Peter Steindl

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Peter Steindl
Personal information
Full name Peter David Steindl
Born (1970-06-14) 14 June 1970 (age 46)
Bundaberg, Queensland
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Role Bowler
Domestic team information
Years Team
1995–2003 Scotland
Career statistics
Competition FC LA
Matches 1 10
Runs scored 14 52
Batting average 14.00 17.33
100s/50s 0/0 0/0
Top score 14 18
Balls bowled 126 420
Wickets 0 7
Bowling average n/a 48.57
5 wickets in innings 0 0
10 wickets in match 0 n/a
Best bowling 0/46 3/43
Catches/stumpings 0/– 0/–
Source: CricketArchive, 20 May 2014

Peter David Steindl (born 14 June 1970) is a former Scottish cricketer who played a number of matches for the Scottish national side. He later served in several coaching roles with Cricket Scotland, including as coach of the national team from 2007 to 2013.

Born in Bundaberg, Queensland, Steindl was raised in Australia, but moved to Scotland in 1993, with his Scottish wife.[1] His first matches for a Scottish representative side came during a 1993–94 tour of Zimbabwe.[2] A medium-pacer, most of Steindl's matches for Scotland came in the limited-overs Benson & Hedges Cup and Natwest Trophy (later called the C&G Trophy).[3] Beginning in 1995, he played ten matches in those competitions, all against English county sides, with his best figures, 3/43, coming against Derbyshire during the 1995 season.[4] Steindl did, however, play one first-class match, going wicketless against a touring Australia A side in August 1998.[5] He was in Scotland's squad for the 1999 World Cup, but failed to play a game.[1]

Steindl worked for a time in Edinburgh Council youth programmes before joining Cricket Scotland as youth development manager in 2006, replacing former teammate Andy Tennant.[1] After Scotland's senior coach, Peter Drinnen, resigned in July 2007, he and Tennant took over the team on an interim basis.[6][7] Steindl was permanently appointed to the position in December 2007.[8] He coached the team at the 2009 ICC World Twenty20, and was tasked with "rebuilding the side" after a number of senior players retired.[9] Steindl signed a three-year contract extension in February 2012, but resigned from the position in December 2013, after Scotland were unsuccessful at the 2013 World Twenty20 Qualifier.[10][11] He was subsequently appointed coach of the Carlton Cricket Club, playing in the Eastern Premier Division of the Scottish National Cricket League.[12] Steindl was succeeded as Scotland coach by Craig Wright and Paul Collingwood, on a transitional basis, and then by New Zealand Grant Bradburn, from April 2014.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Peter Steindl player profile and statistics – ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  2. ^ Miscellaneous matches played by Pete Steindl (61) – CricketArchive. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  3. ^ List A matches played by Pete Steindl (10) – CricketArchive. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  4. ^ Scotland v Derbyshire, Benson and Hedges Cup 1995 (Group B) – CricketArchive. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  5. ^ First-class matches played by Peter Steindl (1) – CricketArchive. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  6. ^ (6 July 2007). "Drinnen resigns as Scotland coach" – BBC Sport. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  7. ^ Neil Drysdale (7 July 2007). "From farce to fudge" – ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  8. ^ (19 December 2007). "Steindl appointed Scotland coach" – ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  9. ^ (9 February 2012). "Steindl extends Scotland deal" – ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  10. ^ David Currie (18 December 2013). "Head coach Peter Steindl to exit Scotland cricket role" – BBC Scotland. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  11. ^ (8 January 2014). "PETER STEINDL STEPS DOWN FROM HEAD COACH ROLE" – Cricket Scotland. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  12. ^ (29 March 2014). "Carlton appoint Peter Steindl as Head Coach" – CricketEurope Scotland. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  13. ^ (28 April 2014). "CS ANNOUNCES NEW NATIONAL TEAM COACHING STRUCTURE" – Cricket Scotland. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Peter Drinnen
as permanent coach
Acting coach of Scotland
July 2007 – December 2007
(with Andy Tennant)
Succeeded by
Himself
as permanent coach
Preceded by
Himself
as acting coach
Coach of Scotland
December 2007 – December 2013
Succeeded by
Paul Collingwood and Craig Wright
as acting coaches