Petr Korda

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Petr Korda
Country (sports)Czechoslovakia (1987–1993)
Czech Republic
ResidenceMonte Carlo, Monaco & Bradenton, Florida
Born (1968-01-23) 23 January 1968 (age 53)
Prague, Czechoslovakia
Height1.90 m (6 ft 3 in)
Turned pro1987
Retired2005[1]
PlaysLeft-handed (one-handed backhand)
Prize money$10,448,900
Singles
Career record410–248
Career titles10
Highest rankingNo. 2 (2 February 1998)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenW (1998)
French OpenF (1992)
WimbledonQF (1998)
US OpenQF (1995, 1997)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsRR (1992)
Grand Slam CupW (1993)
Doubles
Career record234–160
Career titles10
Highest rankingNo. 10 (11 June 1990)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian OpenW (1996)
French OpenF (1990)
Wimbledon2R (1990, 1991)
US Open3R (1989, 1991, 1995)
Team competitions
Davis CupSF (1996)
Hopman CupW (1994)
Last updated on: July 1999.

Petr Korda (born 23 January 1968) is a Czech former professional tennis player. He won the 1998 Australian Open and was runner-up at the 1992 French Open, reaching a career-high ranking of No. 2 in February 1998. Korda tested positive for doping in July 1998 at Wimbledon, and was banned from September 1999 for 12 months, but he retired shortly before the ban.[2]

Tennis career[edit]

Juniors[edit]

He first came to the tennis world's attention as a promising junior player. In 1985, he partnered with fellow Czech Cyril Suk to win the boys' doubles title at the French Open. Korda and Suk ranked the joint-World No. 1 junior doubles players that year.

Junior Slam results:

  • Australian Open: -
  • French Open: 3R (1986)
  • Wimbledon: QF (1986)
  • US Open: QF (1986)

Professional career[edit]

Korda turned professional in 1987. He won his first career doubles title in 1988, and his first top-level singles title in 1991. Korda was involved in four Grand Slam finals during his career – two in singles and two in doubles. Korda also was known for the "Scissors Kick" which he would do at midcourt after winning matches.

In 1990, Korda and Goran Ivanišević finished runners-up in the men's doubles at the French Open, and as a result, Korda reached his career-high doubles ranking of world No. 10. In 1992, he rose to the men's singles final at the French Open beating Christian Bergström, Shuzo Matsuoka, Michiel Schapers, Jaime Oncins, Andrei Cherkasov and Henri Leconte, before he was defeated in straight sets by defending champion Jim Courier 7–5, 6–2, 6–1.

A highlight of Korda's career include winning the Grand Slam Cup in 1993, with five-set wins in the semifinal and final over Pete Sampras and Michael Stich, the number 1 and 2 tennis players in the world at that time. Korda also was a part of the Czech Republic's team which won the Hopman Cup in 1994. In 1996 he teamed-up with Stefan Edberg to win the men's doubles title at the Australian Open. He also upset the defending champion, Pete Sampras, in five sets in the fourth round of the 1997 US Open.

The crowning moment of Korda's career came in 1998, when he defeated Albert Portas, Scott Draper, Vincent Spadea, Cédric Pioline, Jonas Björkman and Karol Kučera to face Marcelo Ríos in the men's singles final at the Australian Open. Korda dominated the match from start to finish by winning in straight sets 6–2, 6–2, 6–2 and claimed his first Grand Slam singles title in just 1 hour and 25 minutes. The win propelled him to his career-high singles ranking of World No. 2. At four tournaments in 1998, Korda had the world No. 1 ranking in his sights, but he lost to Karol Kučera in Antwerp, Marcelo Ríos at Indian Wells, Tim Henman in Miami and Richard Krajicek in Monte Carlo.

Suspension and retirement[edit]

Following his quarterfinal match against Tim Henman at the Wimbledon 1998, Korda tested positive for the banned steroid nandrolone.[3][4] This came to light in December 1998 when the appeals board of the International Tennis Federation (ITF) accepted his denial of intent and agreed not to ban him, instead merely withholding his Wimbledon prize money and ranking points.[3] The ensuing controversy caused the ITF to launch an appeal against its own decision at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).[3] In January 1999 Korda obtained a ruling in the High Court of England and Wales that the ITF could not appeal,[5] but the High Court ruling was overturned by the Court of Appeal. In July 1999 the CAS allowed the ITF appeal and on 1 September 1999 the ITF banned Korda for 12 months and stripped him of all prize money and ranking points since the failed test.[3]

Before the ban, Korda had already announced his retirement, after losing to Danny Sapsford and failing to qualify for Wimbledon 1999.[3] However, after his ban he competed in Czech ATP Challenger Tour events: the Prague Open (singles and doubles) in December 2000 and the Czech Open (doubles) in 2001 and 2005.

Personal life[edit]

Korda married Regina Rajchrtová, a former professional tennis player from Czechoslovakia. They have three children, the oldest of whom, Jessica, was born on 27 February 1993; she is a professional golfer, and finished 19th in the 2008 U.S. Women's Open as a 15-year-old, with Korda as her caddy. At the 2013 U.S. Women's Open, Petr caddied for another of their daughters, Nelly, who was 14 years old at the time and the youngest player in the tournament.[6] His son, Sebastian, is also a tennis player and was the top-ranked junior in the world while representing the United States.[7][8] Sebastian won the junior boys’ Australian Open title in 2018.

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Singles: 2 (1 title, 1 runner-up)[edit]

Result Year Championship Surface Opponent Score
Loss 1992 French Open Clay United States Jim Courier 5–7, 2–6, 1–6
Win 1998 Australian Open Hard Chile Marcelo Ríos 6–2, 6–2, 6–2

Doubles: 2 (1 title, 1 runner-up)[edit]

Result Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 1990 French Open Clay Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Goran Ivanišević Spain Sergio Casal
Spain Emilio Sánchez Vicario
5–7, 3–6
Win 1996 Australian Open Hard Sweden Stefan Edberg Canada Sébastien Lareau
United States Alex O'Brien
7–5, 7–5, 4–6, 6–1

ATP career finals[edit]

Singles: 27 (10 titles, 17 runners-up)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam (1–1)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
Grand Slam Cup (1–0)
ATP Masters Series (1–2)
ATP Championship Series (2–5)
ATP World Series (5–9)
Titles by surface
Hard (6–8)
Clay (0–4)
Grass (0–1)
Carpet (4–4)
Result No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Loss 1. 30 October 1989 Frankfurt, Germany Carpet United States Kevin Curren 2–6, 5–7
Loss 2. 6 May 1991 Tampa, US Clay United States Richey Reneberg 6–4, 4–6, 2–6
Loss 3. 22 July 1991 Washington, D.C., US Hard United States Andre Agassi 3–6, 4–6
Loss 4. 29 July 1991 Montreal, Canada Hard Soviet Union Andrei Chesnokov 6–3, 4–6, 3–6
Win 1. 19 August 1991 New Haven, US Hard Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Goran Ivanišević 6–4, 6–2
Win 2. 14 October 1991 Berlin, Germany Carpet France Arnaud Boetsch 6–3, 6–4
Loss 5. 4 May 1992 Munich, Germany Clay Sweden Magnus Larsson 4–6, 6–4, 1–6
Loss 6. 8 June 1992 French Open, Paris Clay United States Jim Courier 5–7, 2–6, 1–6
Win 3. 20 July 1992 Washington, D.C., US Hard Sweden Henrik Holm 6–4, 6–4
Win 4. 31 August 1992 Long Island, US Hard Czechoslovakia Ivan Lendl 6–2, 6–2
Loss 7. 5 October 1992 Basel, Switzerland Hard (i) Germany Boris Becker 6–3, 3–6, 2–6, 4–6
Loss 8. 12 October 1992 Toulouse, France Hard (i) France Guy Forget 3–6, 2–6
Win 5. 26 October 1992 Vienna, Austria Carpet Italy Gianluca Pozzi 6–3, 6–2, 5–7, 6–1
Loss 9. 23 August 1993 New Haven, US Hard Ukraine Andrei Medvedev 5–7, 4–6
Loss 10. 11 October 1993 Sydney, Australia Hard (i) Peru Jaime Yzaga 4–6, 6–4, 6–7(4–7), 6–7(7–9)
Win 6. 13 December 1993 Grand Slam Cup, Munich, Germany Carpet Germany Michael Stich 2–6, 6–4, 7–6(7–5), 2–6, 11–9
Loss 11. 14 February 1994 Milan, Italy Carpet Germany Boris Becker 2–6, 6–3, 3–6
Loss 12. 7 March 1994 Indian Wells, US Hard United States Pete Sampras 6–4, 3–6, 6–3, 3–6, 2–6
Loss 13. 2 May 1994 Munich, Germany Clay Germany Michael Stich 2–6, 6–2, 3–6
Win 7. 8 January 1996 Doha, Qatar Hard Morocco Younes El Aynaoui 7–6(7–5), 2–6, 7–6(7–5)
Loss 14. 22 July 1996 Ostrava, Czech Republic Carpet Germany David Prinosil 1–6, 2–6
Loss 15. 16 June 1997 Halle, Germany Grass Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–7(2–7), 7–6(7–5), 6–7(7–9)
Loss 16. 21 July 1997 Washington, D.C., US Hard United States Michael Chang 7–5, 2–6, 1–6
Win 8. 27 October 1997 Stuttgart, Germany Carpet Netherlands Richard Krajicek 7–6(8–6), 6–2, 6–4
Loss 17. 10 November 1997 Moscow, Russia Carpet Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–7(2–7), 4–6
Win 9. 12 January 1998 Doha, Qatar Hard France Fabrice Santoro 6–0, 6–3
Win 10. 2 February 1998 Australian Open, Melbourne Hard Chile Marcelo Ríos 6–2, 6–2, 6–2

Doubles: 24 (10 titles, 14 runners-up)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam (1–1)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
Grand Slam Cup (0–0)
ATP Masters Series (3–1)
ATP Championship Series (1–4)
ATP World Series (5–10)
Titles by surface
Hard (3–4)
Clay (5–9)
Grass (1–0)
Carpet (1–1)
Result No. Year Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 1. 1987 Palermo, Italy Clay Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd Mexico Leonardo Lavalle
Italy Claudio Panatta
6–3, 4–6, 4–6
Win 1. 1988 Gstaad, Switzerland Clay Czechoslovakia Milan Šrejber Ecuador Andrés Gómez
Spain Emilio Sánchez
7–6, 7–6
Win 2. 1988 Prague, Czechoslovakia Clay Czechoslovakia Jaroslav Navrátil Austria Thomas Muster
Austria Horst Skoff
7–5, 7–6
Loss 2. 1989 Gstaad, Switzerland Clay Czechoslovakia Milan Šrejber Brazil Cássio Motta
United States Todd Witsken
4–6, 3–6
Win 3. 1989 Stuttgart, Germany Clay Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd Romania Florin Segărceanu
Czechoslovakia Cyril Suk
6–7, 6–3, 6–1
Loss 3. 1989 Kitzbühel, Austria Clay Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd Spain Emilio Sánchez
Spain Javier Sánchez
5–7, 6–7
Loss 4. 1989 Prague, Czechoslovakia Clay United States Gene Mayer Spain Jordi Arrese
Austria Horst Skoff
4–6, 4–6
Win 4. 1990 Monte-Carlo, Monaco Clay Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd Ecuador Andrés Gómez
Spain Javier Sánchez
6–2, 6–1
Loss 5. 1990 Munich, Germany Clay Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd West Germany Udo Riglewski
West Germany Michael Stich
1–6, 4–6
Loss 6. 1990 French Open, Paris, France Clay Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Goran Ivanišević Spain Sergio Casal
Spain Emilio Sánchez
5–7, 3–6
Loss 7. 1990 New Haven, US Hard Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Goran Ivanišević United States Jeff Brown
United States Scott Melville
6–2, 5–7, 0–6
Win 5. 1991 New Haven, US Hard Australia Wally Masur United States Jeff Brown
United States Scott Melville
W/O
Win 6. 1991 Berlin, Germany Carpet Czechoslovakia Karel Nováček Netherlands Jan Siemerink
Czechoslovakia Daniel Vacek
3–6, 7–5, 7–5
Loss 8. 1991 Basel, Switzerland Hard (i) United States John McEnroe Switzerland Jakob Hlasek
United States Patrick McEnroe
6–3, 6–7, 6–7
Loss 9. 1992 Monte-Carlo, Monaco Clay Czechoslovakia Karel Nováček Germany Boris Becker
Germany Michael Stich
4–6, 4–6
Loss 10. 1992 Gstaad, Switzerland Clay Czechoslovakia Cyril Suk Netherlands Hendrik Jan Davids
Belgium Libor Pimek
W/O
Win 7. 1993 Monte-Carlo, Monaco Clay Sweden Stefan Edberg Netherlands Paul Haarhuis
Netherlands Mark Koevermans
6–2, 2–6, 7–5
Win 8. 1993 Halle, Germany Grass Czech Republic Cyril Suk United States Mike Bauer
Germany Marc-Kevin Goellner
7–6, 5–7, 6–3
Win 9. 1993 Cincinnati, US Hard United States Andre Agassi Sweden Stefan Edberg
Sweden Henrik Holm
6–4, 7–6
Loss 11. 1994 Munich, Germany Clay Germany Boris Becker Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Czech Republic David Rikl
6–7, 5–7
Loss 12. 1995 Milan, Italy Carpet Czech Republic Karel Nováček Germany Boris Becker
France Guy Forget
2–6, 4–6
Loss 13. 1995 Washington, D.C., US Hard Czech Republic Cyril Suk France Olivier Delaître
United States Jeff Tarango
6–1, 3–6, 2–6
Win 10. 1996 Australian Open, Melbourne, Australia Hard Sweden Stefan Edberg Canada Sébastien Lareau
United States Alex O'Brien
7–5, 7–5, 4–6, 6–1
Loss 14. 1996 Indianapolis, US Hard Czech Republic Cyril Suk United States Jim Grabb
United States Richey Reneberg
6–7, 6–4, 4–6

Performance timelines[edit]

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# DNQ A NH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (DNQ) did not qualify; (A) absent; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)

Singles[edit]

Professional Career
Tournament 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 SR W–L
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open A NH A A A 2R 2R 1R QF 1R 3R 1R 1R W 3R A 1 / 10 17–9
French Open A A A 2R A 2R 2R F 2R 1R 1R 3R 4R 1R 2R A 0 / 11 15–11
Wimbledon A A A 3R A 1R 1R 2R 4R 2R 4R A 4R QF Q2 A 0 / 9 17–9
US Open A A A 1R A 2R 1R 1R 1R A QF 3R QF 1R A A 0 / 9 11–9
Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 3–3 0–0 3–4 2–4 7–4 8–4 1–3 9–4 4–3 9–4 11–3 3–2 0–0 1 / 39 60–38
Year-end championship
Tennis Masters Cup Did Not Qualify RR Did Not Qualify 0 / 1 0–3
Grand Slam Cup Not Held QF W 1R SF QF NH 1 / 5 7–4
ATP Masters Series
Indian Wells Masters Tournaments Were Not

Masters Series Events

Before 1990
A 1R 3R QF F 2R 1R A QF 1R A 0 / 8 11–8
Miami Masters 2R 2R 3R SF QF 2R 4R 2R 4R 1R A 0 / 10 14–10
Monte-Carlo Masters 2R A 2R 3R 2R 1R 3R A QF A A 0 / 7 7–7
Rome Masters 1R A SF A A 1R 2R A 1R A A 0 / 5 5–5
Hamburg Masters 1R A 2R A 3R 2R A A A A A 0 / 4 2–4
Canada Masters 2R F QF SF 2R 2R 3R 1R 2R A A 0 / 9 13–9
Cincinnati Masters 1R 2R QF 2R 2R 2R 2R 2R QF A A 0 / 9 9–9
Stuttgart Masters 3R QF QF QF 1R A A W 2R A A 1 / 7 13–6
Paris Masters 1R QF 2R 3R QF A SF 3R 2R A A 0 / 8 11–8
Win–Loss N/A 3–8 11–6 12–9 13–7 14–8 4–7 13–7 7–4 8–8 0–2 0–0 1 / 67 85–66
Career Statistics
Finals 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 7 3 3 0 2 3 2 0 0 27
Titles 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 10
Overall Win–Loss 0–1 0–0 2–1 8–13 13–8 24–27 45–24 62–30 54–23 38–22 27–23 42–19 55–24 34–21 6–12 0–0 410–248
Win % 0% 66% 38% 62% 47% 65% 67% 70% 63% 54% 69% 70% 62% 33% 62.31%
Year-End Ranking 794 511 87 188 59 38 9 7 12 18 41 24 13 13 1332

Doubles[edit]

Professional Career
Tournament 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 ... 2005 SR W–L
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open A NH A A A 2R 1R 2R 1R 3R SF W 2R A A A A A A 1 / 8 15–7
French Open A A 1R 2R 2R F 2R QF SF A 1R 3R 3R A A A A A A 0 / 10 19–10
Wimbledon A A A 1R A 2R 2R 1R A A A A A A A A A A A 0 / 4 2–4
US Open A A A A 3R 2R 3R 1R A A 3R 1R 1R A A A A A A 0 / 7 7–7
Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 0–1 1–2 3–2 8–4 4–4 4–4 4–2 2–1 6–3 8–2 3–3 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 1 / 29 43–28
ATP Masters Series
Indian Wells Masters Tournaments Were Not

Masters Series Events

Before 1990
1R 1R 1R 1R 1R 1R A A A A A A A 0 / 6 0–6
Miami Masters 2R A QF QF A QF 3R 1R A A A A A 0 / 6 12–5
Monte-Carlo Masters W A F W 1R 1R 1R A QF A A A A 2 / 7 16–4
Rome Masters 1R A 2R A A 2R 2R A A A A A A 0 / 4 3–4
Hamburg Masters 2R A 2R A A A A A A A A A A 0 / 2 2–2
Canada Masters 1R 2R A A 1R 1R 2R A A A A A A 0 / 5 2–5
Cincinnati Masters 2R 1R 1R W 2R 1R 1R 1R 2R A A A A 1 / 9 8–7
Stuttgart Masters QF A A A A A 2R A A A A A A 0 / 2 2–2
Paris Masters 1R A A 2R A A QF A A A A A A 0 / 3 3–3
Win–Loss N/A 9–8 1–3 9–6 14–3 1–4 4–5 7–7 0–2 3–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 3 / 44 48–38
Year-End Ranking 296 91 46 26 15 63 64 32 115 44 23 220 321 1009 1536 1683

Top 10 wins[edit]

Season 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Total
Wins 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 7 7 6 1 2 4 3 0 37
# Player Rank Event Surface Rd Score KR
1990
1. United States Jay Berger 10 Philadelphia, United States Carpet (i) QF 7–6, 6–1 53
2. United States Brad Gilbert 5 Davis Cup, Prague, Czechoslovakia Carpet (i) RR 6–2, 6–3, 6–3 26
1991
3. United States Andre Agassi 6 Montreal, Canada Hard 2R 7–6(7–3), 6–2 40
4. United States Jim Courier 5 Montreal, Canada Hard SF 3–6, 7–6(7–1), 6–2 40
5. Czechoslovakia Ivan Lendl 5 Stockholm, Sweden Carpet (i) 3R 5–7, 6–1, 6–4 13
6. Spain Sergi Bruguera 9 Paris, France Carpet (i) 3R 6–2, 6–4 11
1992
7. United States Pete Sampras 4 Davis Cup, Fort Myers, United States Hard RR 6–4, 6–3, 2–6, 6–3 10
8. United States Pete Sampras 4 Rome, Italy Clay QF 1–6, 7–6(7–4), 6–3 9
9. Germany Michael Stich 5 World Team Cup, Düsseldorf, Germany Clay RR 6–3, 6–2 8
10. United States Pete Sampras 3 World Team Cup, Düsseldorf, Germany Clay RR 6–3, 6–1 8
11. Sweden Stefan Edberg 2 Long Island, United States Hard SF 7–5, 7–5 6
12. United States Ivan Lendl 9 Long Island, United States Hard F 6–2, 6–2 6
13. United States Ivan Lendl 9 Basel, Switzerland Hard (i) SF 6–4, 6–3 7
1993
14. Sweden Stefan Edberg 3 Miami, United States Hard QF 7–6(7–3), 7–6(7–5) 5
15. Germany Michael Stich 10 World Team Cup, Düsseldorf, Germany Clay RR 7–6(7–0), 6–1 6
16. Sweden Stefan Edberg 3 World Team Cup, Düsseldorf, Germany Clay RR 6–1, 6–1 6
17. Germany Michael Stich 7 Davis Cup, Halle, Germany Grass RR 6–2, 7–6(7–5) 9
18. United States Ivan Lendl 7 Montreal, Canada Hard QF 7–6(7–4), 6–1 11
19. Spain Sergi Bruguera 4 Grand Slam Cup, Munich, Germany Carpet (i) QF 4–6, 6–0, 6–4 12
20. United States Pete Sampras 1 Grand Slam Cup, Munich, Germany Carpet (i) SF 3–6, 7–6(7–3), 3–6, 7–6(12–10), 13–11 12
21. Germany Michael Stich 2 Grand Slam Cup, Munich, Germany Carpet (i) F 2–6, 6–4, 7–6(7–5), 2–6, 11–9 12
1994
22. Croatia Goran Ivanišević 7 Milan, Italy Carpet (i) QF 6–4, 4–6, 6–2 14
23. Spain Sergi Bruguera 4 Milan, Italy Carpet (i) SF 4–6, 6–1, 6–4 14
24. United States Todd Martin 9 Indian Wells, United States Hard 3R 6–4, 3–6, 6–2 14
25. Sweden Magnus Gustafsson 10 Munich, Germany Clay QF 6–4, 6–4 13
26. Sweden Stefan Edberg 3 World Team Cup, Düsseldorf, Germany Clay RR 6–1, 6–4 12
27. Sweden Stefan Edberg 6 Paris, France Carpet (i) 2R 4–6, 6–1, 6–4 20
1995
28. United States Michael Chang 5 Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom Grass 2R 6–4, 6–4, 6–4 56
1996
29. Croatia Goran Ivanišević 5 Ostrava, Czech Republic Carpet (i) 2R 7–6(7–5), 6–2 49
30. Chile Marcelo Ríos 10 Paris, France Carpet (i) 2R 6–3, 6–4 37
1997
31. Austria Thomas Muster 4 Halle, Germany Grass QF 6–3, 6–4 27
32. United States Pete Sampras 1 US Open, New York, United States Hard 4R 6–7(4–7), 7–5, 7–6(7–2), 3–6, 7–6(7–3) 16
33. Chile Marcelo Ríos 10 Stuttgart, Germany Carpet (i) QF 6–3, 6–4 17
34. Australia Pat Rafter 3 Stuttgart, Germany Carpet (i) SF 6–4, 7–6(7–3) 17
1998
35. Sweden Jonas Björkman 4 Australian Open, Melbourne, Australia Hard QF 3–6, 5–7, 6–3, 6–4, 6–2 7
36. Chile Marcelo Ríos 8 Australian Open, Melbourne, Australia Hard F 6–2, 6–2, 6–2 7
37. Sweden Jonas Björkman 7 World Team Cup, Düsseldorf, Germany Clay RR 6–3, 6–1 2

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Petr Korda: Overview". ATP Tour. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  2. ^ Rios asks for doping check of Korda from 1998. tennis.com (2015-03-05). Retrieved on 2015-11-07.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Korda suspended for a year". The Augusta Chronicle. Associated Press. 1 September 1999. Archived from the original on 9 July 2013.
  4. ^ "Korda awaits doping case ruling", BBC, 28 January 1999.
  5. ^ "Korda escapes ban", BBC, 29 January 1999.
  6. ^ "Korda fires caddie mid-round". ESPN.com. Associated Press. 29 June 2013. Retrieved 30 June 2013.
  7. ^ Sebastian Korda
  8. ^ http://www.itftennis.com/juniors/players/player/profile.aspx?PlayerID=100291609

External links[edit]