Phil Hardy

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This article is about the football player. For the music and film journalist, see Phil Hardy (journalist). For the Irish poet, bookseller, printer and publisher, see Philip Dixon Hardy.
Phil Hardy
Personal information
Full name Philip Hardy[1]
Date of birth (1973-04-09) 9 April 1973 (age 44)
Place of birth Chester, England
Height 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Playing position Left-back
Youth career
Wrexham
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1990–2001 Wrexham 349 (1)
2001–2002 Port Vale 8 (1)
Total 357 (2)
National team
Republic of Ireland under-21 3 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Philip Hardy (born 9 April 1973) is an English-born former Ireland under-21 footballer who played as a left-back. With Welsh club Wrexham from 1990 to 2001, he played more than 450 games under manager Brian Flynn. He was named on the PFA Team of the Year for the 1991–92 Fourth Division campaign. He picked up both a winners medal and a runners-up medal in the Welsh Cup, and during his time at the club Wrexham reached four FAW Premier Cup finals, winning on three occasions, and were also promoted out of the Third Division in 1992–93. He later played ten games for Port Vale, before leaving the professional game in 2002.

Club career[edit]

Hardy started his career with Fourth Division Wrexham, signing professionally for Brian Flynn's side in 1990. He played in the Welsh Cup final at the Cardiff Arms Park in 1991, in what finished as a 2–0 win for Swansea City.[2] An ever-present in the 1991–92 season, along with fellow full-back Andy Thackeray, he played in the club's giant-killing of Arsenal in the FA Cup Third Round. They were eventually defeated by West Ham United in the next round, following a replay. For his performances, Hardy was named on the PFA Team of the Year.

Following the creation of the Premier League, Wrexham spent the 1992–93 season in the Third Division. A second-place finish then won the club promotion into the Second Division. The "Red Dragons" held their own in the third tier, and remained in the division for the rest of Hardy's time at the club.

He played in the 1995 Welsh Cup Final victory over Cardiff City,[3] his first appearance in a cup final. Wrexham equalled a club record by reaching the FA Cup quarter-finals in 1996–97, beating Colwyn Bay, Scunthorpe United, West Ham United, Peterborough United and Birmingham City on the way. Drawn against Chesterfield, also of the Third Division, a 1–0 defeat at Saltergate prevented the club from making a first-ever appearance in the FA Cup semi-finals. However Hardy was limited to just sixteen appearances throughout the 1996–97 season.

He posted 39 appearances in 1997–98, picking up seven yellow cards. Wrexham became the inaugural winners of the FAW Premier Cup in 1998, beating Cardiff City 2–1 at the Racecourse Ground. He played 42 games in 1998–99, and at the end of the season Wrexham played in the 1999 FAW Premier Cup Final, losing out 2–1 to Barry Town. He played 45 games in 1999–2000, and Wrexham won the FAW Premier Cup for a third time in 2000, following a 2–0 victory over Cardiff City. Over the course of the campaign he was sent off against Luton Town and Bristol Rovers, and scored his first league goal in a 1–0 win over Colchester United on 24 April.

He made just fourteen appearances in 2000–01, as Wrexham reached the FAW Premier Cup final for a fourth time in 2001, and beat Swansea City 2–0 at Vetch Field. He departed the club at the end of the campaign. Despite being granted a testimonial match for serving the club for more than ten years and playing over 450 games (in all competitions),[4] financial problems from the 2001 season onwards meant that he never received the game.[citation needed]

In June 2001 he signed with Brian Horton's Port Vale. He scored on his league debut for the "Valiants" on 25 August, helping Vale to beat Peterborough United 4–1 at Vale Park. However, he was out of the first team picture by October, and was transfer listed in November.[5] Chester City expressed interest in signing him on loan the following month.[6] He joined Luton Town on trial in January 2002,[7] but manager Joe Kinnear decided that Hardy was too small for the Third Division.[8] With ten appearances to his name in 2001–02, he left Vale in April 2002. In November that year had a trial with Mansfield Town.[9] However the 29-year-old failed to find a contract at another Football League club, and announced his retirement.[10]

International career[edit]

Hardy earned three caps for the Republic of Ireland U21 side.

On 29 May 1993, Hardy was a member of an Irish side which played Hungary in a testimonial for David O'Leary,[11] coming on as a substitute for Steve Staunton; the Hungarians won the match 4–2.[12] Although the rest of the Irish team were past or future internationals, the match has not been granted full international status.[13]

Post-retirement[edit]

After retiring Hardy went on to a career in engineering, before becoming a driver for a factory in Ellesmere Port.[14]

Statistics[edit]

  • Sourced from Phil Hardy profile at the English National Football Archive (subscription required)
Club Season Division League FA Cup Other Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Wrexham 1989–90 Fourth Division 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
1990–91 Fourth Division 32 0 1 0 5 0 38 0
1991–92 Fourth Division 42 0 5 0 8 0 55 0
1992–93 Third Division 32 0 1 0 5 0 38 0
1993–94 Second Division 25 0 2 0 7 0 34 0
1994–95 Second Division 44 0 4 0 8 0 56 0
1995–96 Second Division 42 0 4 0 7 0 53 0
1996–97 Second Division 13 0 6 0 2 0 21 0
1997–98 Second Division 34 0 4 0 1 0 39 0
1998–99 Second Division 33 0 4 0 5 0 42 0
1999–2000 Second Division 38 1 5 0 2 0 45 1
2000–01 Second Division 13 0 0 0 1 0 14 0
Total 349 1 36 0 51 0 436 1
Port Vale 2001–02 Second Division 8 1 0 0 2 0 10 1
Career Total 357 2 36 0 53 0 446 2

Honours[edit]

with Wrexham

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Phil Hardy". Barry Hugman's Footballers. Retrieved 9 March 2017. 
  2. ^ "19 May 1991 at the National Stadium, Cardiff". wfda.co.uk. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
  3. ^ "21 May 1995 at the National Stadium, Cardiff". wfda.co.uk. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
  4. ^ "Dragon Watch". wrexhamafc.co.uk. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
  5. ^ "Hardy transfer-listed". BBC Sport. 20 November 2001. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  6. ^ "Chester's bold moves". BBC Sport. 19 December 2001. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  7. ^ "Hardy's Luton trial". BBC Sport. 29 January 2002. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  8. ^ "Hardy fails to measure up". BBC Sport. 6 February 2002. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  9. ^ "Mansfield run rule over Hardy". BBC Sport. 5 September 2002. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  10. ^ "Hardy's playing days over". Wrexham Evening Leader. 27 January 2003. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
  11. ^ Morrison, Neil (2 February 2005). "International matches 1993". RSSSF. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
  12. ^ "Rep. of Ireland 2 Hungary 4". www.eu-football.info. 29 May 1993. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
  13. ^ "Rep. Ireland v. Hungary – Player "Hardy"". www.eu-football.info. 29 October 2011. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
  14. ^ Fissler, Neil. "Port Vale – H". where-are-they-now.co.uk. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 

External links[edit]