Pet psychic

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A pet psychic, or animal communicator is a person who claims to communicate psychically with animals.[1][2] Some pet psychics claim to communicate with long-dead animals,[1] while others can be characterized as animal communicators or animal psychologists.[3][4]

The term psychic refers to an alleged ability to perceive information hidden from the normal senses through what is described as extrasensory perception. Skeptics of extrasensory perception attribute such putative powers to intentional trickery or self-delusion.[5][6][7][8]

Techniques[edit]

Pet psychics rely on different techniques when doing an animal reading. These psychics allegedly communicate with animals and connect with an animal's soul. Some claim the readings are done by communicating with their "electromagnetic energy" similar to reiki and/or therapeutic touch healing.[9] Others claim the animal does not need to be alive or physically close to the psychic as noted with phone readings.[1][3] Tarot cards recently have been designed specifically for pet readings by their owners.[10]

A pet psychic is different from a pet whisperer like Cesar Millan or Monty Roberts who use body language and an understanding of animal psychology to communicate with the animal. In the early twentieth century, the Association for Research and Enlightenment began researching paranormal and psychic abilities in humans.[4] The first animal communicators claimed they could communicate telepathically with animals living or dead.[1][4][9]

The number of businesses offering pet psychic services has steadily increased, but the industry remains unregulated and scientifically unverified.[2] The services offered include advice and counsel to clients.

Criticism of pet psychics[edit]

Skeptical investigator Joe Nickell has written that cold reading can explain why so many pet psychics appear to communicate with animals. Pet psychics like Gerri Leigh and Animal Planet's Sonya Fitzpatrick work in front of audiences with the pets and owners present at the same time. Although appearing to be impressive, the conclusions and pronouncements are "validated" by the pet owners and not the pets themselves.[11] Furthermore, linguistic professor Karen Stollznow tested a pet psychic with a cat named Jed. Not only was the psychic "completely inaccurate in her reading of Jed's age, place of birth, background, behavior, health, and my health ...", she was unable to tell that Jed was not her cat. Stollznow concluded that "language is human-species specific. We don't and can't 'know' what animals think."[12]

Skeptic Robert Todd Carroll has described the claims of pet psychics as quackery. According to Carroll "the king of the animal quackers has to be Rupert Sheldrake, who thinks he's proved that some pets are psychic."[9]

In the media[edit]

The Pet Psychic with Sonya Fitzpatrick has been the most well-known television show that portrays this topic. She now has a radio program called Animal Intuition on the Sirius Satellite Radio service. The hosts of the Oh No, Ross and Carrie! podcast investigated the efficacy of pet psychics.[13]

Hilary Renaissance is a pet psychic who specializes in helping people locate their missing and stolen pets.[14] Her telepathic abilities were put to the test by skeptical television news reporter John Sharify of ABC TV's Seattle KOMO 4 Evening News in a news segment titled "Meet the Amazing Pet Psychic"[15][16][14] The news report features a testimonial from a Mississippi police chief about how information provided by Hilary led to the recovery of a stolen dog. A lady in Redmond, Washington testified that she found her missing cat with Hilary's assistance. In another television news report, WRCB TV investigative reporter Jonquil Newland credited Pet Psychic Hilary Renaissance for helping a Tennessee family reunite with their missing dog.[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Roeper, R (2008). Debunked!: Conspiracy Theories, Urban Legends, and Evil Plots of the 21st Century. Chicago Review Press. p. 152. ISBN 978-1-55652-707-4. 
  2. ^ a b Italie, L (2008) What's on your cat's mind? Ask a pet whisperer: Animal communicators boast of a special bond, but claims can't be verified Associated Press.
  3. ^ a b McGillivray, D; E Adamson (2004). The Complete Idiot's Guide to Pet Psychic Communication. Alpha Books. p. Back cover. ISBN 978-1-59257-214-4. 
  4. ^ a b c Orey, C (2003). 202 Pets' Peeves: Cats and Dogs Speak Out on Pesky Human Behavior. Citadel. ISBN 0806524421. 
  5. ^ Gracely, EJ. (1998) Why Extraordinary Claims Demand Extraordinary Proof Quackwatch.com
  6. ^ New York Daily News. (2007) She Told Them Boy Was Dead. Crystal Ball Fails Psychic in MO. Kidnap
  7. ^ Waxman, S. (2002) Shooting Crap Salon.com
  8. ^ Alcock, James. (2003). Give the Null Hypothesis a Chance: Reasons to Remain Doubtful about the Existence of Psi. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10: 29–50.
  9. ^ a b c Carroll, R (2011). The Skeptic's Dictionary: A Collection of Strange Beliefs, Amusing Deceptions, and Dangerous Delusions. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-471-27242-7. 
  10. ^ Clausing, J. (2013) Dog Psychics Transform The Way You Communicate With Your Pet Huffington Post.
  11. ^ Nickell, J. (2002) Psychic Pets and Pet Psychics. Investigative Files. 26.6.
  12. ^ Stollznow, K. (2003) The Ballad of Jed (and the Pet Psychic).Skeptical Inquirer. 19.1.
  13. ^ Blocher, R, Poppy, C. (2012) Ross and Carrie Pet the Psychic: The Case of the Transgendered Dog. Oh No, Ross and Carrie!.
  14. ^ a b Renaissance, Hilary. "Pet Psychic". www.calmpet.com. Hilary Renaissance. 
  15. ^ "Meet the Amazing Pet Psychic". 
  16. ^ "Meet the Amazing Pet Psychic". 
  17. ^ Newland, Jonquil (2011). "Pet Psychic Helps Family Find Missing Dog". www.wrcbtv.com. www.wrcbtv.com. 

External links[edit]