Oxycodone/paracetamol

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"Percocet" and "Percs" redirect here. For the band, see Percocettes. For the supercomputer technology, see PERCS.
Oxycodone/paracetamol
Combination of
Oxycodone Opioid analgesic
Paracetamol Anilide analgesic
Clinical data
Trade names Depalgos
Endocet
Percocet
Ratio-Oxycocet
Roxicet
Tylox
AHFS/Drugs.com percocet
License data
Pregnancy
category
  • C
Routes of
administration
Oral
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number 330988-72-2 YesY
ChemSpider 4881971 YesY
  (verify)

The combination oxycodone/paracetamol (North American trade name Percocet, generic Endocet and Ratio-Oxycocet in Canada) is a combined opioid/non-opioid pain reliever used to treat moderate to severe acute (short-term) pain, marketed by Endo International plc, formerly Endo Pharmaceuticals.[1]

History[edit]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration first approved Percocet in 1976, under application ANDA 085106.[2]

Formulation[edit]

As of August 2014, Endo Pharmaceuticals produces Percocet in the following dosages.[3] Percocet tablets are available in four combinations of oxycodone hydrochloride with 325 mg of paracetamol / acetaminophen, each having different appearances and usual maximum daily doses:[3][4]

Oxycodone Hydrochloride (mg) Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) (mg) Tablet Color Tablet Shape
2.5 325 pink oval
5 325 blue round
7.5 325 peach oval
10.0 325 yellow oblong

Implicated in deaths[edit]

On June 30, 2009, an FDA advisory panel recommended that Percocet, Vicodin, and every other combination of acetaminophen with narcotic analgesics[5] be limited in their sales because of their contributions to an alleged 400 acetaminophen-related deaths in the United States each year, that were attributed to acetaminophen overdose and associated liver damage.[6]

In December 2009, the Canadian Medical Association Journal reported a study finding a fivefold increase in oxycodone-related deaths in Ontario (mostly accidental) between 1991 and 2007 that led to a doubling of all opioid-related Ontario deaths over the same period.[7][8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "PERCOCET® (Oxycodone and Acetaminophen Tablets, USP)" (PDF). Endo Pharmaceuticals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 July 2011. 
  2. ^ "Drugs@FDA. FDA approved drug products (searchable database)". U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Retrieved 2009-03-30. 
  3. ^ a b "Percocet oxycodone and acetaminophen tablets USP" (PDF). Endo Pharmaceuticals. May 2011. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  4. ^ "PERCOCET- oxycodone hydrochloride and acetaminophen tablet". Endo Pharmaceuticals. August 2014. 
  5. ^ "FDA May Restrict Acetaminophen". WebMD. 
  6. ^ Harris, Gardiner (2009-07-01). "Ban Is Advised on 2 Top Pills for Pain Relief". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-22. 
  7. ^ Irfan A. Dhalla, Muhammad M. Mamdani, Marco L.A. Sivilotti, Alex Kopp, Omar Qureshi, David N. Juurlink. Prescribing of opioid analgesics and related mortality before and after the introduction of long-acting oxycodone. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2009; 181 (12): 891 DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.090784
  8. ^ Benedikt Fischer, Jürgen Rehm. Deaths related to the use of prescription opioids. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2009; Fischer, B.; Rehm, J. (2009). "Deaths related to the use of prescription opioids". Canadian Medical Association Journal. 181 (12): 881–882. doi:10.1503/cmaj.091791. PMC 2789122free to read. PMID 19969577. 
  9. ^ "Deaths from opioid use have doubled; five-fold increase in oxycodone deaths". Canadian Medical Association Journal. ScienceDaily. December 7, 2009. Retrieved May 31, 2012. 

External links[edit]