Pennywhistle (Augie March song)

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"Pennywhistle"
Single by Augie March
from the album Watch Me Disappear
Released 27 September 2008 (2008-09-27)
Format
Genre Rock
Length 3:50
Songwriter(s) Glenn Richards
Augie March singles chronology
"The Cold Acre'"
(2006)
"Pennywhistle"
(2008)
"Watch Me Disappear"
(2008)
"The Cold Acre
(2006)
"Pennywhistle"
(2008)
"Watch Me Disappear"
(2008)

"Pennywhistle" is the second track on Watch Me Disappear, the fourth studio album by Australian rock band Augie March. The song, which was written by Glenn Richards, was released digitally on 16 September 2008, with the hard copy released in Australia on 27 September 2008.

It peaked at No. 37 on the ARIA Top 100 Physical Singles Chart.[1] Scott Podmore of The Herald Sun reviewed Watch Me Disappear and found that "Pennywhistle" was an "escape into the musical gaiety."[2]

Kathy McCabe of The Daily Telegraph felt that "the band are determined to make a star out of the instrument", the pennywhistle.[3] She reported that Richards was inspired to write the song by a Celtic whistle sample, while Edmondo Ammendola added "God forbid we change the pennywhistle for a recorder or a bassoon; there will be outrage."[3]

Music video[edit]

The music video was filmed along the shores of Avalon Beach, Victoria on 5 September 2008, directed by Ben Saunders. The first half of the video shows lead singer Richards riding a bicycle through a secluded waterfront neighbourhood whilst saluting the locals.

The band's drummer, David Williams, is cheerfully showing his skills on a pennywhistle whilst going alongside Richards for a few metres, only to then be pushed and chased by Richards until knocked to the ground. We see Williams on his knees, holding his lower stomach area in pain.

After placing his bicycle next to a shed, he appears with the rest of the band members, continuing down the road whilst simultaneously playing instruments.

Towards the end of the song, we see the locals dancing in unison to the music, walking off into the distance.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The ARIA Report" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 8 December 2008. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 December 2008. Retrieved 4 March 2016. 
  2. ^ Podmore, Scott (12 October 2008). "Watch Me Disappear". The Herald Sun. Archived from the original on 4 August 2009. Retrieved 4 March 2016. 
  3. ^ a b McCabe, Kathy (10 October 2008). "What Augie March don't like". The Daily Telegraph. News Corp Australia. Retrieved 4 March 2016.