Peter Drummond-Burrell, 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby

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The Lord Willoughby de Eresby

Member of Parliament for Boston
In office
1812–1820
Preceded byWilliam Madocks
Thomas Fydell
Succeeded byHenry Ellis
Gilbert Heathcote
Personal details
Born
Peter Robert Burrell

(1782-03-19)19 March 1782
Died22 February 1865(1865-02-22) (aged 82)
Political partyWhig, Tories
Spouse(s)
Sarah Clementina Drummond
(m. 1807; her death 1865)
RelationsPeter Burrell (grandfather)
Peregrine Bertie, 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven (grandfather)
ParentsPeter Burrell, 1st Baron Gwydyr
Priscilla Bertie, 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby

Peter Robert Drummond-Burrell, 2nd Baron Gwydyr, 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby PC (19 March 1782 – 22 February 1865), was a British politician and nobleman.

Early life[edit]

Born Peter Robert Burrell, he was the eldest of three sons born to Peter Burrell, 1st Baron Gwydyr (1754–1820), and Priscilla Bertie, 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby (1761–1828). His paternal grandfather was Peter Burrell, a Member of Parliament and Surveyor General of the Land Revenues of the Crown, and his maternal grandfather was Peregrine Bertie, 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven. His mother succeeded to a large part of the Ancaster estates in 1779, to the barony of Willoughby of Eresby in 1780 and to the hereditary office of Lord Great Chamberlain.

Career[edit]

From 1812 until 1820, he was Member of Parliament for Boston in Lincolnshire. Up to the 1832 Reform Act Drummond-Burrell was a Whig, but by 1841 had changed his allegiance to the Tories.[1]

On 29 June 1820, he succeeded his father as 2nd Baron Gwydyr, 3rd Baronet Burell of Knipp and Deputy Lord Great Chamberlain. On 29 December 1828, he succeeded his mother as 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby and joint (1/2) hereditary Lord Great Chamberlain.

Personal life[edit]

Tomb, alongside that of his wife, and second daughter, behind the Church of St Michael and All Angels, Edenham, Lincolnshire

On 19 October 1807, he married Sarah Clementina Drummond (1786–1865), daughter of James Drummond, 11th Earl of Perth, and Clementina Elphinstone (a daughter of Charles Elphinstone, 10th Lord Elphinstone). Together, they were the parents of five children:

His wife died on 26 January 1865. He died less than a month later, on 22 February 1865. They are buried side by side in the churchyard of St Michael and All Angels, Edenham, Lincolnshire. The canopied tomb of their second daughter, Elizabeth Susan (d. 1853) is adjacent, and those of their son Albyric (d. 1870) and grandson Gilbert Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 1st Earl of Ancaster (d. 1910), are nearby. All five tombs are Grade II listed, some jointly.[4][5][6]

Legacy[edit]

Gwydyr Mansions in Hove, East Sussex, were named after him in honour of his friendship with the Goldsmid family, upon whose land the development was built in 1890.[7]

The Gwydir River in New South Wales was named for him by the explorer Allan Cunningham, for whom he was a patron.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Olney R. J. (1973); Lincolnshire Politics 1832–1885, Oxford University Press, p. 19. ISBN 0198218486.
  2. ^ "Hon. Elizabeth Susan Drummond-Burrell". thepeerage.com. 1 September 2014. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  3. ^ Lodge, Edmund (1834). Peerage of the British Empire (3rd ed.). London: Saunders and Otley. p. 476. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  4. ^ Historic England. "Pair of tombs at east end of Church of St. Michael (Baron and Lady Willoughby de Eresby)  (Grade II) (1062830)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  5. ^ Historic England. "Tomb at east end of Church of St.Michael (Hon. Elizabeth Susan Willougby)  (Grade II) (1308901)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  6. ^ Historic England. "Pair of tombs at east end of Church of St. Michael (Alberic Drummond Willoughby and Earl of Ancaster)  (Grade II) (1360078)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  7. ^ Middleton, Judy (2002). The Encyclopaedia of Hove & Portslade. Brighton: Brighton & Hove Libraries. Vol. 6, p. 68.
  8. ^ "Gwydir River". Geographical Names Register (GNR) of NSW. Geographical Names Board of New South Wales. Retrieved 28 March 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
William Madocks
Thomas Fydell
Member of Parliament for Boston
1812–1820
With: William Madocks
Succeeded by
Henry Ellis
Gilbert Heathcote
Court offices
Preceded by
The Lord Gwydyr
as Deputy
Lord Great Chamberlain
Acting

1821–1828
Succeeded by
Himself
Preceded by
Himself
as Deputy
Lord Great Chamberlain
1828–1830
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Cholmondeley
as Deputy
Preceded by
The Marquess of Cholmondeley
as Deputy
Lord Great Chamberlain
1837–1865
Succeeded by
The 23rd Lord Willoughby de Eresby
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Thomas Assheton Smith
Lord Lieutenant of Caernarvonshire
1828–1851
Succeeded by
Sir Richard Williams-Bulkeley, Bt
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Priscilla Bertie
Baron Willoughby de Eresby
1828–1865
Succeeded by
Albyric Drummond-Willoughby
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir Peter Burrell
Baron Gwydyr
1820–1865
Succeeded by
Albyric Drummond-Willoughby