Percy Anderson (judge)

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Percy Anderson
Percy Anderson District Judge.jpg
Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
Assumed office
May 1, 2002
Appointed by George W. Bush
Preceded by Kim McLane Wardlaw
Personal details
Born Percy Anderson
(1948-07-31) July 31, 1948 (age 68)
Long Beach, California
Education University of California, Los Angeles A.B.
UCLA School of Law J.D.

Percy Anderson (born July 31, 1948) is a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California.

Early life and education[edit]

Anderson was born on July 31, 1948,[1] in Long Beach, California, and received an Artium Baccalaureus degree from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1970, followed by a Juris Doctor from UCLA School of Law in 1975.

Career[edit]

Anderson was a directing attorney for San Fernando Valley Neighborhood Legal Services, Inc., from 1975 to 1978, and was a lecturer at UCLA in 1977 and 1978. From 1979 to 1985, he was an Assistant United States Attorney for the Central District of California. From 1985 to 1996, Anderson was a partner at Bryan Cave.[2]

Until his appointment to the District Court, Anderson worked at Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal.[2]

Judicial service[edit]

Anderson was nominated by President George W. Bush on January 23, 2002, to a seat on the United States District Court for the Central District of California vacated by Kim McLane Wardlaw. Anderson was confirmed by the United States Senate on April 25, 2002, and received his commission on May 1, 2002.

Controversy[edit]

In 2006, Anderson was removed from a wrongful conviction lawsuit case by the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.[3] Lawyers for the plaintiff, a man who had spent twelve years in prison on a rape conviction but was later cleared by DNA evidence, had complained that Anderson was biased against the plaintiff.[3] On the day Anderson declared a mistrial (due to a deadlocked jury), a three judge panel from the Ninth Circuit ruled that due to Anderson's actions during the case his "impartiality might be questioned" and that the case should be expediently retried before another judge.[3]

In 2008, the Ninth Circuit overturned a trial Anderson presided over, ruling that Anderson should have disqualified himself due to his stock holdings in a corporation alleged to be a part of fraudulent business activities in the case.[4]

In a 2011 Los Angeles Times article,[5] Anderson was criticized for extensive delays in reviewing writs of habeas corpus. In particular, Anderson is alleged to refuse to rule upon writs in which junior judicial officials have found merit to a finding in favor of prisoner release; three cases have "languished unattended" in "years-long inaction"—these three cases waiting five years or more for rulings from Anderson.[5] Legal experts have said that the delays are "highly unusual" and critics have asserted that Anderson's handling of these cases is concerning and may warrant a misconduct inquiry.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ According to the State of California. California Birth Index, 1905-1995. Center for Health Statistics, California Department of Health Services, Sacramento, California.
  2. ^ a b "Senate Confirms Two Federal Judge Nominees for Central District of California", press release, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, May 17, 2002
  3. ^ a b c "Panel Takes Judge Off Federal Case", Henry Weinstein, Los Angeles Times, September 14, 2006
  4. ^ "Homestore CEO's fraud conviction overturned", Bob Egelko, San Francisco Chronicle, January 15, 2008
  5. ^ a b c "Relief delayed for prisoners deemed wrongfully convicted", Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times, August 21, 2011

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Kim McLane Wardlaw
Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
2002–present
Incumbent