Peter Hajek

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Peter Hajek is a British psychologist. He is professor of clinical psychology and director of the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine's Tobacco Dependence Research Unit at Queen Mary University of London.[1] He is known for his research into smoking cessation,[2] including the effectiveness of electronic cigarettes for this purpose.[3]

Education and academic career[edit]

Hajek received his PhD from Charles University in Prague in 1973. In 1982, he moved to England, where he joined the Institute of Psychiatry's Addiction Research Unit. He became a lecturer at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry in 1992, and became a professor there in 1998.[1]

Scientific work[edit]

Hajek is the author of over 250 peer-reviewed papers, and has helped develop treatments for people who are dependent on cigarette smoking.[4] He is known for his research into electronic cigarettes, which, he has said, are "at least as effective as nicotine patches" for smoking cessation in the context of minimum support.[5] In 2014, Hajek and other researchers published a paper criticizing a World Health Organization report on electronic cigarettes published earlier that year, which they said had made "misleading" assumptions.[6] Hajek has told the BBC that "...the risks [of electronic cigarettes] are unlikely, some already proven not to exist, while the benefits are potentially enormous."[6] Also in 2014, Hajek co-authored a Cochrane review of the effectiveness of electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation; the review found limited evidence that they were effective for this purpose. Hajek described the results of this review as "encouraging".[7] In February 2019 he published "A Randomized Trial of E-Cigarettes versus Nicotine-Replacement Therapy" in the New England Journal of Medicine[8].. This landmark study demonstrated that smokers who used e-cigarettes to help them quit were 83% more likely to have quit smoking at one year than those who used conventional nicotine replacement therapy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Peter Hajek". GRAND Website. Retrieved 5 April 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Safe to Quit Smoking Before Surgery, Anytime". Fox News. Reuters. 18 March 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "E-cigarettes 'less harmful' than cigarettes". BBC. 31 July 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ Siggins, Lorna (18 February 2014). "E-cigarettes: the Big White Hope in a life-or-death fight with tobacco". The Irish Times. Retrieved 5 April 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Gallagher, James (8 September 2013). "E-cigarettes 'as effective' as nicotine patches". BBC News. Retrieved 5 April 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ a b Triggle, Nick (5 September 2014). "E-cigarette criticisms 'alarmist' say researchers". BBC News. Retrieved 5 April 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Review of evidence finds e-cigarettes may help smokers quit". Reuters. 17 December 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Hajek, Peter (14 February 2019). "A Randomized Trial of E-Cigarettes versus Nicotine-Replacement Therapy". N Engl J Med. 380 (7): 629–637. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1808779. PMID 30699054. Retrieved 22 February 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]