northern Railroad line and entering the borough of McAdoo. Here, the route becomes South Kennedy Drive and narrows to a two-lane undivided road, running past homes and a few businesses. The road crosses Blaine Street in the center of the borough and becomes North Kennedy Drive, passing more residences. PA 309 leaves McAdoo and heads through a small section of Kline Township.[3][9] The route enters Banks Township in Carbon County and becomes unnamed, heading to the east of a coal mine before running past homes in the community of Audenried.[3][11]

Luzerne and Wyoming counties[edit]

PA 309 heads into Hazle Township in Luzerne County, which is in the Wyoming Valley region, and becomes South Church Street, running past coal mines and widening to four lanes, curving to the north. The road runs through wooded areas with some homes and businesses and comes to an intersection with PA 424, where it briefly becomes a divided highway. Past this intersection, the route becomes undivided again and crosses Norfolk Southern's Sheppton Industrial Track at-grade, heading past homes and commercial buildings and curving northeast into the city of Hazleton. PA 309 runs through commercial areas and woodland, narrowing to two lanes. The road passes under Norfolk Southern's Hazleton Running Track and runs through residential areas before passing businesses and becoming a three-lane road with a center turn lane. The route crosses the Hazleton Running Track at-grade and passes west of the Church Street Station serving HPT buses as it heads into the downtown area of Hazleton, where it reaches a junction with PA 93. Past this junction, PA 309 becomes two-lane North Church Street and leaves the downtown to head past homes. The road curves to the north at the Diamond Avenue intersection and continues through residential areas, gaining a center left-turn lane coming to an intersection with the northern terminus of PA 924. The route runs through more of the city and heads past businesses as it reaches a junction with the western terminus of PA 940 on the northern border of Hazleton. At this point, PA 309 crosses back into Hazle Township and runs through commercial areas as an unnamed road, passing to the west of Church Hill Mall and widening to five lanes. The road passes to the east of Hazleton Municipal Airport and runs past residences and businesses in the community of Milnesville, becoming a four-lane divided highway at the Airport Road intersection. The route becomes undivided again and runs through wooded areas with some homes, passing to the west of a coal mine and curving northeast.[3][12]

PA 309 southbound in Wright Township, Luzerne County

PA 309 enters Butler Township and becomes South Hunter Highway, heading through forested areas as it traverses Buck Mountain as a two-lane road, gaining a second southbound lane as it descends the mountain. The route turns to the north and crosses Little Nescopeck Creek, running through a mix of fields, woods, and development as a two-lane road briefly before becoming four lanes. The road heads northeast and runs through forests to the west of Green Mountain, narrowing to two lanes before becoming three lanes with two southbound lanes and one northbound lane. PA 309 bends to the north again and becomes four-lane undivided North Hunter Highway, running through wooded areas with some homes and businesses. The road crosses Nescopeck Creek and passes through the communities of Honey Hole and Edgewood. The route becomes a divided highway and comes to a diamond interchange with I-80. Past this interchange, PA 309 becomes a three-lane undivided road with two northbound lanes and one southbound lane and runs through wooded areas with some residences and commercial establishments, passing by the entrance of the community of Sand Springs. The road curves to the north-northeast and traverses forested Nescopeck Mountain, widening to four lanes as it comes to the summit in the community of Nescopeck Pass and bends north. The route heads into Dorrance Township and becomes South Mountain Boulevard, heading northeast to descend Nescopeck Mountain with one northbound lane and two southbound lanes. PA 309 switches to two northbound lanes and one southbound lane and heads into Wright Township, becoming a three-lane road with a center turn lane as it passes near wooded residential development and runs through the community of Konns Corners. The road runs through forests with some commercial development, passing east of Crestwood High School and crossing Bow Creek before entering Fairview Township. The route heads near homes and businesses in the community of Fairview Heights, becoming North Mountain Boulevard and widening to five lanes. PA 309 narrows back to three lanes and crosses Big Wapwallopen Creek before it heads through the community of Mountain Top, curving to the northwest and coming to an intersection with the northern terminus of PA 437 in the community of Fairview. The road runs through forested areas as it passes through Solomon Gap in Penobscot Mountain, narrowing to two lanes before turning into a four-lane divided highway. The route curves north and crosses Solomon Creek as it enters Hanover Township, with the median widening as it continues to wind north through the gap in the mountain east of the creek. The median narrows and PA 309 crosses Pine Creek as it continues northwest, passing southwest of a section of the Pinchot State Forest.[3][12]

PA 309 as the North Cross Valley Expressway in the Wyoming Valley, looking south

PA 309 turns north and crosses into the borough of Ashley, where it comes to an interchange with I-81. At this point, PA 309 heads northeast concurrent with I-81 on a four-lane freeway while PA 309 Bus. continues north towards the city of Wilkes-Barre. Within the interchange, the highway crosses back into Hanover Township before entering Wilkes-Barre Township. I-81/PA 309 runs near residential and commercial development, with PA 309 Bus. closely parallel to the northwest. The freeway bends farther from the business route and passes through the community of Georgetown, running through wooded areas and coming to a trumpet interchange which provides access to Highland Park Boulevard, serving multiple shopping centers and the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza, where the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins of the American Hockey League play. I-81/PA 309 heads through more woodland with some nearby development to the northwest, crossing into Plains Township and curving north.[3][12]

PA 309 splits from I-81 at an interchange by heading northwest on the North Cross Valley Expressway, a six-lane freeway, while PA 115 heads east (south) along the interchange's right-of-way. The route follows the North Cross Valley Expressway through wooded areas with adjacent development, coming to an interchange with the northern terminus of PA 309 Bus. and the southern terminus of PA 315. At this point, the freeway enters the city of Wilkes-Barre and narrows to four lanes, running near homes and businesses and curving northwest. PA 309 passes over a Luzerne and Susquehanna Railway line and comes to an interchange with North Wilkes-Barre Boulevard that provides access to downtown Wilkes-Barre. The route leaves Wilkes-Barre for Plains Township again and crosses over Mill Creek and Norfolk Southern's Sunbury Line before heading near coal fields and reaching a diamond interchange serving South River Street to the southwest of Plains. Past here, the freeway passes over a Reading Blue Mountain and Northern Railroad line and the Susquehanna River, at which point it enters the borough of Forty Fort and comes to a northbound exit and southbound entrance at Rutter Avenue that provides indirect access to US 11. PA 309 continues into the borough of Kingston and runs near residential and commercial development, coming to a southbound exit and northbound entrance at US 11. The route widens to six lanes and runs near more development, passing over a Luzerne and Susquehanna Railway line and entering the borough of Luzerne. The freeway reaches a northbound exit and southbound entrance at Union Street, where it narrows to four lanes and crosses into the borough of Pringle, heading across Toby Creek. PA 309 continues northwest and passes through the borough of Courtdale before it comes to a southbound exit and northbound entrance with Main Street on the border between Courtdale to the west and Luzerne to the east.[3][12]

PA 309 northbound in Monroe Township, Wyoming County, very close to its northern terminus at PA 29

At this interchange, the North Cross Valley Expressway ends and PA 309 becomes four-lane at-grade divided South Memorial Highway, crossing Toby Creek again and heading into the Back Mountain region of Luzerne County. The route runs through Kingston Township before heading across Toby Creek back into Courtdale and curving west. The road crosses the creek back into Kingston Township and heads northwest through forested areas alongside the creek between Larksville Mountain to the west and Bunker Hill to the east. The route runs past residences and businesses in the community of Trucksville, becoming a five-lane road with a center left-turn lane. PA 309 continues north-northwest through wooded areas of development on North Memorial Highway, becoming a divided highway in the community of Shavertown and crossing Center Street. The route becomes a four-lane undivided road and heads into Dallas Township, passing under Overbrook Avenue. The road continues past commercial development as Memorial Highway and gains a center turn lane, heading into the borough of Dallas. PA 309 comes to an intersection with the southern terminus of PA 415 and turns northwest onto Tunkhannock Highway, a three-lane road with a center left-turn lane. The road runs through wooded residential areas and heads back into Dallas Township, curving to the north. The route bends northwest and passes near businesses. PA 309 curves north and narrows to two lanes, passing through wooded arras with some fields and development. The road turns northwest and continues through rural land, heading back to the north near the community of Kunkle and crossing Leonard Creek.[3][12] The route heads into Monroe Township in Wyoming County and continues through forests with some fields and homes to the west of Leonard Creek as an unnamed road, bending northwest and passing through the community of Beaumont. PA 309 runs through more rural areas and comes to its northern terminus at an intersection with PA 29 near the community of Bowman Creek, where the road continues north as part of PA 29 towards the borough of Tunkhannock.[3][13]

History[edit]

U.S. Route 309 marker

U.S. Route 309

LocationPhiladelphiaTunkhannock
Length142.25 mi[2] (228.93 km)
Existed1926–1968

The portion of PA 309 between Philadelphia and the Lehigh Valley follows the routing of a Native American path now referred to as the "Minsi Trail" that dates back to the 18th century. This path, named after the Minsi Indians, connected the Blue Mountains to areas to the south.[14] A highway called the King's Road was created between Philadelphia and Bethlehem in the 1760s along the route of the Minsi Trail; the first trip along this road was made by stage wagon in 1763.[15] In 1804, a turnpike called the Bethlehem Turnpike was created to run between Philadelphia and Bethlehem.[16] The turnpike was authorized to collect tolls in 1834, with many of its tollgates erected.[17] The Bethlehem Pike became a free road in 1904 and tolls were removed in 1910.[18]

Following the passage of the Sproul Road Bill in 1911, what would become US 309 was designated as Legislative Route 153 between Philadelphia and Allentown, Legislative Route 163 between Allentown and Mauch Chunk (present-day Jim Thorpe), part of Legislative Route 162 between Mauch Chunk and Nesquehoning, and Legislative Route 170 between Nesquehoning and Wilkes-Barre. Meanwhile, the present-day corridor of PA 309 between Schnecksville and Tamaqua was designated as Legislative Route 226, between Tamaqua and Hazleton as Legislative Route 185, and between Wilkes-Barre and Bowman Creek as part of Legislative Route 11.[19] With the creation of the U.S. Highway System in 1926, US 309, a spur of US 9, was designated to run from US 120/PA 13 in Philadelphia north to US 11/PA 19 in Wilkes-Barre. From Philadelphia, the route followed Bethlehem Pike north through Spring House, Montgomeryville, Sellersville, and Quakertown to Center Valley. From here, US 309 continued northwest to Allentown and passed through the city along Jordan Street, 5th Street, Auburn Street, Lehigh Street, 7th Street, Hamilton Street, 17th Street, Liberty Street, and 19th Street. North of Allentown, the route continued west along Walbert Avenue before turning north at Walbert and passing through Schnecksville, Neffs, and Slatington. US 309 crossed the Lehigh River and continued north along the east bank of the river through Palmerton and Bowmanstown to Weissport, where it intersected US 209. At this point, US 309 headed west concurrent with US 209 through Lehighton, Mauch Chunk, Nesquehoning, Lansford, and Coaldale to Tamaqua. At Tamaqua, US 309 split from US 209 and headed north through McAdoo, Hazleton, Mountain Top, and Ashley to Wilkes-Barre. In Wilkes-Barre, US 309 followed Hazle Avenue, Park Avenue, South Street, and River Street to its terminus at US 11/PA 19.[20][21] In 1927, PA 12 was designated concurrent with US 309 between Philadelphia and Center Valley while PA 22 was designated concurrent with US 309 between US 22/PA 3 in Allentown and US 11/PA 19 in Wilkes-Barre. The section of present-day PA 309 between southeast of Dallas and Bowman Creek was designated as part of the northern section of PA 62 in 1927.[22]

Pennsylvania Route 22 marker

Pennsylvania Route 22

LocationAllentownWilkes-Barre
Existed1927–1928

Pennsylvania Route 130 marker

Pennsylvania Route 130

LocationAllentownWilkes-Barre
Existed1928–1930

By 1928, US 309 was shifted to a more direct alignment between Nesquehoning and Hazleton. By this time, the entire length of US 309 was paved while the state highway was under construction between Quakertown and Center Valley and for a distance to the north of Hazleton. In 1928, the present-day alignment of PA 309 between Schnecksville and Hazleton was designated as part of PA 29 while part of PA 92 was designated along the present-day section of PA 309 from southeast of Dallas north to Bowman Creek, replacing PA 62. At this time, this portion of PA 29 was paved between US 309 Schnecksville and PA 143 in New Tripoli and between PA 925 south of Tamaqua and US 309 in Hazleton while PA 92 was paved to a point north of Dallas.[23] In 1928, PA 312 was designated concurrent with US 309 between PA 12 in Center Valley and US 22/PA 3 in Allentown while PA 130 replaced the concurrent PA 22 designation north of Allentown.[24] The under construction portions of US 309 between Quakertown and Center Valley and to the north of Hazleton were completed by 1930 while the concurrent PA 12, PA 312, and PA 130 designations were removed from US 309 by 1930.[25] In 1930, US 309 was extended north from Wilkes-Barre to NY 17 (Chemung Street) in Waverly, New York. From Wilkes-Barre, the route followed the former alignment of US 11 along River Street and River Road to Pittston. US 309 ran northwest concurrent with US 11 to West Pittston, where it continued northwest along the former alignment of PA 29 parallel to the Susquehanna River to an intersection with US 6 in Osterhout. From here, US 309 continued northwest concurrent with US 6 through Tunkhannock and Wyalusing to Towanda. In Towanda, US 309 split from US 6 and headed north concurrent with US 220 through Athens, Sayre, and South Waverly before US 220/US 309 crossed into New York and ended at NY 17.[25][26] By 1930, PA 29 was under construction from Blue Mountain to south of Tamaqua.[25]

PA 309 northbound near Hatfield

The southern terminus of US 309 was extended from its previous location at US 422 (Germantown Avenue) in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia to US 1 Byp./US 13 Byp./US 422 at Ridge Avenue and City Line Avenue in Philadelphia by 1940, following US 422 Byp. along Germantown Avenue before heading south along Allens Lane and Lincoln Drive. By 1940, the alignment of US 309 in Allentown was shifted to follow 7th Street and US 22 along Tilghman Street to 19th Street while the alignment in Wilkes-Barre was shifted at South Street to follow Washington Street, Butler Street, Main Street, and Courtright Street to River Street.[27] By 1940, US 309 was widened to a multilane road between PA 73 in Whitemarsh and Allentown, along the US 209 concurrency between Lehighton and Packerton, for a short distance in Mountain Top, between Ashley and Wilkes-Barre, between Wilkes-Barre and US 11 in Pittston, along the US 6 concurrency between PA 92 and PA 29 in Tunkhannock and a stretch to the northwest of Tunkhannock, and along the US 220 concurrency between Athens and Sayre. By this time, the entire length of PA 29 between Schnecksville and Hazleton was paved, with the route realigned to bypass New Tripoli along the present-day alignment of PA 309 and the stretch across Blue Mountain and between PA 925 in South Tamaqua and US 209 in Tamaqua widened to a multilane road. The section of PA 115 between Wilkes-Barre and PA 92 near Luzerne that would later become part of US 309 was widened to a multilane road while the section of PA 92 between north of Dallas and PA 29 in Bowman Creek was paved.[28]

In the 1940s, US 309 was shifted to a new alignment between Ashley and Tunkhannock. From Ashley, US 309 was realigned to head through Wilkes-Barre along newly-built Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard, Spring Street, and Scott Street to PA 115, where it became concurrent with PA 115 along Kidder Street, Butler Street, Main Street, Courtright Street, and River Street to Pierce Street. From here US 309/PA 115 followed Pierce Street across the Susquehanna River to Kingston, where the two routes followed US 11 along Wyoming Avenue and then Union Street before continuing to Luzerne. Past Luzerne, US 309 split from PA 115 and followed the former alignment of PA 92 to Bowman Creek and the former alignment of PA 29 to US 6 in Tunkhannock. The former alignment of US 309 between Wilkes-Barre and Tunkhannock became an unnumbered road between Wilkes-Barre and Pittston and PA 92 between West Pittston and Tunkhannock.[29][30] In 1948, US 309 was dedicated as the Joseph W. Hunter Highway in honor of the first highway commissioner in Pennsylvania.[2] By 1950, US 309 was widened to a multilane road for a short stretch north of Philadelphia, along its new alignment between Ashley and Wilkes-Barre, between Luzerne and PA 415 in Dallas, and along the US 6 concurrency between PA 87 in Russel Hill and PA 267 in Meshoppen while PA 29 was widened to a multilane road between PA 895 in Snyders and PA 443, between US 209 in Tamaqua and Ginther, and between McAdoo and Audenried.[29]

In the 1950s, US 309 was moved to a different alignment between Allentown and Hazleton. The route followed 7th Street and MacArthur Road before heading west along with US 22 on the Lehigh Valley Thruway to Fogelsville. From Fogelsville, US 309 turned north and replaced PA 100 between Fogelsville and Pleasant Corners and PA 29 between Pleasant Corners and Hazleton. The former alignment of US 309 between Allentown and Hazleton became an unnumbered road between Allentown and Walbert and a realigned PA 29 between Walbert and Hazleton; PA 29 between Walbert and Hazleton is now PA 309 between Walbert and Schnecksville, PA 873 between Schnecksville and Lehigh Gap, PA 248 between Lehigh Gap and Weissport, US 209 between Weissport and Nesquehoning, and PA 93 between Nesquehoning and Hazleton. The section of PA 29 between Schnecksville and Pleasant Corners became unnumbered following the realignment of PA 29. By 1960, US 309 was widened to a multilane road between Hazleton and Mountain Top, between PA 415 in Dallas and Kunkle, and along the US 6 concurrency between north of Tunkhannock and PA 87 in Russel Hill and was upgraded to a divided highway along the PA 443 concurrency south of Tamaqua, between PA 45 in Hometown and McAdoo, between Audenried and Hazleton, along multiple short stretches between Hazleton and Mountain Top, and between Mountain Top and Ashley, and for a stretch along the US 6 concurrency to the north of PA 87 in Russel Hill.[31]

PA 309 northbound approaching interchange with PA 113 in Hilltown Township

The late 1950s saw the beginnings of bypasses on the route. North of Philadelphia, the Fort Washington Expressway from the PA 73 interchange to US 309 (Bethlehem Pike) north of Spring House was built in 1958;[32][33] the rest of that freeway from PA 73 south to PA 152 in Wyncote was built in 1960.[34][35] Upon completion of the Fort Washington Expressway, US 309 was rerouted to follow the Fort Washington Expressway before continuing south along Ogontz Avenue and Stenton Avenue to end at US 611 (now PA 611) at Broad Street in North Philadelphia; US 309 replaced the PA 152 designation along Ogontz Avenue and Stenton Avenue.[31][36] There were plans made by the Philadelphia City Planning Commission from the late 1940s until the mid 1970s to extend the Fort Washington Expressway south to Center City Philadelphia. The freeway was planned to continue south from its current terminus in Wyncote into Philadelphia and intersect US 1 (Roosevelt Expressway) before terminating at a proposed Girard Avenue Expressway. In 1969, it was estimated the freeway between Wyncote and US 1 would cost $50 million and be completed by 1975 while the freeway between US 1 and the Girard Avenue Expressway would cost $44 million and be completed by 1985. The southern extension of the Fort Washington Expressway was never built due to rising construction costs and community opposition. On July 1, 1977, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) halted spending on proposed highway projects, and the Fort Washington Expressway extension was removed from plans by the Philadelphia City Planning Commission. There were also plans to extend the Fort Washington Expressway northwest and connect to the Pennsylvania Turnpike Northeast Extension before the freeway would continue northeast and connect to the southern terminus of the Sellersville Bypass. In 1983, a scaled-down proposal called for the Fort Washington Expressway to be extended north and end at the Pennsylvania Turnpike Northeast Extension near Lansdale. Interchanges along this proposed extension were to be located at Bethlehem Pike, North Wales Road, PA 63, and PA 463.[37]

A freeway bypass of to the west of Allentown from US 309 in Lanark to US 22 near Walbert was built in 1958.[31][38][39] Upon completion of this bypass, US 309 was rerouted to follow it from Lanark north to US 22, PA 29 was designated onto the bypass north of Cedar Crest Boulevard and continued north as a divided highway to north of Walbert, and US 222 was designated onto the bypass from Hamilton Boulevard to its terminus at US 22.[40] The former alignment of US 309 through Allentown became unnumbered until it was designated as a southern extension of PA 145 in 1991.[40][41] On June 18, 1962, the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) approved the realignment of US 309 to the modern-day alignment of PA 309 between US 22 near Allentown and Pleasant Corners, following PA 29 between Allentown and the intersection with present-day PA 873 in Schnecksville before heading west between Schnecksville and Pleasant Corners. PA 100 was extended north from Fogelsville to Pleasant Corners along the former alignment of US 309.[42][43] The concurrent PA 29 designation was removed from US 309 between Allentown and Schnecksville in 1966.[43][44] US 222 was also removed from US 309 in the 1960s.[43]

PA 309 northbound past PA 63 in Horsham Township

The north end of US 309 between Tunkhannock and Waverly, New York had always been shared with other U.S. highways (US 6 and US 220). On June 19, 1963, AASHO approved the removal of the US 309 designation between US 6 in Tunkhannock and the New York border, eliminating the concurrencies with US 6 and US 220. This truncation left the northern terminus of US 309 at US 6 in Tunkhannock.[45] As a result of this, the route was entirely located in Pennsylvania and no longer met the U.S. Highway standards set forth by AASHO, which discourages routes within a single state.[2] On October 14, 1967, AASHO approved the elimination of the US 309 designation.[46] US 309 was decommissioned in February 1968 and was replaced by PA 309. Signs were changed by the end of the month. In 1967, work began on an freeway for US 309 to bypass Sellersville from just north of the border between Montgomery and Bucks counties to just south of Quakertown. This bypass opened in 1969 as part of PA 309.[2] By 1970, PA 309 was upgraded to a divided highway between the north end of the Fort Washington Expressway and US 202 (Dekalb Pike) in Montgomeryville, US 202/PA 463 in Montgomeryville and the south end of the Sellersville Bypass, the north end of the Sellersville Bypass and the south end of the freeway bypass of Allentown in Lanark, and Luzerne and PA 415 in Dallas.[43] By 1980, PA 309 was realigned through the Wilkes-Barre area to follow PA 315 along Blackman Street, Hazle Avenue, Park Avenue, South Street, River Street, Market Street, and US 11; an extended PA 315 was designated onto the former portion of PA 309 along Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard, Spring Street, and Scott Street while an extended PA 115 was designated onto the former portion of PA 309 along Kidder Street, Butler Street, Main Street, Courtright Street, River Street, and Pierce Street.[47] By 1989, the northern terminus of PA 309 was cut back from US 6 in Tunkhannock to its current location, eliminating the concurrency with PA 29 between Bowman Creek and Tunkhannock.[48] Also by this time, PA 309 was rerouted to follow Cheltenham Avenue to reach its current southern terminus at PA 611 instead of following Ogontz Avenue and Stenton Avenue to PA 611.[49] By 1989, PA 309 was upgraded to a divided highway along the concurrency with US 202 (now US 202 Bus.) in Montgomeryville. In 1989, the PA 309 freeway bypass of Allentown between Lanark and north of US 222 became part of I-78.[48]

On June 21, 1960, plans were announced to construct the North Cross Valley Expressway to link the Back Mountain region to I-81 in Luzerne County. Construction on the highway began in 1964. The North Cross Valley Expressway was built in stages.[50] The section of the highway from River Street in Plains Township across the Susquehanna River to Rutter Avenue in Kingston was constructed in 1976 and opened in 1977.[47][50][51] The section of the North Cross Valley Expressway between Rutter Avenue in Kingston and PA 309 in Luzerne was constructed in 1980.[50][52][53] During construction of this section in 1979, a coal vein was discovered. In 1982, construction began to complete the bridge linking the terminus of the expressway at River Street to Conyngham Avenue.[50] By 1989, PA 309 was rerouted to follow Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard, Spring Street, Scott Street, Kidder Street, Conyngham Avenue, Wilkes-Barre Boulevard, and the North Cross Valley Expressway through the Wilkes-Barre area; the route replaced the PA 315 designation along Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard, Spring Street, and Scott Street and the PA 115 designation along Kidder Street.[49] The remaining section of the North Cross Valley Expressway from Wilkes-Barre Boulevard to I-81 was completed on November 9, 1991, with Governor Robert P. Casey in attendance for a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Construction of the highway cost $100 million.[50] Upon the completion of the final section of the North Cross Valley Expressway, PA 309 was rerouted to follow I-81 and the North Cross Valley Expressway through the Wilkes-Barre area, while PA 309 Bus. was designated onto the former alignment of PA 309 along Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard, Spring Street, and Scott Street and replaced PA 115 along Kidder Street between Scott Street and the interchange with the North Cross Valley Expressway.[54]

PA 309 northbound at southern terminus of the Fort Washington Expressway at the PA 152 exit in Cheltenham Township

PennDOT undertook a $375 million project to reconstruct and improve the section of PA 309 running along the Fort Washington Expressway between Cheltenham Avenue and PA 63 in Montgomery County.[55] The project rebuilt the roadway and shoulders, reconstructed bridges, improved ramps at interchanges, and constructed sound walls.[56] The interchanges with PA 152 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276) and Pennsylvania Avenue were completely reconstructed and reconfigured while a southbound exit and northbound entrance were added at the Norristown Road interchange.[55][57] As part of the reconstruction of the interchange between PA 309 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276) and Pennsylvania Avenue, Pennsylvania Avenue was extended as a two-way road between Fort Washington and Oreland, with traffic between the two communities no longer having to travel along PA 309 between the two sections of Pennsylvania Avenue.[58] The section of the highway between PA 73 and Highland Avenue was reconstructed between February 2004 and November 2006. The interchange between PA 309 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276) and Pennsylvania Avenue in Fort Washington was reconstructed between January 2005 and November 2008. The portion of the highway between Cheltenham Avenue and PA 73 was rebuilt between March 2005 and November 2008. The section of PA 309 between Highland Avenue and PA 63 was reconstructed between July 2007 and early 2011.[59] The new ramps at the Norristown Road interchange opened on December 20, 2010.[57] On November 11, 2019, work began on a project to improve the section of PA 309 along the Sellersville Bypass in Bucks County by rehabilitating pavement and reconstructing structures. Construction on this improvement project is expected to be completed in 2023.[60][61]

Major intersections[edit]

CountyLocationmi[1]kmExitDestinationsNotes
PhiladelphiaMontgomery
county line
PhiladelphiaCheltenham Township line0.0000.000 PA 611 (Old York Road)Interchange; southern terminus
MontgomeryCheltenham Township2.1433.449South end of freeway
2.3953.854 PA 152 north (Easton Road) – GlensideSouthern terminus of PA 152; access to Arcadia University and Mount Airy
Springfield Township4.3276.964Paper Mill Road – SpringfieldAccess to Chestnut Hill College
5.1878.348 PA 73 – Flourtown
Upper Dublin Township6.67710.746
I-276 Toll / Penna Turnpike – Fort Washington, Oreland, Harrisburg, New Jersey
I-276 / Penna Turnpike exit 339 (Fort Washington); E-ZPass or toll-by-plate on Penna Turnpike; access to Fort Washington and Oreland via Pennsylvania Avenue
7.73812.453Highland AvenueNorthbound exit, southbound entrance
8.69313.990Susquehanna RoadNorthbound exit, southbound entrance; access to Temple University Ambler
9.09014.629Butler Pike – AmblerSouthbound exit, northbound entrance
Lower Gwynedd Township10.16716.362Norristown Road – Spring HouseAccess to Gwynedd Mercy University
11.82919.037Bethlehem PikeSouthbound exit, northbound entrance
11.82919.037North end of freeway
Lower GwyneddHorsham
township line
12.25719.726 PA 63 (Welsh Road)
Montgomery Township14.21122.870 US 202 – Doylestown, NorristownInterchange
14.46023.271
US 202 Bus. south (Dekalb Pike) – Norristown
South end of US 202 Bus. overlap
15.33724.683 PA 463 (Cowpath Road / Horsham Road) – Lansdale, Hatboro

US 202 Bus. north (Doylestown Road) – Doylestown
North end of US 202 Bus. overlap
MontgomeryBucks
county line
HatfieldHilltown
township line
19.94332.095South end of freeway
19.94332.095Bethlehem Pike – SellersvilleNorthbound exit, southbound entrance
BucksHilltown Township21.52134.635 PA 113 – Souderton
West Rockhill Township23.41437.681 PA 152 south – Telford, SellersvilleNorthern terminus of PA 152; Sellersville signed northbound
25.38240.848 PA 563 – PerkasieAccess via Lawn Avenue
28.33845.606Sellersville, PerkasieSouthbound exit, northbound entrance; access via Bethlehem Pike
28.33845.606North end of freeway
Quakertown31.23450.266
PA 313 east / PA 663 south (West Broad Street) to Penna Turnpike NE Extension – Quakertown, Pennsburg
Western terminus of PA 313; northern terminus of PA 663
LehighUpper Saucon Township37.58360.484 PA 378 north – BethlehemSouthern terminus of PA 378
39.98664.351South end of freeway
40.52865.223 PA 145 north (South 4th Street)Northbound exit, southbound entrance; southern terminus of PA 145
40.95565.911 I-78 east – BethlehemSouth end of I-78 overlap; I-78 exit 60
41.13966.20759
To PA 145 – Summit Lawn
Southbound exit, northbound entrance; access via Rock Road
Allentown42.52768.44158Emaus Avenue southNorthbound exit
43.00569.21057Lehigh Street
Salisbury Township44.81472.12155 PA 29 south (Cedar Crest Boulevard)Northern terminus of southern segment of PA 29
Lower MacungieSouth Whitehall
township line
45.96673.97554 US 222 south / PA 222 north (Hamilton Boulevard)Signed as exits 54A (south) and 54B (north) northbound; northern terminus of US 222; southern terminus of PA 222; access to Reading and Dorney Park & Wildwater Kingdom
Lower Macungie Township46.59174.981 I-78 west – HarrisburgNorthbound exit, southbound entrance; north end of I-78 overlap; I-78 exit 53
South Whitehall Township47.53076.492Tilghman StreetFormer US 22; to I-476
48.27577.691 US 22 (Lehigh Valley Thruway) – Allentown, Bethlehem, HarrisburgBethlehem signed northbound; Allentown signed southbound; to I-78 west and I-476
48.36677.838North end of freeway
North Whitehall Township54.24487.297 PA 873 north (Main Street) – SlatingtonSouthern terminus of PA 873
Heidelberg Township59.03895.012 PA 100 south – FogelsvilleNorthern terminus of PA 100
Lynn Township61.61499.158 PA 143 south (Decatur Street) – New Tripoli, LenhartsvilleNorthern terminus of PA 143
SchuylkillWest Penn Township69.430111.737 PA 895 (Summer Valley Road / Lizard Creek Road) – New Ringgold, Bowmanstown
73.987119.071 PA 443 east (Blakeslee Boulevard) – Lehighton, Jim ThorpeSouth end of PA 443 overlap
74.975120.661 PA 443 west (Clamtown Road) – New Ringgold, OrwigsburgNorth end of PA 443 overlap
Tamaqua78.105125.698 US 209 (Broad Street) – Pottsville, Coaldale, Lansford
Rush Township80.141128.974 PA 54 (Mahanoy Avenue / Lafayette Street) – Mahanoy City, Jim Thorpe
Kline Township84.705136.319 I-81 – Hazleton, HarrisburgI-81 exit 138
Carbon
No major junctions
LuzerneHazle Township88.308142.118

PA 424 (Arthur Gardner Highway) to I-81 / PA 93 – Hazleton Commerce Center
Hazleton90.192145.150 PA 93 (West Broad Street)
91.148146.688 PA 924 south (West 15th Street)Northern terminus of PA 924
91.527147.298 PA 940 east (West 22nd Street) – Eckley, FreelandWestern terminus of PA 940
Butler Township98.111–
98.130
157.894–
157.925
I-80 – Bloomsburg, StroudsburgI-80 exit 262
Fairview Township107.993173.798 PA 437 south (Woodlawn Avenue) – Glen Summit, White HavenNorthern terminus of PA 437
Wilkes-Barre Township110.979178.603South end of freeway
110.979178.603
PA 309 Bus. north – Wilkes-Barre
Southern terminus of PA 309 Bus.
110.979178.603 I-81 south – Nanticoke, HazletonI-81 exit 165; south end of I-81 overlap
113.986183.443168Highland Park Boulevard – Wilkes-BarreAccess to Mohegan Sun Arena
115.962186.623 I-81 north – Scranton
PA 115 south – Bear Creek
North end of I-81 overlap; south end of North Cross Valley Expressway; I-81 exit 170; northern terminus of PA 115
Wilkes-Barre116.700187.8101
PA 315 north / PA 309 Bus. south – Dupont, Wilkes-Barre
Southern terminus of PA 315; northern terminus of PA 309 Bus.
117.904189.7482Wilkes-Barre Center CityAccess via North Wilkes-Barre Boulevard
Plains Township118.641190.9343Wilkes-Barre, PlainsAccess via South River Street; access to King's College and Wilkes University
Kingston119.450192.2364
To US 11 – Kingston, Forty Fort
Northbound exit, southbound entrance; access via Rutter Avenue
119.829192.8465 US 11 – Forty Fort, KingstonSouthbound exit, northbound entrance
Pringle120.484193.9006LuzerneNorthbound exit, southbound entrance; access via Union Street
Luzerne121.295195.2056LuzerneSouthbound exit, northbound entrance; access via Main Street
121.389195.357North end of freeway (north end of North Cross Valley Expressway)
Dallas125.816202.481
PA 415 north (Memorial Highway) to PA 118
Southern terminus of PA 415
WyomingMonroe Township134.043215.721 PA 29 – TunkhannockNorthern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Special routes[edit]

PA 309 Truck[edit]

Truck plate.svg

Pennsylvania Route 309 Truck marker

Pennsylvania Route 309 Truck

LocationQuakertown

Pennsylvania Route 309 Truck (PA 309 Truck) is a truck route that provides access from PA 212 to PA 309, bypassing the borough of Quakertown to the north. The truck route follows East Pumping Station Road, California Road, and West Pumping Station Road.[62]

PA 309 Business[edit]

Business plate.svg

Pennsylvania Route 309 Business marker

Pennsylvania Route 309 Business

LocationWilkes-Barre
Length4.649 mi[1] (7.482 km)

Pennsylvania Route 309 Business (PA 309 Bus.) is a 4.6-mile (7.4 km) business route of PA 309 that runs through the Wilkes-Barre area in Luzerne County. PA 309 Bus. begins at an interchange with I-81 and PA 309 in the borough of Ashley, heading northeast on four-lane divided Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard. Within this interchange, the business route crosses into Hanover Township before heading into Wilkes-Barre Township. The road runs past businesses and transitions into a three-lane road with a center left-turn lane, with I-81/PA 309 parallel a short distance to the southeast. At the Casey Avenue intersection, the roadway passes northwest of a park and ride lot. PA 309 Bus. runs through woodland and development before it narrows to two lanes and comes to an interchange with East Northampton Street northwest of the community of Georgetown. At this point, the business route becomes the border between the city of Wilkes-Barre to the northwest and Wilkes-Barre Township to the southeast, widening into a four-lane divided highway and running past businesses. The road becomes undivided and bends to the north, fully entering Wilkes-Barre and narrowing to two lanes. PA 309 Bus. turns into Spring Street and curves east, becoming lined with homes. The road heads northeast and widens to four lanes, running past commercial development. The business route becomes Scott Street before it turns east onto four-lane divided Kidder Street. The road runs past more businesses and briefly reenters Wilkes-Barre Township before heading back into Wilkes-Barre and passing to the north of the Wyoming Valley Mall. PA 309 Bus. comes to its northern terminus at an interchange with the PA 309 freeway, where the road continues northeast as PA 315.[12][63] PA 309 Bus. was designated in 1991 after PA 309 was realigned to run through the Wilkes-Barre area on I-81 and the North Cross Valley Expressway.[50][54] PA 309 Bus. replaced PA 309 along Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard, Spring Street, and Scott Street and PA 115 along Kidder Street.[49][54]

Major intersections
The entire route is in Luzerne County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Wilkes-Barre Township0.0000.000 I-81 / PA 309 north – Nanticoke, Hazleton, Scranton
PA 309 south – Mountain Top
I-81/PA 309 exit 165; southern terminus
1.8893.040Wilkes-Barre, Laurel RunInterchange; access via East Northampton Street
Wilkes-Barre4.6497.482

PA 309 to I-81 / PA 115 – Forty Fort, Dallas
PA 315 north – Dupont
PA 309 exit 1; northern terminus; southern terminus of PA 315
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Former US 309 Truck[edit]

Truck plate 1948.svg

U.S. Route 309 Truck marker

U.S. Route 309 Truck

LocationPhiladelphia

U.S. Route 309 Truck (US 309 Truck) was a truck bypass of the section of US 309 that ran along Lincoln Drive in Philadelphia. US 309 Truck began at US 1 Byp./US 13 Byp. (Hunting Park Avenue) and headed northwest on Germantown Avenue. The truck route ended at US 309, US 422, and US 611 Alt. at the intersection of Germantown Avenue, Mt. Airy Avenue, and Chew Avenue, at which point Germantown Avenue continued northwest as US 309/US 422. US 309 Truck was designated by 1950.[30] The truck route was decommissioned in the 1950s, being replaced with US 422 Alt. north of Washington Lane.[36]

Major intersections

The entire route was in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County.

mikmDestinationsNotes


US 1 Byp. / US 13 Byp. (Hunting Park Avenue)
Southern terminus
US 309 south (Allens Lane)
US 309 north / US 422 west (Germantown Avenue)
US 422 east (Chew Street)

US 611 Alt. north (Mt. Airy Avenue)
Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Former US 309 Bypass[edit]

By-pass plate 1948.svg

U.S. Route 309 Bypass marker

U.S. Route 309 Bypass

LocationAllentown

U.S. Route 309 Bypass (US 309 Byp.) was a bypass of a portion of US 309 in the northern part of the city of Allentown. The route began at US 22/US 309 (Tilghman Street), heading north of 12th Street briefly before turning northwest onto Roth Avenue.[30] US 309 Byp. ended at US 309 at the intersection of 19th Street and Main Boulevard. US 309 Byp. was designated by 1940.[27] The bypass route was decommissioned in the 1950s.[36]

Major intersections

The entire route was in Allentown, Lehigh County.

mikmDestinationsNotes
US 22 / US 309 (Tilghman Street)Southern terminus
US 309 (19th Street/Main Boulevard)Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Bureau of Maintenance and Operations (January 2015). Roadway Management System Straight Line Diagrams (Report) (2015 ed.). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e "U.S. Route 309 Will Become A State Highway This Month". Standard-Speaker. Hazleton, PA. February 5, 1968. Retrieved August 13, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Google (December 24, 2012). "overview of Pennsylvania Route 309" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved December 24, 2012.
  4. ^ Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  6. ^ Sokil, Dan (April 21, 2015). "Montgomery Township sells rights-of-way for Five Points widening project". North Penn Life. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c Bucks County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved January 10, 2016.
  8. ^ a b c Lehigh County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved January 23, 2016.
  9. ^ a b c d Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved November 11, 2015.
  10. ^ Schaffer, Scott (November 19, 2020). "Route 309: The long and winding Pennsylvania road". Scranton, PA: WNEP-TV. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  11. ^ Carbon County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved November 18, 2015.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Luzerne County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved November 11, 2015.
  13. ^ Wyoming County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved January 23, 2016.
  14. ^ "History of South Bethlehem". Bethlehem, PA Online. Retrieved May 16, 2007.
  15. ^ "Bethlehem Pike". Independence Hall Association of Philadelphia. Retrieved May 16, 2007.
  16. ^ Contosta, David R. (1992). Suburb in the City: Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, 1850-1990. Ohio State University Press. ISBN 0-8142-0580-1.
  17. ^ Pennsylvania Secretary of the commonwealth; Pennsylvania State Library; Pennsylvania General assembly; Pennsylvania Dept. of Public Instruction (1874). Pennsylvania Archives. Printed by J. Severns & co.
  18. ^ Keels, Thomas H.; Elizabeth Farmer Jarvis (2002). Chestnut Hill. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-1061-0.
  19. ^ Map of Pennsylvania Showing State Highways (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1911. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  20. ^ Pennsylvania Highway Map (eastern side) (Map). Gulf Oil. 1926. Retrieved December 26, 2007.
  21. ^ Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: United States Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 – via Wikimedia Commons.
  22. ^ Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1927. Retrieved December 26, 2007.
  23. ^ Map of Pennsylvania (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1928. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  24. ^ Pennsylvania Highway Map (Philadelphia Metro) (Map). Gulf Oil. 1928. Retrieved November 8, 2007.
  25. ^ a b c Tourist Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1930. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  26. ^ Tourist Map of Pennsylvania (back) (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1930. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  27. ^ a b Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (back) (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1940. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  28. ^ Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1940. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  29. ^ a b Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1950. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  30. ^ a b c Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (back) (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1950. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  31. ^ a b c Official Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1960. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  32. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000027369". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  33. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000027393". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  34. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000027364". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  35. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000027362". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  36. ^ a b c Official Map of Pennsylvania (back) (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1960. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  37. ^ Taylor, Ted (January 2, 2015). "At Large: A highway that didn't happen". Times Chronicle. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  38. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000023050". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  39. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000023158". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  40. ^ a b General Highway Map Lehigh County, Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1960. Retrieved December 17, 2020.
  41. ^ "Routes 222, 145 Hookup Approved PENNDOT Signs Along Hamilton Will Lead To 7th St. CROSSING". The Morning Call. Allentown, PA. July 10, 1991. Retrieved June 25, 2007.
  42. ^ U.S. Route Numbering Committee (June 19, 1962). "U.S. Route Numbering Committee Agenda Showing Action Taken by Executive Committee" (PDF) (Report). Washington, DC: American Association of State Highway Officials. p. 239. Retrieved October 28, 2020 – via Wikimedia Commons.
  43. ^ a b c d Official Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1970. Retrieved June 30, 2010.
  44. ^ "State Highway Traffic Route Changes Announced". Jim Thorpe Times-News. May 5, 1966. p. 1. Retrieved November 13, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  45. ^ U.S. Route Numbering Committee (June 19, 1963). "U.S. Route Numbering Committee Agenda" (PDF) (Report). Washington, DC: American Association of State Highway Officials. p. 254. Retrieved October 26, 2020 – via Wikimedia Commons.
  46. ^ U.S. Route Numbering Subcommittee (October 14, 1967). "U.S. Route Numbering Subcommittee Agenda Showing Action Taken by the Executive Committee" (Report). Washington, DC: American Association of State Highway Officials. p. 352. Retrieved August 13, 2015 – via Wikisource.
  47. ^ a b Pennsylvania Official Transportation Map (back) (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1980. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  48. ^ a b Pennsylvania Official Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1989. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  49. ^ a b c Pennsylvania Official Transportation Map (back) (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1989. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  50. ^ a b c d e f Lewis, Ed (August 23, 2020). "Look Back: North Cross Valley Expressway opened in 1991". Times Leader. Wilkes-Barre, PA. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  51. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000023880". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  52. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000023886". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  53. ^ General Highway Map Luzerne County Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1980. p. Sheet 1. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  54. ^ a b c General Highway Map Luzerne County Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1990. p. Sheet 1. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  55. ^ a b "Project Overview". 309 Online. Archived from the original on December 27, 2011. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  56. ^ Reed, Mary (March 3, 2009). "Huge Route 309 Project Nears Finish Line". Construction Equipment Guide. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  57. ^ a b "Ramps on 309 at Norristown Road to open Monday". Springfield Sun. December 18, 2010. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  58. ^ "Pennsylvania Avenue Being Extended In Two Directions Between Fort Washington And Oreland". 309 Online. Archived from the original on June 5, 2007. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  59. ^ "Project Time Line". 309 Online. Archived from the original on December 27, 2011. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  60. ^ "Project To Begin To Rehabilitate And Repair 9.1 Miles Of Route 309 (Sellersville Bypass)". TMA Bucks. October 25, 2019. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  61. ^ Shortell, Tom (September 20, 2019). "Road Warrior: Four years of construction coming to Route 309 in Bucks County". The Morning Call. Allentown, PA. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  62. ^ Google (May 3, 2016). "overview of Pennsylvania Route 309 Truck" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 3, 2016.
  63. ^ Google (January 23, 2016). "overview of Pennsylvania Route 309 Business" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 23, 2016.

External links[edit]

Route map:

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