Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) Education is a school curriculum subject in England and Ireland (known as SPHE-Social, Physical and Health Education) which focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and attributes to keep children and young people healthy and safe and to prepare them for life and work.[1] PSHE education is defined by the schools inspectorate Ofsted as a planned programme to help children and young people develop fully as individuals and as members of families and social and economic communities. Its goal is to equip young people with the knowledge, understanding, attitudes and practical skills to live healthily, safely, productively and responsibly.[2]

The Department for Education (DfE) state that "all schools should make provision for PSHE, drawing on good practice"[3] and that PSHE education is "an important and necessary part of all pupils' education".[4]

PSHE learning is shown to not only support pupils' health, relationships and wellbeing [5] but also their academic attainment.[6] A Department for Education (DfE) review of PSHE education provision found a range of positive outcomes, including improved attitudes to health, being able to deal with personal difficulties and improved behaviour.[7]

In Wales, the comparable element of the state school curriculum topic is Personal and Social Education (PSE). In Ireland, it is Social, Personal and Health education (SPHE). It is also known as PSHEE (Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education), PSED (Personal, Social and Emotional Development) and PSHCE (Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education).

PSHE themes and topics[edit]

The PSHE education programme of study is organised into three core themes:[8]

  1. health and wellbeing
  2. relationships
  3. living in the wider world (covering economic wellbeing and careers)

These themes include various topics related to physical and mental health, alcohol and drug education, relationships (and sex) education, economic wellbeing and careers.

Status on the curriculum and recent developments[edit]

PSHE education has been a non-statutory (and therefore non-compulsory) curriculum subject. However, as Ofsted stated in its 2013 PSHE report "the great majority of schools choose to teach it because it makes a major contribution to their statutory responsibilities to promote children and young people's personal and economic wellbeing; offer sex and relationships education; prepare pupils for adult life and provide a broad and balanced curriculum".[7]

There have however been concerns raised about the consistency of provision due to this non-statutory status. The aforementioned 2013 Ofsted PSHE report found that 40% of schools’ PSHE education was "not yet good enough". There has also been more of an expectation on independent schools to provide PSHE education than maintained schools and academies up to now due to greater emphasis on PSHE in the Independent Schools Standards.[9]

Concerns over consistency and quality and provision prompted a national campaign to raise the status of PSHE education in all schools. This was supported by over 100 organisations (including the NSPCC, British Heart Foundation, Teenage Cancer Trust and Barnardo's), 85% of business leaders, 88% of teachers, 92% of parents and 92% of young people.[10]

In 2017 the government committed to introducing compulsory relationships and sex education (RSE) in all secondary schools, and compulsory 'relationships education' in all primary schools.[11] An additional commitment to the health education (mental and physical) aspect of PSHE education was announced in July 2018.[12] The majority of PSHE education will therefore be compulsory in all schools from September 2020. Though not yet compulsory, schools are still expected to cover the economic wellbeing (and careers) of PSHE education. [13][14]

The PSHE Association and the Sex Education Forum jointly published a Roadmap to Statutory RSE education.[15] in November 2018 to support schools in preparing their relationships and sex education for statutory changes.[15] In February 2019, the Department of Education enacted a statutory guidance policy which will assist schools in England with PSHE when it becomes compulsory in 2020.[16][17]

A measure to make PSHE compulsory in primary and secondary schools in England received approval from the House of Lords in April 2019.[18] The Department for Education (DfE) published final statutory guidance for teaching Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education in June 2019.[19] The consultation closed in November 2018. This guidance will replace existing government "Sex and Relationship Education Guidance", which were last updated in 2000.[20] The guidelines, which were also published by the House of Commons,[21] requires, among other things, acknowledgement of England's laws concerning gay rights, including the legalization of same-sex marriage, and the protection of the "physical and mental wellbeing" of gay children.[22][21]

Despite not being mandatory until September 2020, schools in England will be encouraged to enact the new PSHE cirriculum starting in September 2019.[19]

National body for PSHE education[edit]

The PSHE Association is the national body for PSHE education in England, providing advice and support to a network of over 25,000 teachers and other professionals working in schools nationwide. The Association is an independent charity and membership association, established as the official national PSHE subject association by the Department for Education in 2007.

Publications[edit]

There are many independent publications supporting the teaching of PSHE education in schools in the UK:

  • Programme of Study for PSHE Education (Key stages 1–5), by the PSHE Association
  • A curriculum for life: the case for statutory PSHE education, by the PSHE Association
  • Key principles for statutory PSHE, by the PSHE Association
  • Understanding Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education in Primary Schools by Nick Boddington, Adrian King, Jenny McWhirter
  • Understanding Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education in Secondary Schools by Jenny McWhirter, Nick Boddington, Jenny Barksfield
  • Jigsaw PSHE Scheme of Work by Jan Lever and Clare Williams
  • Circles, PSHE and Citizenship in Secondary Schools by Marilyn Tew, Hilary Potter and Mary Read
  • PSHE and Citizenship by Hilary Mason
  • The PSHE Co-Ordinator's Handbook by Colin Noble, Graham Hofmann
  • Dimensions Creative Curriculum PSHE schemes of work Nursery EYFS, KS1, KS2 by Elaine Sutton

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions | PSHE Association". www.pshe-association.org.uk. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  2. ^ Ofsted (2010) Personal, social, health and economic education in schools [1] Archived 4 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ "Personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE)". GOV.UK. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  4. ^ "Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education". GOV.UK. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  5. ^ "A curriculum for life: the case for statutory PSHE education". PSHE Association. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  6. ^ "The economic case for PSHE in schools". Pro Bono Economics. 23 October 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) Education: A mapping study of the prevalent models of delivery and their effectiveness" (PDF). assets.publishing.service.gov.uk. 23 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2018.
  8. ^ "Updated Programme of Study for PSHE Education (key stages 1-5". PSHE Association. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  9. ^ "EDUCATION, ENGLAND The Education (Independent School Standards) Regulations 2014" (PDF). legislation.gov.uk. 23 January 2019. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  10. ^ "Campaigns". PSHE Association. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  11. ^ "Sex and Relationships Education:Written statement - HCWS509". UK Parliament. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  12. ^ "Government takes 'major step' towards better PSHE for all". PSHE Association. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  13. ^ "Curriculum guidance". PSHE Association. Retrieved 23 July 2019.
  14. ^ "Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education" (PDF). UK Department of Education (Draft). February 2019. Retrieved 23 July 2019.
  15. ^ a b "Roadmap to statutory relationships and sex education published". NAHT. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  16. ^ "Curriculum guidance". PSHE Association. February 2019. Retrieved 23 July 2019.
  17. ^ "Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education" (PDF). UK Department of Education (Draft). February 2019. Retrieved 23 July 2019.
  18. ^ "Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Health Education (England) Regulations 2019 - Hansard". hansard.parliament.uk.
  19. ^ a b "Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education". UK Department of Education. 25 June 2019. Retrieved 23 July 2019.
  20. ^ "Sex and Relationship Education Guidance" (PDF). National Archives. July 2000. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 April 2013. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  21. ^ a b Long, Robert (11 July 2019). "Relationships and Sex Education in Schools (England)" – via researchbriefings.parliament.uk. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  22. ^ https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/805781/Relationships_Education__Relationships_and_Sex_Education__RSE__and_Health_Education.pdf

External links[edit]