Percy Jones (boxer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Percy Jones
Statistics
Weight(s) Flyweight
Nationality British
Born (1892-12-26)26 December 1892
Porth, Wales
Died 25 December 1922(1922-12-25) (aged 29)
Boxing record
Total fights 56[1]
Wins 50
Wins by KO 31
Losses 3
Draws 3

Percy Jones (26 December 1892 – 25 December 1922) was a Welsh boxer, the first Welshman to win a world boxing title when he took the World Flyweight Championship from Bill Ladbury in 1914. Jones also took the British and European Flyweight Championships from Ladbury in the same match.

He has been voted number 6 in a BBC poll of Welsh boxing greats[2]

History[edit]

Born in Porth and raised in a coal mining family, Jones made his name at a local level, fighting in boxing booths.[3][4] He was a successful amateur winning the amateur bantamweight title in three consecutive years.[5]

His first significant professional fight was a win (via disqualification) over Joe Symonds in March 1913. He beat Symonds twice more later that year, and in November stopped Sam Kellar in the fifteenth round in a final eliminator for the vacant British flyweight title. This led to a challenge in January 1914 for Bill Ladbury's title, Jones winning on points to be recognised as champion of Britain, Europe, and the World.[3][6]

He lost to Eugene Criqui in his next (non-title) fight, but beat the Frenchman on points in April in a defence of his European title.[3][7] In his next non-title bout, he was knocked out Symonds in the eighteenth round of twenty.[8]

He was forced to relinquish the British and World titles after failing to make the weight in two title fights.[4] He lost to Tancy Lee in October 1914 in what should have been a British title fight, prompting a move up to bantamweight.[9][10]

His last professional contest was a fifth-round KO of Ladbury in October 1915, although he competed in an army contest the following year.

World War I interrupted his boxing career with Jones enlisting in the Glamorgan Bantam Battalion of the Welsh Army Service Corps on 2 January 1915.[10] He was serving as a sergeant at the Somme in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers when he was badly wounded in the leg in 1916.[3] After almost 30 operations to save the leg it was eventually amputated in 1918.[3][4] Jones was also badly affected by poison gas.[3]

His weight dropped to a little over 4 stone, and he died of trench fever in 1922 on Christmas Day, one day short of his 30th birthday.[3][4]

Fight record[edit]

Jones is recorded on Boxrec.com as having 56 professional fights, with 50 wins, 3 losses and 3 draws.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ per Boxrec.com
  2. ^ "Wales' pugilist princes". BBC News. 7 March 2006. Retrieved 8 August 2008. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Haines, Chris (2008) "Boxing: Percy Jones was a real knockout", Wales Online, 10 July 2008. Retrieved 24 December 2017
  4. ^ a b c d Prior, Neil (2014) "Percy Jones' 1914 title began century of Wales' boxing wins", BBC, 25 January 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2017
  5. ^ "Percy Jones Recovery". Sporting Life. 21 January 1903. Retrieved 24 December 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)). 
  6. ^ "Boxing: Fly-Weight Championship: Percy Jones Defeats Bill Ladbury On Points". Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer. 27 January 1914. Retrieved 24 December 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)). 
  7. ^ "Fly-Weight Boxing: Percy Jones Defeats Criqui". Pall Mall Gazette. 27 March 1914. Retrieved 24 December 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)). 
  8. ^ "Percy Jones Surprised". Birmingham Daily Gazette. 18 May 1914. Retrieved 24 December 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)). 
  9. ^ "N.S.C. Opening: Percy Jones and Tancy Lee for Fly-Weight Belt". Birmingham Daily Gazette. 17 October 1914. Retrieved 24 December 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)). 
  10. ^ a b "Percy Jones Joins: Another Famous Boxer Leads the Way". Western Mail. 4 January 1915. Retrieved 24 December 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)). 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]