Pennsylvania Route 68

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PA Route 68 marker

PA Route 68
Route information
Maintained by PennDOT
Length: 90.036 mi[1] (144.899 km)
Major junctions
West end: SR 39 near Glasgow
 

I-376 in Vanport
PA 51 in Bridgewater
PA 18 / PA 65 in Rochester
US 19 / PA 288 / PA 588 in Zelienople
I-79 near Harmony
PA 8 in Butler
US 422 near Butler

I-80 / PA 66 near Clarion
East end: US 322 in Clarion
Location
Counties: Beaver, Butler, Armstrong, Clarion
Highway system
PA 67 PA 69

Pennsylvania Route 68 (PA 68) is a 90.036-mile-long (144.899 km) east–west state highway located in western Pennsylvania in the United States. The western terminus of the route is at the Ohio state line west of Glasgow, where PA 68 continues into Ohio as State Route 39 (SR 39). The eastern terminus is at U.S. Route 322 (US 322) in Clarion. The route runs southwest-northeast across Beaver, Butler, Armstrong, and Clarion counties. PA 68 follows the Ohio River between the Ohio border and Beaver, where it crosses the Beaver River into Rochester and heads northeast away from the Ohio River. The route runs through rural areas to Butler County, where it intersects Interstate 79 (I-79) in Zelienople before serving Evans City and Butler. PA 68 passes through a section of Armstrong County before crossing the Allegheny River into Clarion County. Here, the route passes through Rimersburg and Sligo before it has an interchange with I-80 and continues to its terminus in Clarion.

PA 68 was originally designated in 1927 to run from the Ohio border northeast to Clarion before continuing to US 6/US 120 in Kane. The route was extended northwest to PA 59 in Kinzua in 1935. The full length of the route was paved by 1940. The northern terminus was again moved to Kane in 1961, with PA 321 replacing most of the route north of there and the former northern terminus inundated by the Allegheny Reservoir. The north end of PA 68 was cut back to its current location in 1970, with the road between Clarion and Kane becoming part of PA 66.

Route description[edit]

Beaver County[edit]

PA 68 begins at the Ohio border in Ohioville, Beaver County, where the road continues west into that state as SR 39. From the state line, the route heads east-northeast on two-lane undivided Midland Road, passing between wooded areas to the north and Norfolk Southern's Cleveland Line to the south with industrial areas and the Ohio River farther south. The road crosses the Little Beaver Creek into Glasgow and passes north of residential areas. PA 68 heads back into Ohioville and runs east through forested areas immediately to the north of the railroad tracks and the Ohio River. The road curves east-southeast and enters Midland, becoming Midland Avenue and passing homes. The route comes to an intersection with PA 168, where that route turns southeast to form a concurrency with PA 68, running through residential areas before heading through the commercial downtown of Midland. The road heads into industrial areas and becomes Midland Beaver Road, with PA 168 splitting to the south at an interchange to cross the Ohio River on the Shippingport Bridge.[2][3]

Past this, PA 68 continues northeast through more forests with the Norfolk Southern line and the river to the southeast. The road heads into residential areas with some industry, heading farther from the railroad line and the Ohio River. The route curves east past more homes, crossing over the Norfolk Southern line as it continues into more wooded areas. PA 68 turns northeast and runs between the railroad tracks to the northwest and the Ohio River to the southeast, crossing into Vanport Township and entering industrial areas as State Street. The road passes over the railroad tracks and runs past more commercial establishments before widening into a four-lane divided highway and coming to an interchange with I-376. After this interchange, the route becomes a two-lane undivided road again and continues through residential areas with some businesses. PA 68 becomes the border between Vanport Township to the north and Beaver to the south, where the name becomes 3rd Street. The road fully enters Beaver and runs through the commercial downtown. The route heads past homes before passing under a CSX railroad line and crossing into Bridgewater, where it reaches an interchange with PA 51. At this point, PA 68 heads east to form a concurrency with PA 51 on a four-lane divided highway, crossing the Beaver River into Rochester.[2][3]

Here, the road passes over Norfolk Southern's Fort Wayne Line and comes to an interchange with PA 65, at which point PA 51 heads east along with PA 65. Here, PA 68 splits from PA 51 and heads onto two-lane undivided Adams Street, coming to a traffic circle with PA 18, which heads south and cross the Ohio River on the Rochester–Monaca Bridge. The route continues through residential areas with some businesses. PA 68 turns northwest onto Virginia Avenue and passes more homes, becoming the border between Rochester to the west and Rochester Township to the east. The road fully enters Rochester Township and passes through North Rochester before turning northeast and becoming Sunflower Road. The route curves east and enters Daugherty Township, winding northeast through more rural areas of homes. PA 68 runs through more rural residential areas with some fields and woods, turning east before heading southeast into New Sewickley Township. The road reaches the community of Sunflower, turning northeast to run through more wooded areas with some farms and homes. The route passes through Unionville before passing under I-76 (Pennsylvania Turnpike) and intersecting the northern terminus of PA 989. PA 68 winds northeast through more farmland and woodland with some residences, crossing into Marion Township.[2][3]

Butler County[edit]

PA 68 enters Zelienople in Butler County and becomes West Beaver Street, heading into residential areas. The road curves east and reaches an intersection with US 19, where PA 68 turns north to join that route on South Main Street, passing through the commercial downtown. The road intersects the eastern terminus of PA 288, where it becomes North Main Street, before PA 68 splits from US 19 by heading east on East Grandview Avenue. The route runs past homes, crossing into Harmony and becoming Evans City Road. PA 68 heads through residential and commercial areas a short distance to the south of Connoquenessing Creek a Buffalo and Pittsburgh Railroad line, crossing into Jackson Township and becoming a four-lane divided highway as it comes to an interchange with access to and from the southbound direction of I-79. The road becomes two lanes and undivided again as it continues southeast into wooded areas with some development, passing through Eldenau and Harmony Junction. The route continues to the southwest of the railroad tracks and Breakneck Creek, reaching an intersection with PA 528. [2][4]

Here, PA 528 turns southeast to form a concurrency with PA 68. The road passes through woods before heading into Evans City, where it becomes West Main Street and runs past homes and businesses. The two routes curve to the east and cross the Buffalo and Pittsburgh Railroad line and the Breakneck Creek into the commercial downtown of Evans City, becoming East Main Street. PA 528 splits from PA 68 by turning north onto Franklin Street and PA 68 passes more residences, turning to the northeast. The road enters Forward Township and becomes Evans City Road again, running through farmland and woodland with some residential and commercial buildings. The route passes over Connoquenessing Creek and a Buffalo and Pittsburgh Railroad line, heading through woodland and turning north. PA 68 heads into farmland with some woods and residences, crossing into Connoquenessing, where it passes to the east of the residential center of town. The road heads into Connoquenessing Township and curves northeast, running through more agricultural and wooded areas with a few homes. The route passes through increasing areas of residential and commercial development, heading north of Butler Farm Show Airport before continuing into Butler Township. Here, PA 68 curves east and heads past more areas of housing, coming to an intersection with PA 356.[2][4]

Here, PA 68 heads southeast along with PA 356 on New Castle Road, a three-lane road with a center left-turn lane that runs through wooded areas and commercial development. The road enters Butler and becomes New Castle Street, running through residential areas with some businesses. PA 68/PA 356 heads east onto West Cunningham Street before splitting into a one-way pair, with eastbound PA 68/southbound PA 356 following West Cunningham Street and westbound PA 68/northbound PA 356 following West Jefferson Street. The two routes head into the commercial downtown of Butler, coming to an intersection with PA 8 at which point PA 356 splits from PA 68 by heading south along that route. The one-way pair carrying PA 68 becomes East Cunningham Street eastbound and East Jefferson Street westbound, with eastbound PA 68 turning north onto South McKean Street to rejoin westbound PA 68 on two-way East Jefferson Street. The road heads east through commercial areas with some homes, turning northeast into residential areas as it becomes the border between Butler to the northwest and Butler Township to the southeast. The route fully enters Butler Township again as it passes near Butler Memorial Hospital before coming to a bridge that carries the route over two Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad lines and Connoquenessing Creek, crossing into Summit Township. PA 68 comes to an interchange with the US 422 freeway, where it also intersects the southern terminus of PA 38; here, the road is a four-lane divided highway.[2][4]

St. Joseph's Church on Route 58, North Oakland

Past this, the road becomes two lanes and undivided, with the name becoming Chicora Road as it enters wooded areas with some homes. The route heads into a mix of farms and woods with some residences as it crosses into Oakland Township. PA 68 winds northeast through more wooded areas with some homes, passing through Woodbine. The road runs through more farmland and woodland with scattered residences, heading through North Oakland. The route crosses into Donegal Township and turns north, at which point it begins to run to the west of a Buffalo and Pittsburgh Railroad line. PA 68 curves northeast and east, heading into Chicora and crossing under the railroad tracks. The road curves northeast and becomes South Main Street, passing homes before becoming North Main Street in the center of town, where it passes a few businesses. After running past more residences, the route curves northeast and crosses into Fairview Township, becoming Chicora Road again and winding through agricultural and wooded areas with some homes. The road turns east and crosses PA 268 in Kepples Corners.[2][4]

Armstrong and Clarion counties[edit]

PA 68 in Rimersburg

PA 68 heads into Bradys Bend Township in Armstrong County and becomes an unnamed road, heading through forested areas with some homes, passing through Kaylor. The road turns east before a curve to the north, coming to the residential community of Brady's Bend. Past this, the route turns southeast through more forests.[2][5]

PA 68 crosses the Allegheny River into East Brady, Clarion County, becoming Bridge Street. The route turns southwest onto Kellys Way and passes homes with some businesses. PA 68 turns southeast onto 3rd Street and runs through residential areas before curving east as Simpson Road and heading through wooded areas. The road enters Brady Township and runs northeast through more woodland with some fields and homes. The route continues into Madison Township and runs through more rural areas, passing through New Athens and Maple Grove. PA 68 heads into Rimersburg and becomes Main Street, passing homes. The road intersects the western terminus of PA 861, where it becomes the border between Rimersburg to the west and Toby Township to the east before fully entering Toby Township and passing through Rimersburg Station.[2][6]

The route becomes unnamed as it passes through wooded areas with some farm fields and homes, heading to the north. PA 68 briefly heads through Piney Township before entering Sligo and passing homes on Colerain Street. The route intersects the eastern terminus of PA 58 and turns east onto Front Street, running past more residences. The road heads back into Piney Township and becomes unnamed, continuing through agricultural areas with some woods and homes, turning northeast into Monroe Township. The route runs through more farmland and woodland with some residences, turning north and heading through Reidsburg, where it crosses an abandoned railroad line and Piney Creek. PA 68 runs north through more rural areas before passing through Williamsburg and becoming a four-lane divided highway as it reaches an interchange with I-80/PA 66. Past this, the road heads through business areas before becoming undivided and heading into wooded areas with some homes in Clarion Township as South 5th Avenue. PA 68 enters Clarion and runs north-northeast past more residences before ending at US 322 in the commercial downtown.[2][6]

History[edit]

When Pennsylvania first legislated routes in 1911, what would become PA 68 was designated as Legislative Route 243 between the Ohio border and Rochester, Legislatve Route 78 between Rochester and Butler, Legislative Route 214 between Butler and Clarion, and Legislative Route 98 in a portion of Forest County.[7] PA 68 was designated in 1927 to run from the Ohio border in Beaver County northeast to US 6/US 119/US 120/PA 6/PA 7 in Kane, running along its current routing to Clarion before continuing to Kane. At this time, the entire route was paved between the Ohio border and Clarion except for a portion between Rimersburg and Sligo. Between Clarion and Kane, the entire route was unpaved except for a portion near Marienville and to the southwest of Kane.[8] A year later, the route between Rimersburg and Sligo was paved.[9] By 1930, PA 68 paved between US 322 northwest of Clarion and Paint Mills, Arthurs and Snydersburg, and around Leeper while the state highway was under construction between Paint Mills and Arthurs, Snydersburg and southwest of Leeper, and the Clarion/Forest county line and Roses.[10]

In the 1930s, the entire length of the route between Clarion and Kane was paved.[11] PA 68 was extended northwest from Kane along a paved road to PA 59 in Kinzua in 1935.[11][12] In 1961, the Pennsylvania Department of Highways approved moving the northern terminus of PA 68 to US 6 in Kane, with PA 321 replacing much of the route north of Kane. The former northern terminus at PA 59 in Kinzua was inundated with the creation of the Allegheny Reservoir.[13][14][15] In 1970, the north end of PA 68 was cut back to its current location at US 322 in Clarion, with the route between US 322 northwest of Clarion and US 6 in Kane replaced by a rerouted PA 66.[15] This change was made to keep truck traffic away from the Toby Bridge, which had a 15-ton weight limit and collapsed from an incident with a truck in 1969. Northbound trucks were instead directed to follow I-80 and PA 66 to avoid the bridge along the former PA 68 designation.[16]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Beaver Ohioville 0.000 0.000 SR 39 west (Harvey Avenue) – East Liverpool Ohio state line
Midland 2.975 4.788 PA 168 north (Beaver Road) Western end of PA 168 concurrency
Industry 4.840 7.789 PA 168 south (Shippingport Bridge) – Shippingport, Hookstown Interchange; eastern end of PA 168 concurrency
Vanport Township 11.617 18.696 I-376 (Beaver Valley Expressway) – Pittsburgh, New Castle Exit 38 (I-376)
Bridgewater 13.880 22.338 PA 51 north (Constitution Boulevard) – Chippewa Interchange; western end of PA 51 concurrency
Rochester 14.208 22.866 PA 51 south / PA 65 (Ohio River Boulevard) – Pittsburgh, New Brighton, Beaver Falls Interchange; eastern end of PA 51 concurrency
14.381 23.144 PA 18 (Brighton Avenue/Rhode Island Avenue) Traffic circle
New Sewickley Township 21.874 35.203 PA 989 south (Glen Eden Road) Northern terminus of PA 989
Butler Zelienople 26.777 43.093 US 19 south (Main Street) / Beaver Street – Pittsburgh Western end of US 19 concurrency
27.000 43.452 PA 288 west / PA 588 west (New Castle Street) – Ellwood City, Beaver Falls Eastern terminus of PA 288 / PA 588
27.095 43.605 US 19 north (Main Street) to I-79 north / Grandview Street – Portersville, Erie Western end of US 19 concurrency
Jackson Township 28.203–
28.220
45.388–
45.416
I-79 south – Pittsburgh Exit 87 (I-79); I-79 southbound entrance / northbound exit only
31.308 50.385 PA 528 south (Lindsay Road) Western end of PA 528 concurrency
Evans City 32.188 51.802 PA 528 north (Franklin Street) Western end of PA 528 concurrency
Butler Township 42.993 69.191 PA 356 north (New Castle Road) Western end of PA 356 concurrency
Butler 44.695 71.930 PA 8 / PA 356 south (Main Street) Eastern end of PA 356 concurrency
Summit Township 46.414–
46.500
74.696–
74.834
US 422 (Benjamin Franklin Highway) / PA 38 north (Oneida Valley Road) – Kittanning, New Castle, Eau Claire Interchange; southern terminus of PA 38
Fairview Township 58.890 94.774 PA 268 (Keeples Corner Road) – Parker, Kittanning
Armstrong
No major junctions
Clarion Rimersburg 74.423 119.772 PA 861 east – New Bethlehem Western terminus of PA 861
Sligo 79.094 127.289 PA 58 west (Bald Eagle Street) / Colerain Street – Parker Eastern terminus of PA 58
Monroe Township 87.885 141.437 I-80 / PA 66 – DuBois, Sharon Exit 62 (I-80)
Clarion 90.036 144.899 US 322 (Main Street) – Franklin, Brookville
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

KML is from Wikidata
  1. ^ a b Bureau of Maintenance and Operations (January 2015). Roadway Management System Straight Line Diagrams (Report) (2015 ed.). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Google (June 27, 2013). "Pennsylvania Route 68" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved June 27, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c Beaver County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Retrieved May 14, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d Butler County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Retrieved March 3, 2011. 
  5. ^ Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b Clarion County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Retrieved June 1, 2011. 
  7. ^ Map of Pennsylvania Showing State Highways (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1911. Retrieved January 1, 2014. 
  8. ^ Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1927. Retrieved December 26, 2007. 
  9. ^ Map of Pennsylvania (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1928. Retrieved May 7, 2015. 
  10. ^ Tourist Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1930. Retrieved June 24, 2010. 
  11. ^ a b Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1940. Retrieved June 24, 2010. 
  12. ^ "In A Paragraph". The Kane Republican. July 29, 1935. p. 7. Retrieved September 24, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  13. ^ "New Highway Rt. 321 Designation Approved". The Kane Republican. December 7, 1961. p. 1. Retrieved August 10, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  14. ^ General Highway Map McKean County, Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1967. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  15. ^ a b Official Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1970. Retrieved June 30, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Route 68 Near Clarion Eliminated". The Oil City Derrick. March 19, 1970. p. 15. Retrieved August 9, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read