People's Party (Iceland, 2016)

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People's Party

Flokkur Fólksins
FounderInga Sæland
Founded2016
IdeologySocialism[1]
Populism[2]
Disability rights[3]
Elderly interests[4]
Anti-poverty[5]
Anti-immigration[6]
Euroscepticism
Political positionBased on platform:
Fiscal: Left-wing
Social: Right-wing
Colours     Pink
Seats in the Althing
2 / 63
Election symbol
F
Website
flokkurfolksins.is

The People's Party (Icelandic: Flokkur fólksins) is an Icelandic party founded by the visually-impaired law graduate and X-Factor contestant Inga Sæland, with better conditions for the poor and disabled as their main issue.[2]

The party ran in the Icelandic parliamentary election 2016.[7] It received 3.5% of the votes and thus failed to pass the 5% threshold required to enter the legislature.

In the parliamentary election of 2017, the party received 6.88% of the votes and gained four seats in the Althing. At the end of November 2018, the party expelled two of its parlamentarians, Karl Gauti Hjaltason and Ólafur Ísleifsson,[8] after a meeting of these with members of the Centre Party where Karl Gauti and Ólafur didn't object to derogatory remarks of Centre Party members against the People's Party's leader, Inga Sæland.[9]

The party ran into controversy when Sæland made comments that were consider by the media as "xenophobic" and "anti-immigrant." Sæland has made efforts to distance herself from those comments, even calling for increased care for refugees.[2] The New York Times refers to the party as "railing against immigration, poverty and corruption".[10]

Electoral results[edit]

Parliament[edit]

Election Votes % Seats +/– Position Government
2016 6,707 3.54
0 / 63
Steady 0 Increase 8th Extra-parliamentary
2017 13,502 6.88
4 / 63
Increase 4 Increase 7th Opposition

References[edit]

  1. ^ Siguroardottir, Ragnhildur (24 October 2017). "A Guide to the Parties in Iceland's Nail-Biter Election". The New York Times. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "Flokkur Fólksins: The Populist Uprising? - The Reykjavik Grapevine". The Reykjavik Grapevine. 15 August 2017. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  3. ^ Siguroardottir, Ragnhildur (28 October 2017). "Iceland's Ruling Conservatives Emerge Weakened After Vote". Bloomberg Politics. Bloomberg. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  4. ^ Jelena Ćirić (27 October 2017). "Icelandic Parliamentary Election 2017: Party Overview". Iceland Review. Retrieved 11 July 2018.
  5. ^ Jelena Ćirić (27 October 2017). "Icelandic Parliamentary Election 2017: Party Overview". Iceland Review. Retrieved 11 July 2018.
  6. ^ Martyn-Hemphill, Richard (29 October 2017). "Iceland's Independence Party Retains Most Seats After Election". The New York Times. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  7. ^ Flokks fólksins
  8. ^ Kolbeinn Tumi Daðason, Sunna Kristín Hilmarsdóttir (November 30, 2018). "Karl Gauti og Ólafur reknir úr Flokki fólksins". visir.is (in Icelandic). Retrieved November 30, 2018.
  9. ^ Atli Ísleifsson (November 30, 2018). "Inga hefur ekkert heyrt í Ólafi eða Karli Gauta". visir.is (in Icelandic). Retrieved November 30, 2018.
  10. ^ Iceland’s Government Falls After Letter Asking to Pardon Pedophile

External links[edit]