Pete Beathard

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Pete Beathard
No. 10, 11, 12
Position: Quarterback
Personal information
Date of birth: (1942-03-07) March 7, 1942 (age 73)
Place of birth: Hermosa Beach, California
Height: 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight: 200 lb (91 kg)
Career information
High school: El Segundo (CA)
College: Southern California
NFL draft: 1964 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5
AFL draft: 1964 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Peter Falconer Beathard (born March 7, 1942) is a former American football quarterback who played professionally in the American Football League (AFL), the National Football League (NFL), and the World Football League (WFL). He is the younger brother of former NFL executive Bobby Beathard (b. 1937).[1]

College career[edit]

Born and raised in southern California, Beathard graduated from El Segundo High School in 1960 and played college football in Los Angeles at USC. As a junior, he led the Trojans to the national championship in 1962. Both he and Ron Vander Kelen, the Wisconsin quarterback were named the Players Of The Game in the 1963 Rose Bowl, which USC won, 42–37.[2]

Professional career[edit]

Beathard was the fifth overall selection in 1964 NFL draft (Detroit Lions) and the second overall pick in the AFL draft by the Kansas City Chiefs,[3] where he signed and backed up Len Dawson.[4] In October 1967, Beathard was traded during his fourth season to the Houston Oilers in exchange for defensive tackle Ernie Ladd and quarterback Jacky Lee.[5] He led the Oilers to the Eastern division title, but lost 40–7 to the Oakland Raiders in the AFL championship game. Beathard's playing time in 1968 was curtailed due to appendicitis,[6] and in 1969 he took the Oilers to the four-team AFL playoffs.

Beathard was traded to the Cardinals in 1970,[7] the Rams in August 1972,[8] and returned to the Chiefs in 1973.[9] Waived by the Chiefs in September 1974, he finished his pro career in the short-lived World Football League (WFL), with the Portland Storm in 1974,[10][11] and the Chicago Winds in 1975.[12] He was briefly on the roster of the Oakland Raiders in October 1975.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zimmerman, Paul (August 29, 1988). "Smartest man in the NFL". Sports Illustrated. p. 58. 
  2. ^ 2008 Rose Bowl Program, 2008 Rose Bowl. Accessed January 26, 2008.
  3. ^ "Lions lose Beathard to Chiefs". Owosso Argus-Press (Michigan). Associated Press. December 4, 1963. p. 16. 
  4. ^ Moore, Bob (June 18, 2015). "Chapter Two: Pete Beathard is an Early Prize". Kansas City Chiefs. (team history). Retrieved February 9, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Beathard is traded by KC for Ladd, Lee". Lodi News-Sentinel (California). UPI. October 9, 1967. p. 11. 
  6. ^ "Beathard: surgery". St. Petersburg Independent (Florida). Associated Press. October 4, 1968. p. 2C. 
  7. ^ "Houston trades Beathard". Victoria Advocate (Texas). Associated Press. January 22, 1970. p. 1B. 
  8. ^ "Rams get Pete Beathard". Lakeland Ledger (Florida). Associated Press. August 20, 1972. p. 5B. 
  9. ^ "Beathard will start for Chiefs tonight". Schenectady Gazette (New York). Associated Press. August 13, 1973. p. 26. 
  10. ^ "Storm signs Beathard to WFL pact". Eugene Register-Guard (Oregon). UPI. September 11, 1974. p. 1B. 
  11. ^ Cawood, Neil (September 26, 1974). "Beathard stirs up the Storm". Eugene Register-Guard (Oregon). p. 1B. 
  12. ^ "Hornets seek 1st victory". Spartanburg Herald (South Carolina). July 19, 1975. p. A6. 
  13. ^ "Beathard to Raiders". Lodi News-Sentinel (California). UPI. October 9, 1975. p. 10. 

External links[edit]