Peter Baldwin (director)

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Peter Baldwin
Born(1931-01-11)January 11, 1931
DiedNovember 19, 2017(2017-11-19) (aged 86)
OccupationActor, director
Years active1952–2002

Peter Baldwin (January 11, 1931 – November 19, 2017) was an American actor and director of film and television.[1]

Baldwin started his career as an actor, employed as a contract player at Paramount Studios. He played Johnson in the film Stalag 17 and Lieutenant Walker in Little Boy Lost, both made in 1953. In 1962 he played the role of murderer Tony Benson in the Perry Mason episode, "The Case of the Melancholy Marksman", and appeared in the 1970 Italian thriller The Weekend Murders.

Baldwin eventually became a television director with an extensive résumé. As well as directing many of the episodes of ABC's hit situation comedy The Brady Bunch, he also directed episodes of other ABC hit sitcoms, The Partridge Family, from 1970 to 1971 and Benson, from 1979 to 1980. He was among the directors of episodes of the 1973 NBC sitcom Needles and Pins and of the 1985-1986 CBS sitcom Foley Square, and also helped direct a few episodes of Family Ties in 1987. He won an Emmy in 1988 for the television series The Wonder Years. His last directing credit was an episode of the Disney Channel sitcom Even Stevens in 2002.[2]

In the 1980s, Baldwin directed the short-lived comebacks of Mary Tyler Moore in Mary in 1985 and Lucille Ball in Life with Lucy in 1986. Both lasted 13 episodes.

Baldwin lived with his wife in Pebble Beach, California where he died on November 19, 2017, at age 86.[3]

Filmography[edit]

Director[edit]

Actor[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Peter Baldwin". Hollywood.com. Archived from the original on 2016-08-06. Retrieved 2016-07-28.
  2. ^ Nakamura, Reid (November 24, 2017). "Peter Baldwin, Emmy-Winning 'The Wonder Years' Director, Dies at 86". The Wrap. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  3. ^ Barnes, Mike (November 24, 2017). "Peter Baldwin, Actor and Emmy-Winning TV Director, Dies at 86". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved February 23, 2019.

External links[edit]