Personal shopper

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A personal shopper is a person who helps others shop by giving advice and making suggestions. They are often employed by department stores and boutiques, although some are freelance or work exclusively online. Their focus is usually on clothes, although the number of non-clothing stores – such as furniture retailers – that offer personal shopping services is on the rise.

There are no formal educational requirements to become a personal shopper, though most outlets recommend related retail experience.[1]

Overview[edit]

A personal shopper is typically employed by the store itself, which means that payment for the service is not required.[2] Other stores will charge a small fee to use their personal shoppers and the amenities that come along with the service. Personal shoppers can also be known as fashion stylists, shop assistants, or sales assistants.

Some personal shoppers operate without affiliation on a freelance basis, including private client event styling and closet organizing. Outside of agencies, personal shoppers can be found on auction websites such as eBay where they auction their services to obtain customized items such as men and women's clothing collections.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harris McBride, Laura; Gallanis, Peter J.; Goulet, Tag (July 2005), The FabJob Guide to Becoming a Personal Shopper, Alberta: FabJob Inc., p. 216, ISBN 978-1894638555
  2. ^ Clinton, Leah Melby. "Why You Should Try a Personal Shopper (and Stores You Never Knew Had One!)". Glamour. Retrieved 2017-03-20.
  3. ^ Conway, Susannah. "Get yourself a personal shopper on the high street". Mail Online. Associated Newspapers Ltd. Retrieved 7 January 2013.