Peter Dingle

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Peter Dingle was formerly an associate professor at the School of Environmental Science at Murdoch University, in Perth, Australia. He is a public health and motivational speaker in subjects of sustainable health, and has published 12 books including "The Great Cholesterol Deception".[1] In addition he co-presented SBS's Is Your House Killing You and appeared in ABC's Can We Help.


Education[edit]

Dingle has Bachelor of Education in Science, a Bachelor of Environmental Science with first class honours, and a PhD.[2]

Research[edit]

Dingle's research interests include environmental and nutritional toxicology and health.His honours thesis investigated exposure to and health effects from domestic pesticides and his PhD investigated exposure to and health effects from formaldehyde in the home in 1994. Since 1994 he has been active in research on the role of the environment, nutrition and lifestyle contributors to chronic health conditions.[3]

Controversy[edit]

Dingle's first wife, Penelope, died in August 2005 from cancer following a failed attempt to treat her using homeopathy and spirituality in 2003. Due to the delay in seeking competent medical care, the cancer spread to organs and bone and Penny's weight dropped to 35 kg before eventually suffering a complete bowel obstruction forcing her to undergo an emergency extreme operation of a palliative nature in October 2003 before dying in 2005. The State Coroner noted that Dingle had not done enough to convince his wife to seek timely medical treatment, and that his inaction had contributed to Penelope's death. The Coroner also found that the symptoms had been present from at least as early as October 2001, while she was under the care of a homeopath (whom he described as "not a competent health professional") before finally consulting a doctor in December 2002. In early 2003, her cancer was diagnosed and she was presented with a treatment option which the coroner found would have given her a "good chance of surviving". The coroner also found that her decision to not undergo timely treatment by a competent health professional was "influenced by misinformation and bad science".[4] Dr Dingle continues to be an advocate for sustainable health.[5][6] Dr Dingle is outspoken against the overuse of pharmaceuticals and has published two books on the topic. "The Great Choleserol Deception" and "Medical Myths and Health Lies that are Killing us".

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About Dr. Dingle". DrDingle.com. Retrieved 2012-07-23. 
  2. ^ "Dr Peter Dingle Qualifications". DrDingle.com. Retrieved 2013-11-14. 
  3. ^ "Publications list for Dingle, Peter at the Murdoch Research Repository". Murdoch University Library. Retrieved 2013-11-14. 
  4. ^ http://www.homeowatch.org/news/dingle_finding.pdf
  5. ^ "Desperate Remedies Part Two - Transcript". ABC. Retrieved 2012-11-10. 
  6. ^ "6PR drops Dingle as science expert". The West Australian. Retrieved 2012-11-11.