Philadelphia Center for Architecture

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121612220Arch.JPG
Founded 2002 (2002)
Type 501(c)(3) charitable organization
Location
Area served
Greater Philadelphia
Website http://philadelphiacfa.org/
The AIA Bookstore at the Center
1218 Arch Street, Philadelphia

The Philadelphia Center for Architecture is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded in 2002[1] by the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). The Center opened a physical space on the ground floor of the Smyth Young Field Company Building in 2008.[1] The building, at 1218 Arch Street, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[2] The Center serves as a venue for public programs on architecture, urban planning, and design, including various competitions and exhibitions, as well as home to offices for AIA Philadelphia, the Community Design Collaborative, and the AIA Bookstore.[1][3][4]

History[edit]

AIA Philadelphia is the second oldest Chapter of the AIA and a nonprofit with IRS 501(c)(6) status, designating it as a professional membership organization. The American Institute of Architects was founded in 1857, and the Philadelphia chapter received its charter in 1869. The Chapter includes members from Philadelphia, Delaware, Chester and Montgomery Counties. AIA Philadelphia has a history of community engagement. Activities include helping to create Independence National Historical Park, the Charter High School for Architecture + Design, the Community Design Collaborative, and the Philadelphia Center for Architecture.[5]

John Claypool became Executive Director of AIA Philadelphia in 2001.[6] Under his leadership, the Philadelphia Center for Architecture was established as a separate nonprofit with IRS 501(c)(3) status, designating it as an educational non-profit. Its purpose was to support charitable and educational initiatives to benefit the community at large, on behalf of the architectural profession. It developed programs in the community.[5]

The Center soon took advantage of the opportunity to create a physical space as well as providing a set of programs. The Center at 1218 Arch Street opened in 2008. In 2009 the Chapter and Center boards created a framework to coordinate the two organizations. The Chapter board holds the authority for annually appointing the Board of the Center. The Center's mission involves engaging "the public, decision leaders, thought leaders, and allied design professionals" on issues related to design and architecture, to recognize and enhance the quality of architecture in the region,[5] distinct from AIA Philadelphia's mission to provide architects with "opportunities for professional development, service, and collegiality among peers".[7]

Leadership[edit]

John Claypool served as Executive Director of both AIA Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Center for Architecture from 2001 to 2014, when he was succeeded by Rebecca Johnson.[6][8][9]

David Bender was hired as the sole full-time employee of the Center when their doors opened in May 2008 and has served as Associate Director of the Center since January 2014.[10]

Hilary Jay became the first Director of the Philadelphia Center for Architecture in June 2013,[11][12] remaining there until May 2015.[13][14]

Major Programs[edit]

The Center's signature event, DesignPhiladelphia, was begun by Hilary Jay in 2005. She was inspired by one of the first design festivals, in London. DesignPhiladelphia moved with Jay from the Design Center at Philadelphia University in 2005, to the University of the Arts in 2010, and finally to the Philadelphia Center for Architecture in 2013, where it remains.[13]

The Center produces a variety of annual and ongoing programs for the general public on the topics of architecture, urban planning, and design,[15] including:

  • Emergence Of A Modern Metropolis: Philadelphia[16] walking tour (year-round)
  • Edmund N. Bacon Memorial Award + Talk[17][18] for urban planning and design (annually in February)
  • Building Philadelphia: Architecture, History, + Politics[19] 10-part speaker series (annually in spring)
  • Louis I. Kahn Memorial Award + Talk[20] for architecture (annually in May)
  • Park(ing) Day Philadelphia a one-day festival in which on-street parking spots become mini public parks[21] (annually in September)
  • Better Philadelphia Challenge[22] an international urban design competition for university students (annually in October)
  • DesignPhiladelphia[23] the oldest and largest festival of its kind in the U.S.[24] (annually in October)
  • Spooktacular Halloween village constructed by Charter High School for Architecture + Design students for the Children's Crisis Treatment Center[25] (annually in October)
External video
Roller coaster Knex.jpg
“Constructing Play: Classic Building Toys”, Philadelphia Center for Architecture
“A Decade of DesignPhiladelphia”, Philadelphia Center for Architecture

Major Exhibitions[edit]

The Center hosts annual and ongoing exhibitions,[15] including:

  • Degrees of Design: Student Work from Local Architecture + Design Schools[26][27] (annually in spring)
  • On The Rise: Emerging Firms + Young Architects[28][29] (annually in spring)
  • CANstruction[30] food can sculpture competition and food drive (annually in spring)
  • Sketch Showdown[31] sketching competition (annually in summer)
  • Constructing Play: Classic Building Toys[32][33](annually in winter)

Organizations housed at the Center for Architecture[edit]

  • The Philadelphia Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA Philadelphia)
  • Community Design Collaborative
  • AIA Bookstore

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "About the Center for Architecture". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  2. ^ McVarish, Douglas C. (1992). "Young, Smyth, Field Company Building" (PDF). Pennsylvania CGRIS. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 21 September 2015. 
  3. ^ "About AIA Philadelphia". AIA Philadelphia. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  4. ^ "Neon art colors the Center for Architecture". Philadelphia Daily News. June 8, 2012. Retrieved 24 September 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c "AIA Philadelphia & Center for Architecture Strategic Plan 2013 – 2017" (PDF). 2012. 
  6. ^ a b Massie, Caroline (June 18, 2014). "Caroline Massie". Architect Magazine. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  7. ^ "About AIA Philadelphia". AIA Philadelphia. Retrieved 14 October 2015. 
  8. ^ "Rebecca Johnson Named Executive Director of AIA Philadelphia and Philadelphia Center for Architecture". AIA Philadelphia News. 17 June 2014. 
  9. ^ Ruane, Kelsey (August 27, 2015). "Philadelphia Center for Architecture Announces 2015 DesignPhiladelphia Festival Returning October 8-16". BusinessWire. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  10. ^ "Staff and Board". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 14 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "Center for Architecture Names Hilary Jay Director". AIA Philadelphia News. 12 June 2013. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  12. ^ Director Search Committee AIA Philadelphia/ Center for Architecture. "Position Description / Job Announcement Director of Philadelphia Center for Architecture" (PDF). AIA Philadelphia. Retrieved November 5, 2012. 
  13. ^ a b "Center for Architecture's Jay steps down, DesignPhiladelphia goes on". Philadelphia Inquirer. May 22, 2015. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  14. ^ Melamed, Samantha (May 30, 2015). "Hilary Jay: After 10 years with DesignPhiladelphia, time for reinvention". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  15. ^ a b "Programs + Exhibitions". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  16. ^ "Emergence of a Modern Metropolis: Philadelphia". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  17. ^ Griffiths, Ben; Hartman, Kate (September 11, 2012). "Plan Philly: Student Design Competition Exhibits at the Philadelphia Center for Architecture". Philadelphia Neighborhoods. Retrieved 24 September 2015. 
  18. ^ "Edmund N. Bacon Memorial Award + Talk". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  19. ^ "Building Philadelphia: Architecture, History, + Politics". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  20. ^ "Louis I. Kahn Memorial Award + Talk". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  21. ^ "About Park(ing) Day". Park(ing) Day Philadelphia. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  22. ^ "Better Philadelphia Challenge". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  23. ^ "DesignPhiladelphia Festival". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  24. ^ Gorshin, Maria (October 10, 2014). "A Decade In, Reflecting On DesignPhiladelphia". Hidden City Philadelphia. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  25. ^ "Spooktacular". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  26. ^ "PhilaU Students Exhibit Work at Philadelphia Center for Architecture". PhilaUToday. February 26, 2014. Retrieved 24 September 2015. 
  27. ^ "Degrees of Design exhibition". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  28. ^ Maule, Bradley (March 15, 2013). "Young Philadelphia Architects Take Center Stage". Hidden City Philadelphia. Retrieved 24 September 2015. 
  29. ^ "On The Rise: Emerging Firms + Young Architects". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  30. ^ "CANstruction". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  31. ^ "Sketch Showdown". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 
  32. ^ "Philadelphia Center for Architecture Launching Free Exhibit Full of LEGO, K'NEX, & OMG Why Aren't We There Right Now?!". Geekadelphia. November 20, 2014. Retrieved 23 September 2015. 
  33. ^ "Constructing Play". Philadelphia Center for Architecture. Retrieved 22 September 2015. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°57′14″N 75°09′37″W / 39.9538°N 75.1604°W / 39.9538; -75.1604