Peter Brimelow

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Peter Brimelow
Born (1947-10-13) 13 October 1947 (age 75)
NationalityBritish
American
CitizenshipNaturalized U.S. citizen
EducationUniversity of Sussex, B.A. (with honors), 1970
Stanford University, M.B.A., 1972
Occupation(s)Financial journalist, columnist, writer
Employers
ChildrenHannah Claire Brimelow[1]
Awards

Peter Brimelow (born 13 October 1947) is a British-born American white nationalist and white supremacist writer.[2][3][4][5] He is the founder of the website VDARE, an anti-immigration site associated with white supremacy,[4][6] white nationalism,[7][8][9] and the alt-right.[10][11][12] He believes that "whites built American culture" and that "it is at risk from non-whites who would seek to change it".[4][13][14]

Brimelow was previously a writer and editor at National Review, and columnist for Dow Jones' MarketWatch.[15] Brimelow founded the Center for American Unity in 1999 and served as its first president. He describes himself as a paleoconservative.[16] Brimelow has also been described as a leader within the alt-right movement.[17] He rejects the labels of "white supremacist" and "white nationalist" and prefers to be known as a "civic nationalist". In January 2021, a judge dismissed a lawsuit Brimelow brought against The New York Times, ruling that his being called a "white nationalist" was not defamatory.[18] According to the New York Times, Brimelow had a direct reporting relationship with Rupert Murdoch at Fox News.[19]

Early life and education[edit]

Brimelow was born in 1947 in Warrington, Lancashire, England, the son of Bessie (née Knox) and Frank Sanderson Brimelow, a transport executive. Brimelow (and his twin brother) studied at the University of Sussex (BA, 1970) and Stanford University (MBA, 1972).[20]

Career[edit]

After working as a securities analyst, he moved to Toronto to work as a business writer and editor at the Financial Post and Maclean's. From 1978 to 1980, he was an aide to US Senator Orrin Hatch. In 1980, Brimelow moved to New York and worked for Barron's and Fortune.

In 1990, Brimelow and Leslie Spencer's article "The Litigation Scandal", written for Forbes, won a Gerald Loeb Award in the "Magazine" category.[21]

Views and publications[edit]

Brimelow opposes both illegal and legal immigration,[22][23] despite having immigrated to the United States himself, and has referred to Spanish-speaking immigrants as "completely dysfunctional".[22] He said California used to be a "paradise" but was "rapidly turning into Hispanic slum".[22] Brimelow has been described as a white nationalist[24] and a white supremacist.[25] In 2020, Brimelow sued The New York Times for labeling him a "white nationalist".[26] In 2022, after reports of a draft Supreme Court opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, he wrote, "Next step Brown vs. Board!" in opposition to the landmark decision overturning segregation.[27]

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) has described Brimelow's website VDARE as a hate group,[9][28][29] that was "once a relatively mainstream anti-immigration page", but by 2003 became "a meeting place for many on the radical right". The SPLC also criticized VDARE for publishing articles by white nationalists Jared Taylor and Sam Francis.[30] It has been called "white nationalist" by the Rocky Mountain News.[31] It has also been described as white supremacist.[32] VDARE has also been described by the Anti-Defamation League as a racist anti-immigrant group.[33][34]

Brimelow has appeared as a guest on The Political Cesspool, a "pro-white" talk radio show. Following the 2008 presidential election, Brimelow advocated that to win, the Republican Party should focus on "white votes".[35][36][37]

As of 2010 he was a senior contributing editor at Alternative Right, a website edited by Richard Spencer, according to the SPLC.[38] He has spoken at events hosted by the National Policy Institute run by Spencer, according to the SPLC.[39]

Brimelow appeared on a panel discussing multiculturalism during the 2012 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC 2012), and gave a talk titled "The Failure of Multiculturalism: How the pursuit of diversity is weakening the American Identity". In the face of condemnation from MSNBC and PFTAW, Al Cardenas of the American Conservative Union denied knowing Brimelow.[40]

Larry Auster, also a prominent immigration restrictionist, was a fierce critic of Brimelow's approach to the issue. For example, Auster criticized Brimelow's promotion of the views of antisemitic conspiracy theorist[41][42] Kevin MacDonald in the following manner: "The views of Alex Linder are not fundamentally different from those of Kevin MacDonald, who is published by Peter Brimelow and Richard Spencer. The only real difference between Linder and MacDonald is that Linder explicitly touts his goal of removing all Jews from the earth, while in MacDonald’s case the same goal is implicit."[43]

Alien Nation[edit]

External video
video icon Booknotes interview with Brimelow on Alien Nation, June 11, 1995, C-SPAN

Brimelow's book Alien Nation: Common Sense About America's Immigration Disaster criticizes U.S. immigration policy after 1965.[44]

A review in Foreign Affairs acknowledged that the book raised a number of persuasive objections to contemporary American immigration policies, but criticized Brimelow for "defining American identity in racial as opposed to cultural terms", and for the "extreme character" of his proposals.[44]

The SPLC described it as an "infamous anti-immigrant book", and pointed to Center for Immigration Studies executive director Mark Krikorian's positive review of the book as evidence his organization had close ties to white nationalists.[45]

The Worm in the Apple[edit]

External video
video icon Presentation by Brimelow on The Worm in the Apple, February 24, 2003, C-SPAN

The Worm in the Apple discusses public education and teachers' unions, considering unions as "highly destructive".[46] David Gordon summarizes Brimelow's view in his review of the book in The Mises Review: "to attempt so far-reaching a goal as universal high school education is foolish."[47] John O'Sullivan[48] praised the book. For the Hoover Institution journal Education Next, public policy consultant George Mitchell wrote: "Brimelow... demonstrates how collective bargaining for teachers has produced labor agreements that stifle innovation and risk taking. He makes it clear that the dramatic rise in influence enjoyed by the teacher unions has coincided with stagnant and unacceptable levels of student performance." However, in the same journal article, education consultant Julia E. Koppich took a more critical angle: "Brimelow uses a variety of linguistic devices to drive home his points. But his over-the-top language soon grates on the nerves... His argument is not that teacher unions are destroying American education, but that they labor long and hard to preserve the status quo... But this book contains so little about education-virtually nothing about classrooms, schools, or districts-even that point gets lost." Koppich called the book "an anti-public school polemic".[49]

The Patriot Game[edit]

In an article in Maclean's which was published in 2011, John M. Geddes says that Brimelow's book The Patriot Game: National Dreams and Political Realities "offered a bracingly of-the-moment conservative critique of Canada," and said that it was instrumental in shaping the thought process of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.[50]

Writings[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Silverman, Robert (3 August 2021). "How 'Coward and Phony' Tim Pool Became One of the Biggest Political YouTubers on the Planet". The Daily Beast.
  2. ^ "The Scourge Of White Supremacism, And Why It Matters". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. 30 November 2016. Retrieved 12 June 2022.
  3. ^ Small, Jim (26 February 2022). "Wendy Rogers said white nationalists are 'patriots' and called for hanging political enemies". Arizona Mirror.
  4. ^ a b c Frizell, Sam (21 July 2016). "GOP Shows White Supremacist's Tweet During Trump's Speech". Time. Archived from the original on 11 June 2017.
  5. ^ Hayden, Michael Edison; Squire, Megan. "How Cryptocurrency Revolutionized the White Supremacist Movement". Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved 12 June 2022.
  6. ^ Arnold, Kathleen (2011). Anti-Immigration in the United States: A Historical Encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. p. 89. ISBN 9780313375224. Retrieved 30 August 2017.
  7. ^ Folk, Holly (2017). The Religion of Chiropractic: Populist Healing from the American Heartland. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press. p. 64. ...the white nationalist website VDARE.com.
  8. ^ Sussman, Robert W. (2014). The Myth of Race: The Troubling Persistence of an Unscientific Idea. New Haven, Connecticut: Harvard University Press. p. 299. ISBN 9780674660038.
  9. ^ a b Phillips, Kristine (26 January 2017). "Resort cancels 'white nationalist' organization's first-ever conference over the group's views". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 7 November 2019. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  10. ^ Beirich, Heidi; Potok, Mark (Winter 2003). "'Paleoconservatives' Decry Immigration". Intelligence Report. Southern Poverty Law Center. Archived from the original on 19 December 2019. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  11. ^ Stephen Piggott (21 December 2016). "Ann Coulter Attends VDARE Christmas Party – Her Second White Nationalist Event In Three Months". Southern Poverty Law Center. Archived from the original on 25 February 2020. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  12. ^ Gais, Hannah (11 December 2016). "Cucking and Nazi salutes: A night out with the alt-right". Washington Spectator. Archived from the original on 9 August 2019. Retrieved 10 January 2020 – via Newsweek.
  13. ^ Fernandes, Deepa (2011). Targeted: Homeland Security and the Business of Immigration. New York City: Seven Stories Press. ISBN 9781583229545. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  14. ^ Michel, Casey (18 November 2016). "Steve Bannon's dangerous campaign to rebrand racism as American "nationalism"". Quartz. Archived from the original on 13 June 2018. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  15. ^ "Peter Brimelow". MarketWatch.com. The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on 13 May 2014. Retrieved 11 January 2020. Peter Brimelow has been an editor at Barron's, Fortune and Forbes and is the author of 'The Wall Street Gurus: How You Can Profit From Investment Newsletters'.
  16. ^ Beirich, Heidi; Potok, Mark (Winter 2003). "'Paleoconservatives' Decry Immigration". Intelligence Report (112). Archived from the original on 13 February 2012. Retrieved 12 February 2012.
  17. ^ "Four lessons from the alt-right's D.C. coming-out party". The Washington Post. 30 September 2016. Archived from the original on 16 November 2016. Retrieved 26 August 2017.
  18. ^ "Court Rules that Being Called a White Nationalist is Not a Defamatory Statement of Fact". JD Supra. Hodgson Russ LLP. 12 January 2021.
  19. ^ Confessore, Nicholas (30 April 2022). "How Tucker Carlson Stoked White Fear to Conquer Cable". New York Times.
  20. ^ "Ruth Cheney Streeter Weds". The New York Times. 19 January 1986. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 13 February 2012. ... John Brimelow, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank S. Brimelow of Birkenhead, Merseyside, England... Peter Brimelow was his twin's best man.
  21. ^ Olson, Walter (1 September 1990). "Award-Winning Journalism". Manhattan Institute. Archived from the original on 13 February 2019. Retrieved 5 February 2019.
  22. ^ a b c Caldwell, Leigh Ann (11 February 2012). "Immigration speaker sparks controversy at CPAC". CBS News. Archived from the original on 13 June 2018. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  23. ^ Hawley, George (2017). Making Sense of the Alt-Right. New York City: Columbia University Press. p. 39. ISBN 9780231546003. Archived from the original on 21 June 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  24. ^ Obeidallah, Dean (1 February 2018). "Trump's Mainstreaming of 'Chain Migration': A White Supremacist's Dream". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on 7 December 2018. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  25. ^ Thielman, Sam (9 May 2019). "The fascist next door: how to cover hate". Columbia Journalism Review. New York City: Columbia University. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 14 August 2019.
  26. ^ Gerstein, Josh (9 January 2020). "Anti-immigration author sues NYT over 'white nationalist' label". Politico. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  27. ^ Twitter https://twitter.com/nickmartin/status/1521555176515014656. Retrieved 3 May 2022. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  28. ^ "VDARE". Southern Poverty Law Center. Archived from the original on 8 October 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  29. ^ VDARE Archived 12 July 2014 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  30. ^ Beirich and Mark Potok, Heidi. "'Paleoconservatives' Decry Immigration | Southern Poverty Law Center". Splcenter.org. Archived from the original on 5 November 2014. Retrieved 22 March 2012.
  31. ^ Flynn, Kevin (15 July 2006). "Funding questioned; Critics say some Defend Colorado money tainted". Rocky Mountain News. p. 4.A.
  32. ^ Sam Frizell (21 July 2016). "GOP Shows White Supremacist's Tweet During Trump's Speech". Time. Archived from the original on 11 June 2017. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  33. ^ "Brenda Walker and Dan Amato Inject Anti-Immigrant Fervor into the Blogosphere" (PDF). Anti-Defamation League. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 August 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  34. ^ "Immigrants Targeted: Extremist Rhetoric Moves into the Mainstream" (PDF). Anti-Defamation League. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 August 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  35. ^ "VDARE: GOP Should Focus on Whites". Intelligence Report. No. Spring 2009. Southern Poverty Law Center. 16 February 2009. Archived from the original on 21 April 2020.
  36. ^ VDARE Foundation - SPLCenter.org Archived 11 February 2012 at the Wayback Machine.
  37. ^ "VDARE". Intelligence Files. Southern Poverty Law Center. July 2011. Archived from the original on 11 February 2012. Retrieved 13 February 2012.
  38. ^ "Paleocon Starts New Extreme-Right Magazine". Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved 29 November 2022.
  39. ^ "Peter Brimelow". Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved 29 November 2022.
  40. ^ Caldwell, Leigh Ann (11 February 2012). "Immigration speaker sparks controversy at CPAC". CBS News. Archived from the original on 13 February 2012. Retrieved 12 February 2012.
  41. ^ "Kevin MacDonald" (PDF). Anti-Defamation League. November 2013. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 March 2018. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  42. ^ Blutinger, Jeffrey C. (Spring 2021). "A New Protocols: Kevin MacDonald's Reconceptualization of Antisemitic Conspiracy Theory". Antisemitism Studies. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press. 5 (1): 4–43. doi:10.2979/antistud.5.1.02. JSTOR 10.2979/antistud.5.1.02. S2CID 234772531.
  43. ^ Auster, Larry (21 September 2011). "Exterminationist Anti-Semites". View From The Right. Retrieved 20 January 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  44. ^ a b Hendrickson, David C. (7 July 1995). "Alien Nation: Common Sense About America's Immigration Disaster". Foreign Affairs. doi:10.2307/20047239. JSTOR 20047239. Archived from the original on 11 February 2020. Retrieved 14 August 2019.
  45. ^ Piggott, Stephen; Amend, Alex (23 May 2017). "More Than An Occasional Crank: 2,012 Times the Center for Immigration Studies Circulated White Nationalist Content". Southern Poverty Law Center. Archived from the original on 13 August 2019. Retrieved 14 August 2019.
  46. ^ Leef, George (4 November 2004). "No. 155: Worm in the Apple: Teachers Unions Operate Like Mafia". Carolina Journal. Archived from the original on 29 September 2011. Retrieved 16 July 2011.
  47. ^ "A Monopoly of Ignorance". The Mises Review. Winter 2003. Archived from the original on 24 October 2008.
  48. ^ O'Sullivan, John (20 May 2003). "Blame pain-in-the-neck unions for education bow tie". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on 22 May 2003.
  49. ^ Mitchell, George; Koppich, Julia E. (Spring 2004). "Teachers Unions". Education Next. Archived from the original on 9 October 2011. Retrieved 16 July 2011.
  50. ^ Geddes, John (4 August 2011). "That best political book contest: but what about real influence?". Maclean's. Archived from the original on 10 January 2018. Retrieved 10 January 2018.

External links[edit]