Peter Barker

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For the Australian footballer, see Peter Barker (footballer). For the British Virgin Islands sailor, see Peter Barker (sailor).
Peter Barker
Barker Australian Open 2011 (cropped).jpg
Barker during the 2011 Australian Open quarter-final match against Ramy Ashour.
Country  England
Residence Harold Wood, England
Born (1983-09-26) 26 September 1983 (age 33)
London, England
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight 82 kg (181 lb)
Turned Pro 2002
Retired 2015
Plays Left Handed
Coached by Paul Carter
Peter Nicol
Ben Ford
Racquet used Wilson
Men's singles
Highest ranking No. 5 (December, 2012)
Title(s) 16
Tour final(s) 26
World Open SF (2010)
Last updated on: July 2015.

Peter Barker (born 26 September 1983 in Harold Wood, England)[1] is a professional squash player from Upminster, England.

Barker reached a world ranking of 13 in November 2007, the same month that he was selected to represent the senior England team at the World Team Championships in December 2008, held in India.

Peter Barker has 12 professional tour titles to his name out of 15 final appearances. In September 2008, Barker defeated David Palmer twice, with a decisive 3–0 victory over David Palmer in Chicago at the Sweet Home Chicago Open, and a 3–2 victory in Baltimore at the Merrit Properties Open. Barker's highest world ranking of 7 was reached in May 2009.[1]

In 2010, Barker won the bronze medal in the 2010 Commonwealth Games squash men's singles event in Delhi after defeating Mohd Azlan Iskandar from Malaysia in straight sets, 11-5, 11–4, 11–2. The match ended in 45 minutes. Barker had match point against Ramy Ashour in the quarterfinals of the 2012 U.S. Open, but lost the match in five games. Ashour went on to win the US Open.[2]

Barker attended Brentwood School from 1995 to 2002.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Peter Barker (England)". SquashInfo. Retrieved 2009-02-05. 
  2. ^ "Day Five – the Finals". Squashsite. October 8, 2010. Retrieved October 8, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Famous OBs". Old Brentwoods. Brentwood School. Retrieved 2009-02-05. 

External links[edit]